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Mobile TV Use Cases

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This presentation is from the mobile use research presentations / publications shared by Jan Chipchase of Nokia on his website. …

This presentation is from the mobile use research presentations / publications shared by Jan Chipchase of Nokia on his website.

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http://www.janchipchase.com/publications

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  • The material is pulled from qualitative field research of 8 user’s of commercial Mobile TV services in Seoul, 2005. A paper detailing the full research results will be published on http://www.janchipchase.com/publications in due course.
    Presented 21st September 2006 at Annenberg Center for Communication, Los Angeles, hosted by Mizuto Ito and September 26th 2006 to Intel’s People & Practices at Jones Farm Hillsboro, hosted by Wendy March. Both open to the public.
  • Team
  • Handsets used by study participants
  • Looking at contextual use such as everyday travel…
  • … where media content was browsed, considered…
  • … always ending up conducting in-depth interviews in the home…
  • Sample size and participant selection.
    Technical implementation of Mobile TV may vary considerably. The use cases in this presentation refer to DMB (Digital Media Broadcasting) services in Korea and not, for example of DVB-H.
  • Except commuting like this is simply not practical
  • Seated commuting
  • Those short periods of down-time between other activities…
  • Except that micro breaks are too short because it takes a while to connect to the TV signal…
  • So macro breaks are a more reasonable description.
  • The fourth use case remains under wraps until we find an appropriate forum to publish with all the supporting material
  • Transcript

    • 1. NDKIA f m 0V 5% _LI WT Em Om aW5 tmcmm a 0 eml n Smw AMUBQ Jan thipchase Mobile H(I Group
    • 2. nflflm _ . u. l , . _ . . l. >ulm. U can u vi I V at . ... ll. . is: , . ~ l . . . 3: _. .x. . : I w. r , I . ... .- w-. ,.. Mu. lv . ... .I. i 4 _. ,L V _ I l . .3./ no WNW — :1 ffiwaw. ..-IQ . 4 D1. . / . lu. O.. . u. . ll| .. . l . , , .. l Seoul, South Korea, 8 in-depth participants Contextual and home interviews, day mapping Street observation, artifacts, use l
    • 3. Cui Yanqing Youngheejung Boreum Choi Jinwoo Kim Inseong Lee Jieun Yoon ‘*3 ’, . = I. / ' A l is‘ l l, l&. ;_ “ . I H "vi I ’i NI; II<IA
    • 4. I . VI. |u. l: Lt. 1.. .. . . .. 1 r » . _ . .H L‘: w . J” . .. .. . : 3 . . . .-J. . V H . H I '6.
    • 5. K” l- . L _ . ..'. ‘—‘. —- ‘ _ to "" _‘_. l V __'_'_. - V ‘ ( ‘I. I K4 ‘v.4-/ ' , ’ . .- : ' "»— r, .aa'(
    • 6. / .1" 4 / . , 4 V5 "i l . _ ‘ nI; .:l. '
    • 7. (limits of this research)
    • 8. four use cases
    • 9. .. . , (ll. 4 we. .. .3 . .. . . . ..
    • 10. I1-1 V''I1 LEI I I 3 I‘I . .v I I lg.
    • 11. < -g-s '.
    • 12. .5 . ..: .. . . . . . , . r. , . ... . ~ -I a. . I . .4.. . . . . .. . .. ’»I . . . . .0 . ... E F. . c . _ -,1‘ In ‘. as -. '=2--‘~'= 1.:
    • 13. :". ".‘. C:’C breaks
    • 14. v u. 31-9. tux K. .. . ... . , . ~ . . . . . .. ... . . . #9.»! o. . . . . ... E w. .2.. . ’. .. ,.. ._. _ . . 'J‘ In ‘. it :5!-~‘~'= 1.:
    • 15. LT‘ . . l _ N . {4“‘ use case remains confidential}
    • 16. macro-breaks
    • 17. ‘I; . J T > . 4.. .. . .. . M. . . .. i .
    • 18. f__ -_. tel g. 2 A macro break is a moment oftime between ‘A-. .. other planned activities. We are interested in such breaks simply because the mobile phone is often carried and is available for use during this time '3!‘ I57] -"‘ ~ . ; :3 / -- : A, -. — ; ~ . l’ - ,3 >. _, -'. ., '»‘4~. , . _ _ _ » . ,.A A ~. ~. ~~-E, ,~ - w '. : T‘-‘7_"": -I"'~ " ‘ , I . ' 3 _ . '4 I . 2 «*7: u‘‘ -7' 5 - ' . x'. ‘ pa, . . . V . ‘ - v . - " _ 7 . '. T, _: —#_; . Z n " E . | I 7 . ea. .. v j. _ 1.11;. . V, ‘ J! .,. r
    • 19. i. -— —; tel . .. I Examples of macro breaks include sitting in a trafficjam, waiting for kettle to boil, waiting for friends, waiting for an elevator, to cross the road, for public transport to arrive, for a sports event to begin, having a cigarette
    • 20. i. —— -.4 tel . .. I T . —¢__4_. . » I ___, ga- Common activities during macro- breaks include checking for incoming communication, playing a quick game [of snake], sending a message, or browsing a web site .5‘ lF7‘7]_{. :‘. i l
    • 21. _ . ,_, ' Mobile TV is a candidate activity -“" A‘ ' “ L for use during breaks. However _ . fr‘; J ,2 the user needs first to find f~‘-‘. 'r~'”‘- ' ‘T " "'- ""‘ " ' ‘_ contenttheywishtowatch and ‘ (depending on the system] then connect to a TV channel (DMB in , _, -5;“, .4‘ -. .. . ~-. .7’ South Korea took up to a minute I —' T to connect). The headset may "*—"*"'“‘ need to be worn for content to be fully enjoyed V __l we . ~——; ~ -. ~ l "I __ ___*‘. : ‘ . , g __ b , . J. ‘ A- I '}7‘lF7‘7]_{t; ‘.»
    • 22. :. r'- -- ‘zrt / ' —: _* Some breaks are ; 1 planned others “ are not. _ -35“, .41.: -~-. » 7’ : ' '- VI’ . ._. . . I A - ‘.1’-4'
    • 23. The length ofthe break time may be predictable or not. M. -_, _.. »:Q, , J. ‘ -v. r-.
    • 24. The user may have - , ' . ’ ' ‘:17’ control overhow 1' - ' -L . N long the breaklasts ~ 5. T or not "-‘~"- V ' , -3;“, ~". ‘Y. x -~-, » X A - V‘ ' . -_. T j— , _ ‘ _ _. . . tel , _j. _ —-—- _ ’_ —_ ‘ o i
    • 25. l Ifa break needs to be interrupted e. g. a bus arrives early, then the task of watching TV also needs to be easily stopped or paused. (if paused it needs to be easy to resume watching] T - j . ;i' ' __ -. " _ , . , . I . . ' -3‘ . ’ I . - " ‘>—— 1, H i v‘. =.~ I I 11 I‘ "L , ;‘i. ‘-‘ 2" _‘, , ~. Q . * , , ‘'-A. H‘ . ~ ' . '. ’. 7 ~; _¢. ,., . , , . -. -. V , ._<, ..; ,,. _ V , _ . I _,4- ~a -1’ : . ' , f v 9- .1 . 1.: - , V . - Q . . . - —_ 7 I . '. T. .: g__—_. . e— , . _. i . I r ‘ ___, T. v . _._. ... "‘. __ 1.2:: . 1:3 »
    • 26. :- The ambient conditions vary considerably depending on where the break occurs. The noise level will affect whether a headset is needed, -. . whether the user can hear audio [and disturb others), the lighting conditions will affect whether the screen can u. .. be seen -- T . I . -€- ___, T . ~! I57] , . _i». ’,.
    • 27. . ll . . T - ij :1 . ;i' ' : ___ __ , —j. _ __ ~. ‘ _ l l ““ is it possible to carry out Mobile TV related tasks without using a headset? TV can be watched without audio, and the user can check TV listings for later viewing Ir? ) v. ‘ _i». ’,.
    • 28. Ni’ —; tel . .. 2 T . :g—_1—. . r I . .-: —- ___, T . - However the ease of alternatives - checking messages, browsing the web mean that mobile TV has still competition during shorter (micro) breaks It? i _Is. ’;.
    • 29. The USBV mall hr‘ Mobile TV is a candidate activity Ifa break nee‘ control over hc 50 ' - for use durin breaks. However Interrupted e'g' ‘3 ‘mg the bleak '5 The '6'-‘gm ofthe pl the user mgeds first to find early, then the or not breaktime may be t uh . ht I h d watching TV also . predictable or not. Con en ey W's 0 We C an or paused It needs ttohb-e eiesy to K we-Ir . South Korea took up to a minute resumewa C mg — e to connect) The headset may need to be worn for content to be pninunrl - I - C0rnl'n0n aCtl/ ltles during macro- breaks include checking for incoming communication, playing a quick game (ofsnake), 3 sending a message, ‘ ' or browsing aweb I The ambient conditions vary considerably depending on where the break occurs. The noise - level will affect whether ; a headset is needed, I whether the user can hear audio [and disturb others), the lighting conditions will affect whether the screen can 1 I Ir 2 3 3 be seen K How A macro break is a Examples. °“. “a°*° l". ea. l<S Is it possible to carry out aiten. moment of time between "e'“d. e5”"“9 ‘“ '3 ”eff‘elem= . Mobile TV related tasks messa other planned activities. We'. ““9 for kettle t° b. °.”! I I without using a headset? TV Nab m We are interested in such Wamng f°" f“e"d5~ Waltmg can be watched without audio, as still breaks simply because the f°' 3“ e'e"et°. '- t° “O55 the , N and the user can check TV short mobile phone is often '°3Fl» fer p“b"e "anspert to . listings for later viewing carried and is available for e"'Ve= for 3 spells evem ‘C’ Use during this time begin, having a cigarette
    • 30. evening commute
    • 31. 1"‘ -51:41}! W .
    • 32. l . a.a—: Mornings tend to include high pressure tasks such as eating breakfast, managing appearance, getting into office/ school on time which leave less time for relaxed mobile TV watching. However it varies between cultures , .—, ,+ vv V (I , / . ' _, / / '1 . 1' 3 / ' r V ‘ fl 1 ; _‘-; _ / ’ i -‘ ‘‘. ";3*“%« 3 -"fit 5*’ / ~ . ‘ 3‘ I 4 ‘ T‘ ‘ y . ‘ 3 ‘ , -,/1. Z3 ‘ E. ,2 " _, — l ' Ii -".3 , ., l, __ I n a X. iiiiri VI’ ‘ I-. ' >~
    • 33. _ A one hour commute may include only 15 _minutes time which is suitable for watching Mobile TV_. User -. _ may switch from audio to T. V 1, 3 and back during the commute (one bonus- at least the battery wont run out) i , L r . ; ‘ 0 I . ’. -~' i. l ‘ , t I . T , / ‘. ., , , i "re 3 {ti ' . i _‘ -‘. ‘'. %v 33:53:; 3" 5/ _ . ‘ s -g‘-§_ lglrl r 11-. ‘ V
    • 34. I u‘ — . . V . '1 1 . Externalities such as reflections caused by bright lights, negotiating traffic and potholes in the road make watching TV less enjoyable --—
    • 35. _-| [ Arm resting on bag supporting USE .
    • 36. 1/» ‘. _ The signal reception varies :3 ‘ _ as the bus moves between ‘ 1 __ ‘ neighbourhoods. .' , 4‘ Externally antenna too “ ’ 1‘ bulky to carry. V r l I . _ ‘i / '7 “ ; ‘ ~‘~ I z _ ’ ” / - - -V i. l . i / e r . -3’; I _ r r‘ "C :2 ' . ~ , - ' _ . ,,= =‘ —1‘-rvv. ' ‘. J / w‘'/ //‘V . r ‘_ x ‘_ Tf « §§§_lrl! <ib_e
    • 37. 'L‘‘. ‘. f ‘I . ‘~ — r V . '1 l . During rainy weather the windows may steam up making it harder to track the location of the vehicle. [less time to devote to mobile TV] Also need to hold umbrella and cope with wet lglfl 1‘ 11-. ‘ y
    • 38. Limited pri y hing in se ' public space E a W
    • 39. :". . ‘ , . . ¢' >- ; , /1. J3 ‘ ~. ,1 " _V — l ‘ . 'g _". ;. ' A ' n a X‘ Watching in public requires use ofa headset to avoid disturbing others. Sound from announcements from the bus conductor disturb viewing
    • 40. — > V ' Xtfl. :1 - / / ‘ (I ‘R '- ’ / ‘ _V _ L l ' l 2 I r / V x. . l ‘ -".3 . , 1 . __ , ._ r I ‘A I f/ ' "a" V at ' . ' . .:“ _u": ~ --.9" ‘. -i - -V‘, /*“"{ fa. / s . ‘ ‘ T‘ t’ ‘ r . Use of headsets varies from culture to culture. If headsets are not normally worn then setup takes longer
    • 41. Z Iv _ D’ -V’ . - r V . A u ‘I . ‘~ — i . . V . '1 l What level ofenjoyment is possible without headset? E. g. subtitles or tagging content to watch at a later time l I '3 lglfil 1‘ fir. ‘ I
    • 42. . gfilrl I‘ fir. ‘ Shared use tricky without additional headset . . . . . . 1.. 9 . ., s . .v. I. . . . V . p
    • 43. I i i/ , I’ :2 «i r‘ 2. . r, ’ - ‘V? !-. ‘ J 0 I / - - ’ -V’ a. l ‘ / - i l ' _ ‘ ‘‘’l/ / I ‘. ,‘ l ‘I K. ~ - I Keeping track ofthe time is g y 5, . ‘ particularly important ’ _ ’ I _l when watching TV during _. ,>_: ..? _, ‘-‘ com_m_uting. The cost of 5., ' ‘ / missing a stop varies L‘ “,4 -ex-fig lglrl : < fir. ‘ I
    • 44. L? 4 r‘ I ‘ l ‘/ Watching TV means he is not able to keep an eye on his bag = higher risk of theft. Bag is likely to rest on lap, and the mobile TV will rest on the bag . ‘, I. “Ir! :« in‘
    • 45. There are strong differences in how people commute in different cultures. For example 75% of _ Americans commute in sole occupancy cars. I I V’ («"5 A.
    • 46. Mobile TV is too difficult to watch for standing passengers - the device is too heavy and hands maybe required for support at short notice [more for busses than for subway) ‘ , . r ‘ _, // , _ i _ I I x. ‘ ‘ : "I "II . 5: . 1*. H; ' _. - « , -_ -tar vi L‘ T" ‘I f - 1 -g -u§_ p ‘i’ If T’ . * i Z 1 I . .'i I v I, 0’ -" ' . - . V l . _‘i. ‘ , - r ' A ' 2 X. lglfil 1‘ fir. ‘ I
    • 47. Music is a better mood ~«i regulator than TVin the mornings
    • 48. l I .1" Mornings tend to include high pressure tasks such as eating breakfast, managing appearance, getting into office/ school on time which‘ leave less time for relaxed mobile Tlm-‘etching. I _ Musicisabettermood ' ‘ . ,. regulator . thah Tliilin the mornings UTIOIE TOT DUSSES tnan for subway) differences in hovv people commute in different cultures E’ eenl 3 § ‘. b ’ Wlattchirig TV means he is not able to keep an eye on his bag = higher risk of theft. Bag is likely to rest Keeping tra important on lap, and the mobile TV will rest on the bag - 9 l' A one hour commute may include only 15 minutes tim‘ which is suitable for watching Mobile TV. User may switch from audio to T. and back. .>during'the commute (one= bonus- at least the battery wont run out). 5"»-“it level of enjoymventis Shared use tricky without additional headset Exterr reflect bright lig traffic an road ms les. ‘ ~ I Ilir The signalieception varies as the bus moves between neighbourhoods. .E><ternal| y. antenna too bu| .ky.1O , C§TlV- -Jll Ul tilt: vciiiur. -5. . ..; ss time to devote to mobile TV) Also neer' and watching in close In PUIIJIIL. I'—'uiIJIl-9 Limited privacy public space use ofa headset to avoid disturbing other. Sound from announcements from We hm‘ conductor disturb ble without headset? subtitles or tagging. nt to watch at aiylater time adsets varies ire to culture. ets are not Iworn then kes longer l
    • 49. home use
    • 50. ? ~. . s q I . ... |IIlI ‘ s. i. —: . x ‘. . J .1 / . 1.b . , . . 3 . .. as r. ... A, ,, c. .. x . ... ..» . .. . .x. . .,w . § , . . .«. m.n. . . ... .. ... . L . . nu. . . . . s i_. , . .
    • 51. l Surprisingly the home ' is one ofthe most popular places to watch mobile TV. But why? ll JM . ..) / . . . . ..; . . «. . . 3 . «l. f .1 _. . ‘ . :9 ll . .. . . xi , . 1- I4. . iv. , . ,“ r. . . . . . . . 2. . . v. . .V $5; . . . .. i. ... .. .4 . . . . , _ U 3 . .r. r.. . .. l. u. ._ . .. . . . .
    • 52. Using the main [shared] TV in the living room requires negotiation with other family members. whereas the user is in control ofmobile TV
    • 53. I'M-‘ ‘.2 There are strong cultural differences regarding the number ofregularTVs in the home. In the USA teens are likely to have a TV, but much less likely in Korea. Do people watch Mobile TV when an alternative is available? It partly depends on what contents [and features) are available through each medium . ,._, ,,. x _ u ' 3 ‘ ~ _ . } . _- p. -- _‘
    • 54. For our participants the bedroom was the major place to watch mobile TV. It's a comfortable space over which they have a high degree ofcontrol. And they can easily multi-task with other activities such as surfing the web or homework
    • 55. ‘. I. - 4 . I . The bedroom space is also suitable for watching very personal media (if l lHw. v., .. In ilui. ‘.1 I A . , ill ,5 Ill Ali 4 . .. . llJ. i IMMI H ’ . . iI . In . x z _. I W k. 1. 1.1!. .. . . o . 4 1 V v r ' . . I . v v V. C 1 . . f I such content is available) 2‘. . iv. L . .: _ A six. , L1 _ u 2.5 I“. ‘ . . . . 5 . .1 4. . . . -. .. ... .’ . ..v i; , r. . no i . . .. . . . . .v . .%. rr
    • 56. The reception in parts ofthe home_can vary __ considerably <17,“ l l ,5 i A , A;nU . . . , , .3: . . . . . , . , , - . ... _ ll” i l. iii . | I‘. ni . l . ... l ’ . o J . .., / , K . ..; i . i.. iU . 4 1.‘) . 1 . .. w M . . , , . . Y . .Vxn v . . . i . .. i.o_. I . ,r U I Q 1 / '. ‘. . iv.
    • 57. ll). i . l. :1 IMMI . l 3 J ’ . o . . iI . ‘ ‘ll, . 5 6 . z _. I w . n. 1. riuif . 0 . c . 1 V v r ' . . I . v v V. C i Ll: U . f I ~»—, _.--. - Ifan external antenna is available for the phone then it is likely to be stored in the home (it is otherwise too bulky to carry on the off-chance it is needed) 2‘. . iv. L 5 . . .. _ . s . ..» “ . . . . . . . .,u. . , u. . mt»: i. ,, C x. . .. . .. ..x. . . .v
    • 58. l , li I .7‘); p _ "s" ‘ . . ‘ - * I *‘ U 3 ' I -2 . ' ' ' ‘ (X '_ H -, ‘ ‘‘‘s '‘ I '1 I . l I, ’ I‘ . , ‘ *—~ . /.. t . The home spa_ce flexibly supports different 3 ways ofwatching TV — leaning forward and leaning back, active and ambient watching. .. .. . . Leaning forward (shown) works well when ‘ the user is required to multi-task other activities on the phone - taking calls, sending messages. '-—‘—T». .., —: . c- . 1
    • 59. . rI . ‘ ‘V. . . - ; . z _. I w . n. 1. 1.‘): u u 9 ~ 4 . v . .. V . / v , 7 VV .1 I . I t. u . V . I r Y . .Vxo U . .t . .. uo_. I . ,F . . 1 / . 3. . ... V, 4/«_ pt: 1 . 1 pl in’ J 7} / . . . . ..; - . «. . . 3 «I. f It IS possible to watch in the home without a headset- better su pporting multi-tasking T 2‘. . |v. . . . . r . ., w, r . ,, . v . . . W. .. » «R . . .4 1.. .. , nu. ._ . .. . . . x .
    • 60. Ifthe device is watched in bed , then the power cable needs to stretch to the bed. Watching TV until the battery is dead will conflict with other needs such as using the phone as an alarm clock or having a full charged phone when leaving home lg‘).
    • 61. The chances are that the docking station is also kept in the home. The device may be used for long periods oftime, so it will need to be plugged in whilstin use
    • 62. . if Thre are strong cultural . . ‘ differences re ardin th ‘ . SuiLp; :;ngf| ¥ht2:1h0° Using the main (5; number of regular TVsgin t bedr°°m W35 the malor . . J lace to watch mobile TV. lt’s {h | 4 home. In the USA teens ar p popular place“ nego(: jal¥ilc',1,$J§Ji: m likely to have a TV, but mu 3 °°mf° ——e watch mobile TV. . - whi’ ' I I lk I K . D » why? . :;: .;s. ::: .r; :i. .rV The is in C0ntf0l Of . . can, is also suitable for when an alternative I? - available? It partly dep °th Watching Ve-W - - r p" ”' on whatcontents’ ‘A p Thar Ce tionin featureslare avr . .ole e P through eachgnedium h pans °fthe ome can vary considerably For our participants the The chances are that the docking station is also kept in the home. The device may be used for long periods of time, so it will need to be plugged in whilst in use . lfan external antenna IS available for the phone then it is likely to be stored in the home (it is otherwise too bulky to carry on the off-chance it is needed) Ifthe device is watched in bed , then the power cable needs to stretch to the bed. Watching TV until the battery is dead will conflict with other needs such as using the phone as an alarm clock or having a full charged phone when leaving home The home spac___ g___ _ __” ways ofwatching TV - leaning forward and It is possible to leaning back, active and ambient watching. atch in the home Leaning forward (shown) works well when T ithout a headset - the user is required to multi-task other M which supports activities on the phone — taking calls, l multi-tasking l sending messages.
    • 63. Full paper to be published in due course To include: Drivers for use; barriers to adoption; practices of shared use; device lending; a additional use case (excluded here); immersion vs. distraction; cultural differences; mobile phone as a TV vs. as a communication device; 8. a discussion on the future of mobile TV.

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