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Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media
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Njtesol 09: Maps Math Music Media

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  • Source: http://xkcd.com/256
  • Focus on the benefits of common standards
    Railroad tracks
    More people will use it
  • Otherwise our work is irrelevant, devoid of meaning and utility for citizens. When that happens not only are we out of work, but a different kind of democracy may be afoot. Hyper-individuation and quasi-anarchy may be a possible result.
  • Minard Source: http://www.napoleonic-literature.com/1812/1812-t.htm
    Napoleonic Literature Losses Suffered by the Grande Armée during the Russian Campaign Following is a reproduction of a map drawn by Charles Joseph Minard in 1861, and is reputed to be the best statistical graphic ever drawn — by anyone. Crossing the Niemen on 24 June 1812 with an army of 442,000 men, Napoleon entered Moscow on 14 September with a mere 100,000.  On the way, 72,000 men were diverted to other locations. Of these 30,000 managed to rejoin the main column shortly before the crossing of the Berezina River during the retreat, and another 6,000 shortly before it reached the comparative safety of the Niemen River.  This means that the main army; that is, the portion that continued on to Moscow numbered approximately 370,000.  Casualties were extremely high for a campaign in which almost no combat took place — 270,000!   This is a staggering 73% casualties, and that's only on the way to the objective.  Napoleon's problems started immediately after crossing the Niemen.  The weather was uncooperative; the summer started two weeks late, which affected the ripening of the crops, and this in turn robbed Napoleon of the grain he had planned on for feeding his horses.  The cold, heavy rain made quagmires of the roads and fields.  The result of all this was that, from the very outset,  thousands of men and horses died daily.  But that was just the beginning.  The harsh Russian summer now struck with a vengeance.  Coupled with this was the lack of food and water, sickness, privations of every description, and losses to the enemy through capture of stragglers, foraging parties and other unlucky souls, as well as combat.  Although there was relatively little combat, it was brutal and resulted in tremendous casualties on both sides.  Finally, on 14 December 1812, the last of the Grande Armée limped across the Niemen.  Marshal Ney was the last to cross the Niemen and was himself the army's rear guard.  Barely 10,000 members of the Grande Armée survived.  In all, the Grande Armée suffered a staggering 97.7% casualties! The map plots six variables:  the size of the army, its location on a 2-dimensional surface, direction of the army's movement, and temperature on various dates during the retreat from Moscow. Temperatures are given in degrees Réaumur (R), which the Russians used until just prior to World War I. You can obtain a rough idea of the temperatures in centigrade (C) and fahrenheit (F) by the following comparison:  80oR = 100oC = 212oF.
    The conversions from degrees Réaumur to degrees Celcius were provided to me by Pedro Barquin on 3 May 2000. I then converted the Celcius temperatures to Fahrenheit using the JavaScript Temperature Converter. This will assist you to realize the extremely cold temperatures that the French and Russian armies had to endure during the retreat.
    The temperatures Minard shows on his map, in degrees Réaumur and their Centigrade (Celcius) and Fahrenheit equivalents are as follows. The temperatures are listed in the sequence in which they were encountered from the beginning to the end of the retreat; that is, from right to left on the map:  
    DatePlaceRéaumurCelciusFahrenheit18 Oct
    Malojaroslavetz
    0
    0
    32
      9 Nov
    Dorogobongr
    -9
    -11.25
    11.75
    14 Nov
    Smolensk
    -21
    -26.25
    -15.25
    20 Nov
    Botr
    -11
    -13.75
    7.25
    23 Nov
    Berezina River
    -20
    -25
    -13
      1 Dec
    Minsk
    -24
    -30
    -22
      6 Dec
    Molodeczno
    -30
    -37.5
    -35.5
      7 Dec
    Vilna
    -26
    -32.5
    -25.6
  • Charles Booth's Inquiry into the Life and Labour of the People in London, undertaken between 1886 and 1903 was one of several surveys of working class life carried out in the 19th century. It is the only survey for which the original notes and data have survived and therefore provides a unique insight into the development of the philosophy and methodology of social investigation in the United Kingdom.
    Robert Park: From 1887 to 1898 Park worked for daily newspapers in Minnesota, Detroit, Denver, New York, and Chicago. He was soon given special assignments to cover the urban scene, often in depth through a series of articles. He wrote on city machines and the corruption they brought in their wake. He described the squalid conditions of the city's immigrant areas and the criminal world that was ensconced there.http://www.bolender.com/Dr.%20Ron/SOC4044%20Sociological%20Theory/Class%20Sessions/Sociological%20Theory/Park,%20Robert%20Ezra/park,_robert_ezra.htm
  • Manhattan Timeformations: a computer model which simultaneously presents a layered, cartographic history of the lower half of Manhattan Island, and an exploded time line chronicling the real estate development of high-rise office buildings, which constitute the skylines of Midtown and Downtown Manhattan. Be sure to click “Next” to see all the forms.
  • Same data base but now the map has been rotated 180-degrees, just as though a helicopter were flying over the city and its passengers were trying out various spatical hunches.
    Human brain can often see connections that the computers might not be programmed to recognize. But vice-versa is also true.
  • 3D display of crimes against taxi drivers
    Note: Layers
    Vertical “pins” used to display specific incidents in all variable layers
    Pin connected to multi-variable – and often non-geographic -- database
  • Techniques and tools to visualize dynamic processes like Web usage are poorly developed. In this issue of Map of the Month we look at the work of one of the leading researchers trying to overcome this weakness, through the use of the concept of organic information design. His name is Ben Fry and he works in the MIT Media Lab, where he is busy creating innovative adaptive visualizations of how people use websites. http://mappa.mundi.net/maps/maps_022/
  • The digital magazine of InfoVis.net.
    [Number 113]
    Visualising Social Interaction
    by Juan C. Dürsteler
    Social interaction provides us with visual patterns that help us to situate ourselves in our environment. In Internet, however, this doesn’t happen so easily. Some visualisations are appearing to remedy the problem.
    See the illustrated version of this issue at http://www.infovis.net/E-zine/2003/num_113.htm
    Social interaction produces many visual patterns we are so used to that we don’t notice them. But they provide us with indispensable information in order for us to navigate our social environment.
    Some of these patterns deal with the flux of human activity, like the colourful scene of the bathers in a swimming pool or the appearance of the mushroom-shaped silhouettes of the umbrellas in a rainy afternoon. They allow us to situate and to coordinate our behaviour with that of the environment. Haven’t you ever felt strange dressed in a dinner jacket on a nudist beach, or wearing a swimming suit at a Christmas party?
    Other visual patterns are related to affiliation, like the one made up of the business suits getting off a commuter train early in the morning. We create these and many other patterns just by standing where we stand and being what we are. This is what some call “social weather” http://www.kottke.org/02/09/020930social_weath.html, something that you can feel immediately in a soccer match where it can sometimes be really stormy depending on the results of the local team...
    But in cyberspace the social interaction is becoming more and more important and we don’t have the indicators that the visualisation of our immediate environment provides. For example, when we are at the office a simple look around at our environment allows us to know who is present and who isn’t, the ones that are interacting and the ones that are buried in solitary work.
    Not so in Internet where it’s not easy to know what the social network we are interacting with is like, who is doing what and where the social magma we are incorporated in goes.
    Some initiatives are working on this in order to remedy the situation. We already spoke about chat visualisation in issue 46 (http://www.infovis.net/E-zine/num_46.htm) or about digital cities in issue 102 (http://www.infovis.net/E-zine/2002/num_102.htm), But there’s still more:
    A good starting point is Judith Donat’s PhD thesis , http://smg.media.mit.edu/people/Judith/Thesis/. Donath works for MIT Media Lab and is one of the most active researchers in this field. For her, one of cyberspace’s most important problems is the absence of a body that in the social reality provides us with the possibility of
    * Expression: Verbal but mainly non verbal. How we move, how we dress.
    * Presence. Where we are, with whom, in which social circle we are moving.
    * Control. Social control of individuals has been centred on the body but it is lacking in cyberspace...
    * Recognition. Typically associated to the face, it allows us to assert the others identity.
    So that many of the visualisations are centred on the representation of
    * presence, how many there are
    * identity, who they are
    * interaction in abstract, who relates to whom
    * conversation as exchange of messages
    The most evident schemes draw the social networks as graphs, i.e. nodes representing the actors and lines or arrows that represent the link between them. One of the most well known is the typical organization chart of a company. A more advanced example http://www.mpi-fg-koeln.mpg.de/%7Elk/netvis/SocMorph.html shows the so called Hxaro practice of exchanging gifts among the members of the ¡Kung culture in Botswana and Namibia.
    Chat Circles http://chatcircles.media.mit.edu/ by Fernanda Viegas, is a chat where your presence is revealed by a coloured circle, you have a history of the conversation in the form of a line with transversal bars proportional in length to the duration of every message. Your presence leaves a trace that vanishes slowly taking about 10 hours in the process.
    We have also seen in issues 65, 66 and 67 the visualisation of the visits to a web site, but Nelson Minar offers us a different perspective in http://xenia.media.mit.edu/~nelson/research/crowdvis/. Every visitor is a coloured point close to the web page he/she is visiting.
    Visual Who, http://persona.www.media.mit.edu/Judith/VisualWho/, from Judith Donath, places the people in a space related to certain mailing lists. The colour of the names and their situation in space reveal the affinity with each of the lists. As new participants add new themes the morphology of the representation changes.
    IBM’s “Social Computing” group is also specially active. Babble http://www.research.ibm.com/SocialComputing/SCGpapers.htm is a chat visualiser that represent every conversation as a circle where you find smaller inscribed circles that represent the individuals. The more in the periphery the less active in the conversation, the closer they are, the more involved in mutual conversation.
    As we can see there are multiple ongoing initiatives. Nevertheless and despite the activity deployed by Donath’s group, IBM and other groups and the richness of some representations, I’ve got the impression that we still have a long road ahead before we can interact on the Net with a visual support so rich and versatile so as to allow the deployment of the abundant resources of social interaction we are used to in the real world.
    ------
    This article has seen the light thanks to a conversation with Ben Hyde http://hydesign.blogspot.com who was also kind enough to provide a handful of links, some of which you can find attached.
    Sociable Media Group MIT
    http://smg.media.mit.edu/
    Contact map
    http://hci.stanford.edu/cs377/nardi-schiano/netWORK%26ContactMap.pdf
    Bonnie Nardi
    http://www.darrouzet-nardi.net/bonnie/
    Virtual Playground: Architectures for a Shared Virtual World http://www.hitl.washington.edu/publications/r-98-12/
    Orgnet's - Inflow software see: http://radio.weblogs.com/0114726/2003/01/02.html#a176
    Jonathan Schull's Macroscope Manifesto
    http://radio.weblogs.com/0104369/stories/2002/04/09/macroscope022702.htm
    IdeasBazaar
    http://www.ideasbazaar.co.uk/Linkship.pps
    http://www.ideasbazaar.co.uk/blog/archives/cat_networks.html#000048
    Spring
    http://www.usercreations.com/spring/
    visual p-wiki's
    http://c2.com/cgi/tour
    http://phpwiki.sourceforge.net/phpwiki/VisualWiki
  • Transcript

    1. • American (3) • Malaysia (2) • Italian (2) • English • Chinese • German • Scotish • Indian • Japanese • Persian
    2. Google Earth
    3. Case Studies• Rosa Parks • Arab Americans/ Iraqi People Visual Imagery • Expending our Learning Spaces • Why Vote • Slavery across cultures throughout history • Native Americans • Scientist • Map • Solar System • Who is Woodrow Wilson? • Thanksgiving- God in Public School • Elections
    4. Expansion of the Learning Spaces School/ Classroom Computer Lab Library Museums/ Zoos/ Aquariums Hallways/ Informal meeting areas Virtual Learning Environment Internet- Cyber café Media (Books, Videos, TV) Dinning Halls Athletic Fields/ Playground Multi-use spaces Project rooms Field Trips/ Outdoors My Room
    5. MAKE A DIFFERENCE VIDEO  http://www.makeadifferencemovie.com/
    6. MULTICULTURAL EDUCATION: LEVELS OF TRANSFORMATION  Transformation of self (What am I contributing to the inequities, consciously or unconsciously?)  Transformation of schools and schooling (Pedagogy, curriculum, classroom climate, counseling practices, testing, etc.)  Transformation of society
    7. MULTICULTURAL INTERNET 1. Inclusive teaching and learning 2. Interactive teaching and learning 3. Collaborative teaching and learning
    8.  “Other” voices  Excerpts from Slave Narratives  Native American Documents Project  Student Voices  Multicultural Graffiti  Voices of Women  Redefining “interactive”  Eye Witness: A North Korean Remembers  Sidney Finkel’s Page  DiversityWeb Discussion Forums  Collaboration among educators  DiversityWeb Leader’s Guide  PedagoNet  Collaborative Projects  Multicultural Song Index  Multicultural Passport
    9. TEACHER’S ROLE Education must begin with the solution of the teacher-student contradiction, by reconciling the poles of the contradiction so that both are simultaneously teachers and students. Paulo Freire
    10.  http://www.rootsweb.com/~sdbrule/contract.jpg  http://www.rootsweb.com/~wishawan/powell.html  http://instruct.uwo.ca/edu/500-001/french/contrac2.htm  http://www.schenectadyhistory.org/education/teachercontract
    11. TEACHER’S ROLE • Education must begin with the solution of the teacher-student contradiction, by reconciling the poles of the contradiction so that both are simultaneously teachers and students. Paulo Freire
    12. MULTIPLE IDENTITIES
    13. E-IDENTITIES mnyildiz@gmail.com Skype: MeldaYildiz MSN Mnyildiz@hotmail.com yildizm@wpunj.edu yildizmny@yahoo.com myildiz@lesley.edu Second Life: Melda Torok Facebook: Melda Yildiz Digg: http://digg.com/users/mnyildiz NING: http://mnyildiz.ning.com/ WIKI: http://mny.wikispaces.com/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/myildiz
    14. How to Teach Media Literacy
    15. 03/31/15 Willi am Pate rson Univ ersit y 38 http://www.ncrel.org/
    16. WHAT IS SECOND LIFE?  The life you live after you die  Life you experience online  No idea!
    17. I w to use Wikipedia for academia
    18. Source: http://xkcd.com/256
    19. • The first Wiki, WikiWikiWeb, was created by Ward Cunningham in 1995 • Named after Hawaiian bus service, Wiki Wiki • Allows users to easily create and edit Web pages using any Web browser • Encourages democratic use of Web Source: http://wiki.org/wiki.cgi?WhatIsWiki WHAT IS A WIKI?
    20. “Wikipedia is a great place to start, not end, your research” Dr. Alex Halavais http://alex.halavais.net
    21. TEEN SECOND LIFE- SOCIAL SOFTWARE-
    22. How to Teach Media Literacy
    23.  http://mny.wikispaces.com/Web2.0  What is Voicethread- http://voicethread.com/#u76341.b409.i848804 What does a networked teacher mean to you? http://voicethread.com/#q.b67978.i350123 Please feel free to add your voice using the Record Button WEB 2.0
    24. FOLLOW THE DRINKING GUARD  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cn4DtlZ8FSc  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2c4dSY5ZWn8&feature=related  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTd29tLQ3h0 Lyrics  http://www.followthedrinkinggourd.org/What_The_Lyrics_Mean.htm  http://www.songsforteaching.com/folk/followthedrinkinggourd.htm  http://www.classicsforkids.com/shows/freedom.asp Children Books- http://www.followthedrinkinggourd.org/Appendix_Childrens_Books.htm
    25. SOCIAL SOFTWARE
    26.  Videos to watch and (optional- extended activity) post reactions on this blog page. http://yaz2008.blogspot.com/ Power of Digital Storytelling- http://mnyildiz.googlepages.com/digitalstorytelling There are some students projects on youtube- http://mnyildiz.googlepages.com/ Teddy Stallard Story- http://www.makeadifferencemovie.com/ Blue Ribbon Story http://www.blueribbonmovie.com/ on you tube- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN_LPTNQEqM&eurl=http://www.bl background video on you tube- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytmv9awy-H8&feature=related text version- http://www.blueribbons.org/blue_ribbon_story.shtml Google Earth- http://earth.google.com/ Second Life- online virtual world - http://secondlife.com/ / Teen Life (open to 13-18 years old)- http://teen.secondlife.com/ http://www.slideshare.net/mnyildiz/nj-tesol2008/ http://voicethread.com/share/95370/
    27. LEARN ONE THING!Language Arts Literacy  STANDARD 3.5 (VIEWING AND MEDIA LITERACY) ALL STUDENTS WILL ACCESS, VIEW, EVALUATE, AND RESPOND TO PRINT, NONPRINT, AND ELECTRONIC TEXTS AND RESOURCES.  http://www.state.nj.us/njded/cccs/s3_lal.htm#35
    28. REASONS USING NEW MEDIA Provides:  Access-- Liberate teachers and students from textbook format. Provide alternative resources- Teachers and students will be able to research through online resources.  Global Point of View-- Students and teachers will participate online discussion groups, weblogs, wikis, and listservs.  New tools for classrooms– Students and teachers will be able to produce media presentations, learning objects, interactive teaching material.
    29. COURSE HAS THREE MAIN PARTS  De-construct: (Read Media) Media Literacy Activities (deconstructing webpages, news, advertisement, and newspapers; POV (point of view) exercise, etc.)  Research: (Use Media) Information Literacy (Library Skills, researching internet resources, etc.)  Construct: (Write Media) Media Production (Create an oral history project, video documentary, website, webquest, weblog, and multimedia presentation)
    30. WHAT IS A “CLICKER”?  Personal Response System (PRS)  Audience Response System (ARS)  Classroom Performance System (PRS)  Small, handheld gadget that allows audiences and students to participate in presentations or lectures by submitting responses to interactive questions & viewing the responses as a graph www.turningtechnologies.com
    31. IS IT? 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 1. A- Front 2. B- Back 3. C- Side 4. D-Window 5. E- Middle
    32. HTTP://TEACHER.SCH
    33.  See the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HqK7fOA56bc&search=  watch and identify and respond  what they sell?  a) Pepsi b) God c) Beauty d) Youth e) all  who is their target audience?  a) you b) hispanic c) global d) young people
    34. WHAT ARE THEY SELLING Youth Beauty Pepsi God All 0% 0% 0%0%0% 1. Youth 2. Beauty 3. Pepsi 4. God 5. All
    35. YEH- SHEN: A CINDERELLA STORY FROM CHINA
    36. CIRCLE OF LIFE
    37. LOW SELF-ESTEEM “92% of girls want to change at least one aspect of their appearance.Dove believes all girls deserve to see how beautiful they really are and is committed to raising self- esteem in girls everywhere. That's why we created the Dove Self- Esteem Fund.” (www.campaignforrealbeauty.com)
    38. HTTP://WWW.THRIVEONCREATIVE.COM/CLIENTS/SEEJANE.ORG/PDFS/WHERE.THE.GIRLS.AR ‘  The study examined 101 animated and live-action films made from 1990 to 2004. It found only 28 per cent of speaking characters were female and, in crowd scenes, only 17 per cent were female. • Among the films studied were Finding Nemo, The Lion King, Monsters, Inc., Chicken Run, The Princess Diaries, Babe, The Santa Clause 2 and Toy Story.
    39. THE STUDY, WHERE THE GIRLS AREN'T  Children's films devalue women by making most characters male, says Geena Davis  http://enjoyment.independent.co.uk/film/news/article345283.ece
    40.   Half the Population, a Fifth of the News     By Sanjay Suri     Inter Press Service      Wednesday 15 February 2006      London - More and more women are now reporting the news, but still only about a fifth of the subjects are women, a new survey shows.      "What we see in news subjects is that whilst women make up 52 percent of the world's population, they make up only 21 percent of news subjects," Anna Turley from the World Association for Christian Communication (WACC) told IPS. WACC is a non-governmental organisation that promotes communication for social change.  http://www.truthout.org/issues_06/021506WA.shtml
    41. As we enter the twenty first century, it is essential that the schools be places that help students better understand the complex, symbol-rich culture in which they live in. A new vision of literacy is essential if educators are serious about the broad goals of education: preparing students to function as informed and effective citizens in a democratic society; preparing students to realize personal fulfillment; and preparing students to function effectively in a rapidly changing world that demands new, multiple literacies. Renee Hobbs, 1997
    42. It is no longer enough to simply read and write. Students must also become literate in the understanding of visual images. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliché and distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter, important news from coverage. Ernest Boyer
    43. Media Education is both essential to the exercising of our democratic rights and a necessary safeguard against the worst excesses of media manipulation for political purposes. Len Masterman
    44. The aim is to develop an awareness about print and the newer technologies of communications so that we can orchestrate them, …. And get the best out of each in the educational process. Without understanding of media languages and grammars, we cannot hope to achieve a contemporary awareness of the world in which we live. Marshall McLuhan
    45. A democratic civilization will save itself only if it makes the language of the image into a stimulus for critical reflection, not an invitation to hypnosis. Umberto Eco (l979)
    46. TEACHER’S ROLE Education must begin with the solution of the teacher-student contradiction, by reconciling the poles of the contradiction so that both are simultaneously teachers and students. Paulo Freire
    47. STATISTICS  In political Washington, Statistics are weapons of war. That’s why they get manipulated, massaged, and twisted until any connection to reality is strictly coincidental. Peter Carlson
    48.  CNN.com posted misleading graph showing poll results on Schiavo case  http://mediamatters.org/items/200503220005
    49. THE TRUTH BUT NOT THE WHOLE TRUTH
    50. WHICH GRAPHIC SHOWS POPULATION GROWTH IN 3RD QTR ON THE EAST?
    51. WHICH ONE? 1stgraph 2nd graph No difference 100% 0%0% 1. 1st graph 2. 2nd graph 3. No difference
    52. THE V SIGN
    53. V FOR VICTORY Winston Churchill gives the victory sign at a political rally, Liverpool, 1951
    54. The "V" for victory that Winston Churchill used (with the palm facing outward, same as the American sign for "peace"), when the palm is reversed, it means something else... If a person used two fingers to order two beers in a British pub.. it has insulting connotations…
    55. # 2 the two fingers in a 1st grade math class may refer to the number "two"
    56. OK (OKAY) VS. 0K (ZERO KILOBYTE)
    57. THIS SIGN MIGHT MEAN  "OK" in the United States  "money" in Japan  "sex" in Mexico  "homosexual" in Ethiopia  an obscenity in Brazil  “Zero” in Southern France
    58. VOCABULARY AVERAGE OF A 14- YEAR-OLD DROPPED FROM 25,000 WORDS IN 1950S TO ONLY 10,000 WORDS IN 1999. “Numbers.” Time Magazine 155, no 6 (Feb 14, 2000); 25 Vocabulary Average for 14-Year-Old 25,000 10,000 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 Year NumberofVocabulary Vocabulary Rate Vocabulary Rate 25,000 10,000 1950 1999
    59. WHAT THIS RESULTS TELL US? BLAME somebody or something  No parent involvement?  Too much TV/ New media  No enough reading Or question the data?  Who did the research?  Who sponsored it?  Who were the participants?
    60.  We may simply say language evolves?  Today, we cannot read and understand old English ?  We may also argue that our students are not learning another language…
    61. PRESIDENT BUSH'S CABINET  http://www.whitehouse.gov/government/cabinet.html
    62. John Roberts Samuel Alito
    63. MEDIA LITERACY QUIZ FROM  http://www.griid.org/pdfs/medialit-exercise-01.pdf  http://www.griid.org/pdfs/medialit-exercise-04.pdf
    64. The trouble…is that we have taken our democracy for granted; we have thought and acted as if our forefathers had founded it once and for all. We have forgotten that it has to be enacted anew in every generation. John Dewey
    65. What do they have in common?
    66. They are Arab- Americans http://www.aaiusa.org/famous_arab_americans.htm http://www.aaiusa.org/PDF/Cas.Broch.(AAIF-V).pdf Test your knowledge- http://www.aaiusa.org/resources/421/test-your-knowledge
    67. Oh I come from a land, from a faraway place Where the caravan camels roam Where it's flat and immense And the heat is intense It's barbaric, but hey, it's home { Original first verse (1992-93): Oh I come from a land, from a faraway place Where the caravan camels roam Where they cut off your ear If they don't like your face It's barbaric, but hey, it's home }
    68.  Watch Full Circle  http://homepage.mac.com/hbarrett/eportfolio s/iMovieTheater63.html View the clips provided on the links and write what do they sell? who is the target audience?  Truth About http://youtube.com/watch?v=ShDoxve85jI  I am Canadian: http://youtube.com/watch?v=E4Nw3qlXOJo
    69. "I learned how to deconstruct commercials, how to use the camera equipment, and how to create a public service announcement. Most importantly, I experienced that every message can be interpreted differently. Depending on the era, personal experience, each sign makes different meaning to different people. Prior to taking this course, I simply watched a commercial at face value. I never really looked at the details or asked myself what target audience the advertising company was aiming for. Since class, I have been a commercial-analyzing junkie. I look at the color scheme, the logo, the endorser (if there is one), choice of music, and the intended target audience.”
    70. “I am happy to have met you, because you have given me much more to think about than just the content of this class. … More than learning video production, this course gave me the chance to reflect on my own viewing habits and I learned something about myself.”
    71. Web 2.0: Imagine the Possibilities
    72. LET’S END THE INSANITY
    73. BLOGGING IN EDUCATION
    74. THE PRESENTATION WAS BENEFICIAL TO MY UNDERSTANDING OF THE MILLENNIALS AND THEIR NEEDS. True False A bstain 0% 0%0% 1. True 2. False 3. Abstain
    75. I HAVE ENJOYED THIS PRESENTATION. Yes N o A bstain 0% 0%0% 1. Yes 2. No 3. Abstain
    76. The trouble…is that we have taken our democracy for granted; we have thought and acted as if our forefathers had founded it once and for all. We have forgotten that it has to be enacted anew in every generation. John Dewey
    77.  Watch Full Circle  http://homepage.mac.com/hbarrett/eportfolio s/iMovieTheater63.html View the clips provided on the links and write what do they sell? who is the target audience?  Truth About http://youtube.com/watch?v=ShDoxve85jI  I am Canadian: http://youtube.com/watch?v=E4Nw3qlXOJo
    78.  School Room in Wagner, Oklahoma, circa 1920.
    79. NINE DOTS AND FOUR LINES THE PROBLEM: WITHOUT TAKING YOUR PEN OFF THE PAPER, DRAW FOUR STRAIGHT LINES SUCH THAT ALL NINE DOTS ARE INTERSECTED.
    80.  Remember to THINK outside of the BOX  To solve this problem, think outside of the dots.
    81. MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS READING VARIOUS GEOGRAPHY TEXT BOOKS DURING CASS IN 1927, AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO LABORATORY SCHOOL. EMPHASIS ON MEMORIZATION. DIFFICULT TO LAYER DATA
    82. DATABASE “NOT EASY TO INTERPRET”
    83. VISUALIZATION “WORTH A THOUSAND WORDS”
    84. IN NEW YORK CITY:  GIS is used to enable policy makers to more easily detect patterns pertaining to:  Census demographics  Public health concerns  Crime  Tax rates  Transportation routes  Pollution levels  Real estate development  Weather patterns  Gas/electric power consumption  The impact of various types of natural and human made disasters
    85. 2004 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION  Example of a cartogram map in which the size of the states have been rescaled according to their population. That is, states are drawn with a size proportional not to their sheer topographic acreage
    86. HOW IS GIS BEING USED IN CLASSROOMS?  Learning about GIS: Focus on learning the software Teacher is “sage at the stage” Focus on procedural tasks vs  Learning with GIS: Focus on learning subject matter Project based learning Problem solving Community based interaction Authentic assessment
    87. JOHN DEWEY: “I believe that….much of present education fails because it neglects the fundamental principle of the school as a form of community life.” (Dewey, 1929)
    88. NEW WAYS TO THINK ABOUT DATA COLLECTION:  Who collected the data?  What was collected and what was neglected?  Where was the data collected?  When was the data collected?  Why was it collected?  How was the data collected?
    89. TODAY’S OBJECTIVES/ASSUMPTIONS  Journalists:  Take in Data Analyze Data  Communicate Findings  GIS is a tool for  Analyzing data pertaining to most any phenomena  Communicating the results of that analysis 154
    90. TODAY’S OBJECTIVES/ASSUMPTIONSDigital Revolution triggers major power shift from authorities/institutions to citizens Shift means journalists and social scientists have to be better at using the data and tools to… Make sense out of various phenomena Tell the stories reflecting our analysis and interpretation in a manner better than citizens can do on their own. 155
    91. KEY POINTS  GIS is a rich, challenging tool that must be employed throughout the media organization and in a cooperative way. - Demands/promotes shared learning and insights.  A terrific “I didn’t know that!” device for managers, journos and readers 156
    92. PROTO-GIS: NAPOLEON'S MARCH TO MOSCOW 157 Drawn by Charles Joseph Minard in 1861; reputed to be the best statistical graphic ever drawn.
    93. PROTO-GIS: BOOTH’S LONDON 1898  Charles Booth’s Map of London (c. 1886-1903) http://booth.lse.ac.uk/ 158
    94. USATODAY 159
    95. USATODAY 160
    96. MAPPING WAR AND WAR COVERAGE  Iraq War Resources (From GIS Development online magazine) http://www.gisdevelopment.net/iraq.htm  CNN Maps http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/1998/iraq/iraq.maps/ Early form (c. 1998) Marginally helpful: no scale, no date, no sources Today improved: http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/2003/iraq/maps/  BBC - http://www.esgeo.com/baghdad/baghdad.html 161
    97. TRENDS: ANIMATED MAPPING  Maps and images that can be controlled, on the WWW, by the user.  Emphasis is on controlled layering e.g. EPA Interactive Web Mapping  Note, the graphics are tied, in a fundamental way, to the database. Any map is only as good as the database used to create it. (Problems with “sex offender” dB)  Manhattan Timeformations: http://www.skyscraper.org/timeformations/animation. html 162
    98. 3DTAXICRIMEMAPVIEW2 163 Rotated 3D view of Taxi Crime
    99. 3DTAXICRIMEMAPVIEW1 164 3D view of Taxi Crime
    100. TRENDS: CONCEPT MAPPING Intellectual – or conceptual space -- geography How are ideas related? How are people or places with or tied to ideas/concepts related?  Where is cyberspace? How to map it? Atlas of Cyberspace Web Mapping http://www.cybergeography.org/atlas/web_sites.html  Mapping how people use a web site http://mappa.mundi.net/maps/maps_022/  Show me the Power Players in a society? http://theyrule.orgo.org/ 165
    101. TRENDS: WEB SITE CONTENT MAP 166
    102. TRENDS: FRY’S WEB SITE MAP 167 Ben Fry's anemone visualization of website usage
    103. TRENDS: POWERPLAYERS1 168 http://theyrule.orgo.org/
    104. MAPPING CONCEPTS  They Rule: http://www.theyrule.net/  Valdis: http://www.orgnet.com/leftright.html  TouchGraph: http://www.blogstreet.com/visualneighborhood.html  Historical Maps: http://www.cybergeography.org/atlas/historical.html AlphaWorld: http://www.activeworlds.com/  AlphaWorld Map: http://www.cybergeography.org/atlas/muds_vw.html  AlphaWorld B&W http://mapper.activeworlds.com/aw/densmap-anim.html  AlphaWorld Animation http://fargo.itp.tsoa.nyu.edu/~cs97/tan2002/map.html 169
    105. HOW REPORTERS USE GIS  Weather Hurricane Andrew  Census analysis/story telling USAToday http://www.usatoday.com/news/census/index.htm  Crime mapping Crime Mapping Research Center http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/nij/maps/ Crime mapping tutorial http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACJD/cmtutorial.html  Story telling, economics, education, urban development, taxation, voting patterns, environment, traffic 170
    106. THE PRESENTATION TODAY WAS BENEFICIAL TO MY UNDERSTANDING OF HOW TO USE CLICKERS IN TEACHING. True False A bstain 0% 0%0% 1. True 2. False 3. Abstain
    107. I HAVE ENJOYED THIS PRESENTATION. 1. Yes 2. No 3. Abstain
    108. HOW DO YOU RATE THISHOW DO YOU RATE THIS PRESENTATION?PRESENTATION? 1. A 2. B 3. C
    109. CONCEPT MAPS Concept mapping is a technique for visualizing the relationships among different concepts. A concept map is a diagram showing the relationships among concepts. Use Graphic Organizers/ Concepts Maps For: • Brainstorming • Organizing • Prewriting • Concept Mapping • Planning • Outlining • Diagramming • Webbing • Project Development • Administrative Tasks • Charting
    110. ANOTHER EXAMPLE- ONLINE CM Source: http://trumpet.sdsu.edu/m345/Knowledge_Webs/2Arab_MusicY/Arab_music.h tm#text

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