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An Intro to Copyright for Educators v5
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An Intro to Copyright for Educators v5 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. An Introduction to
  • 2. Think of the song playing during the opening slide. What song was it and by what artist?
  • 3. a form of protection … to the authors of “original works”
  • 4. Reason for Copyright In groups, try to decide why copyright laws exist.
  • 5. Reason for Copyright Copyright laws are based on the belief that if people are compensated for their original work, that the compensation will encourage more creative, original works, and that society as a whole benefits from this (Starr, 2010).
  • 6. What is Copyrighted? Create two columns on a page and label one as items that can be copyrighted and label the other as items that cannot be copyrighted. Fill in each column with as many items as you can think of and be prepared to share.
  • 7. Why do all copyright lawyers like kings and queens? Because they are big fans of royalties. (Copyrightgirl, 2011)
  • 8. Public Domain Includes all materials that are not protected by copyright
  • 9. Internet and Copyright Copyright law governs most of the material on the internet (Harper, 2007). Most material on the internet is not in the public domain.
  • 10. Fair Use Fair use offers educators, researchers, and others to make reasonable and limited uses of copyrighted materials (Scholarship, n.d.).
  • 11. Fair Use Checklist The following checklist is a guide to determining fair use: http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyri ght/files/2009/10/fairusechecklist.pdf
  • 12. http://www.courtoons.net/2009/03/16/copyright/
  • 13. General Guidelines for Educators Under most circumstances, educators may copy: a single chapter an excerpt not exceeding two pages or 10 percent of the work up to 250 words or 10 percent of a longer work a single chart, graph, diagram, drawing, cartoon, or picture (Starr, 2010)
  • 14. General Guidelines for Educators Educators may NOT: make multiple copies as a substitute for purchase copy the same works for more than one semester or course copy the same work more than nine times in a single semester use copyrighted work for commercial purposes use copyrighted work without attributing the author. (Starr, 2010).
  • 15. US Copyright Basics Video http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=pl ayer_embedded&v=q9t8MZOB_tc&noredir ect=1#!
  • 16. Two General Rules to Remember 1. If you are not sure, ask for permission. 2. If you are taking away revenue from someone, you are probably violating copyright (although you can violate copyright without taking away revenue).
  • 17. References Cited Copyright. (2001). Rock machine. On The Hidden World. AMG. Copyrightgirl. (2011). Copyright (for) jokes? Copyright For Education. Retrieved June 17, 2013, from http://copyright4education.blogspot.com/2011/04/copyright-for- jokes.html ELearningExpert. (2012). U.S. copyright basics. Youtube. Retrieved June 6, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=q9 t8MZOB_tc#! Esoderberg. (2011). Copyright - all rights reserved image. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved June 24, 2013, from http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Copyright- _all_rights_reserved.png Harper, G. K. (2007). Copyright crash course. University of Texas Libraries. Retrieved May 29, 2013, from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/
  • 18. LumaxArt.com. (2011). Lumaxart gold guys with creative commons symbol image. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved June 27, 2013, from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LuMaxArt_Gold_Guys_With_Creati ve_Commons_Symbol.png Mills, D. (2009). Copyright. Courtoons. Retrieved June 17, 2013, from http://www.courtoons.net/2009/03/16/copyright/ Office, U. S. C. (2012). Copyright basics. Retrieved June 6, 2013, from http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ01.pdf Rock. (1997). Internet image. Wikimedia Commons. Retrieved June 24, 2013, from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Internet1.jpgScholarship, C. for D. R. and. (n.d.). Copyright, fair use, and education. Columbia University Library. Retrieved June 6, 2013, from http://copyright.columbia.edu/copyright/ Scindo. (2006). Copyright crystal black image. Retrieved June 10, 2013, from http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c8/Copyright_crystal_bl ack.png Starr, L. (2010). The educator’s guide to copyright and fair use. Education World. Retrieved June 6, 2013, from http://www.educationworld.com/a_curr/curr280.shtml Teaching copyright. (n.d.). Retrieved May 29, 2013, from http://www.teachingcopyright.org/ Unknown. (2012). Public domain image. Retrieved June 10, 2013, from http://pixabay.com/en/computer-icon-blue-copyright-31188/