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Nj Tesol2008

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  • During the technology session, students used Comic Life Software by Plasq to create comics that merged visual images with the text. Students worked on Macintosh computers to learn the Comic Life Deluxe Software. Comic life has a simple interface. This software application can be used to create greeting cards, photo albums, story books, instructional handouts and brochures, storyboarding video projects, and comics or graphic novels. The Comic Life Software provided students with the opportunity to create their own comic in digital form. The software had options for creating comics with different page layouts with boxes, images, and text. There are many different filters, effects, word/thought balloons, templates, fonts that can be applied to create almost any type of document and turn text and images into a comic. The students completed two projects using the Comic Life Software. The first project required that students write a comic strip about themselves. Students created narratives about their lives and used the software to produce a comic version of the story. During lab time, student used techniques learned from the book Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud to explore concepts such as templates for manga and graphic novels. The second project students created with the Comic Life Software was the group project previously described where they created their own graphic piece about a contemporary, controversial social issue. Using Popular Culture to Promote Reading and Writing We found that all of the students were engaged while completing their tasks. While working with the Comic Life Software, students dragged and dropped various images onto the page to digitally alter photos and graphics to look like comic drawings. None of the students used the computer to draw images. Most of the images students used were downloaded from the Internet, pictures they saved on their UB drives, or pictures downloaded from a personalized flickr.com site, which was established to store pictures students were taking in class using a digital camera. Some of the students drew their own illustrations and scanned them into the computer. We learned that few of the students who used the digital camera to take pictures to upload into their project were familiar with how to upload pictures to the computer. With guidance from faculty members, all of the students were able to successfully do this task by the third week. Because the few students who owned computers did not have access to Macintosh computers at home, they exported their comics as HTML, images, or QuickTime files and emailed it to themselves. All of the students also printed hard copies of their comics to share with the class during their final presentation on the last day of the program. While creating individual comic strips, the students created title and speech bubbles in a variety of styles. They experimented with elements of the comic medium. Some students included speech bubbles outside of the frame and captions in order to provide the reader with additional information about the story—these elements are often seen in comics. Other students were able to add text and bubbles with relative ease. We observed that this was often the first thing they did when they started working on a comic template. The students also tested how to alter their images and change them to comic form, but most of them left their pictures unfiltered in the final product. Students also worked in groups to complete a second comic project. Students were randomly assigned to groups ranging in size from 2 to 4 members. Each group selected a topic, relating to social justice. As previously mentioned, the issue of social justice emerged because it was one of the focus areas of the program. Each group selected a contemporary issue they knew little about. Once a topic was chosen, the groups researched this issue before creating their informational comic about the topic. The students created a 5 to 6 panel comic strip using the Comic Life Software by synthesizing and summarizing information obtained through research. Some modeling and guidance occurred in small groups where faculty members provided students with one-on-one support. For example, when a group appeared to be having difficulty obtaining sources in the computer lab, one faculty member walked over to provide them with assistance:   These students were interested in researching and raising awareness in their readers about the topic of modern slavery. Students researched this issue and then chose a few key facts from their research to incorporate into this comic. It appears that this group then linked their background knowledge of slavery in the United States, prior to the civil war, to the issue of modern slavery. They searched the Internet and found relevant pictures to incorporate into their comic. We found that by the third session, (4.5 hours of work), this group had researched and discussed the issue, obtained relevant graphics, and completed a comic which demonstrated their knowledge about the subject and linked it with to prior knowledge. We learned that students’ in-class experiences led them to engage in more in-depth and evaluative conversations of issues in the larger society by making connections across texts. In their research and creating their graphic novels, they did beyond google search, improved their media and information literacy skills. Thank you so much for viewing this video. Please email yildizm@wpunj.edu if you would like to have the link to youtube.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Melda N. Yildiz, Ed.D. [email_address] William Paterson University Integrating Technology
    • 2.  
    • 3.
      • Link to youtube videos
      • Introduction:
      • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b_83FgdOlM0&feature=related
    • 4.  
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    • 10. Scott McCloud in his book ‘ Understanding Comics ‘ defines comics as: “ sequential art”. The purpose of using sequential art is to help readers develop empathy through dramatic narration and illustration.
    • 11. SCOTT MCCLOUD’S ONLINE COMIC TUTORIAL http://www.scottmccloud.com/comics/icst/icst-3/icst-3.html
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    • 15. PANELS TEMPLATES GUTTERS CAPTIONS BALLOONS blog.oofn.net/2006/02/04/comic-fun/ COMIC’S COMPONENTS
    • 16. http://mediacast.sun.com/users/~MartinHardee/media/ComicsDot9-1.pdf Business Application - COMIC MANUAL:
    • 17. A weekly (and weakly funny) comic about IT outsourcing, written by Sandeep Sood and drawn by Aron Bothman. www.doubtsource.com
    • 18. COMIC ADVERTISING (1832): http://bugpowder.com/andy/e.advertising.html Using comics in advertising is an old strategy that may be on the verge of a revival, in part to the rising popularity of graphic novels. Comic strips in advertising peaked in popularity in the 1930's and 1940's, catering largely to people whose grasp of English was poor, but could follow the actions of comic strip characters.
    • 19. Comics are now a well established tool in the education and training field. Using sequential art, more commonly known as comic strips shows learners the larger picture. Through a visual portrayal of thoughts, sounds, actions, and ideas, training materials are turned into effective lessons that keep people engaged. Health Application – Diet Foods
    • 20. BLOG COMIC : http://alwaysright.comicgenesis.com/d/20070402.html
    • 21. COMIC BASED WEBSITE http://www.adcodiamond.com/panel2.htm
    • 22. Photo comics using video frames
    • 23. USING TOYS FOR PROPS
    • 24. The importance of dialogue and image composition
    • 25. A PHOTO NOVEL http://prisonbrest.free.fr/html/index2.htm
    • 26. GRAPHIC NOVEL
    • 27. http://www.melissaclifton.com/tutorial-comicbook.html PHOTOSHOP PHOTO COMIC ART
    • 28. http://www.trap17.com/index.php/photo-comic_t31873.html PHOTOSHOP PHOTO COMIC ART
    • 29. http://www.photoshoproadmap.com/Photoshop-blog/2007/09/13/give-your-photos-a-retro-comic-book-effect/ PHOTOSHOP PHOTO COMIC ART
    • 30. Photoshop Comic Art Effects http://www.macmerc.com/articles/Graphics_Tips/209
    • 31. http://homepage.mac.com/krbishop/comiclife/ PHOTOSHOP PHOTO COMIC ART
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    • 34. Melda N. Yildiz, Ed.D. [email_address] William Paterson University
    • 35.  

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