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Web 2.0 on Speed

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XTech 2006 presentation: Web caching hasn’t significantly changed in years, and many believe it’s a casualty of a more dynamic, real-time “Web 2.0”. That doesn’t have to be the case; The current cycle …

XTech 2006 presentation: Web caching hasn’t significantly changed in years, and many believe it’s a casualty of a more dynamic, real-time “Web 2.0”. That doesn’t have to be the case; The current cycle of innovations brings new opportunities for massively scaling and distributing Web applications and services—if the right pieces are in place. This session shows what’s possible right now, and examines what the future of HTTP caching could be.

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  • zipf curves, self-similarity = flash crowds, consequences of popularity
















  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?
  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?
  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?
  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?
  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?
  • “Dynamic” content is usually just different content modules that have varying cacheability
    There isn’t much that isn’t cacheable at all
    IMG and Flash already have the ability to decompose; why not HTML?














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