Uploaded on

 

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
350
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4

Actions

Shares
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Center for Energy and Environment Technology Forum Steven Nadel, Executive Director American Council for an Energy- Efficient Economy Energy Efficiency: Present and Future June 2014
  • 2. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy • Non-profit research organization • Founded in 1980 • Now have 50 staff and $8 million/year budget • Funding comes from foundations, government agencies, contracts, conferences & corporate memberships
  • 3. U.S. Energy Use in Relation to GDP 1970-2012
  • 4. Energy Efficiency: America’s Greatest Energy Resource US Energy Resources used in 2011
  • 5. Electricity Use Declining 11 11.5 12 12.5 13 13.5 14 14.5 15 15.5 16 3300 3400 3500 3600 3700 3800 3900 4000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 BillionReal$ TWh Electricity GDP Source: ACEEE, 2014, “Why is Electricity Use No Longer Growing”
  • 6. Efficiency a Significant Cause Factors affecting Residential & Commercial sales 2007-2012 Source: ACEEE, 2014, “Why is Electricity Use No Longer Growing” * Statistically significant RelativeImpactonkWhpercapita
  • 7. 2013 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard Results
  • 8. Minnesota’s Scores Area Score Notes Utilities 15/20 Tied for 5th; lose 3.5 points on budgets, 1 point for electric savings, ½ point for lack of electric decoupling Transportation 2/9 Tied for 24th; lose 2 points each for GHG tailpipe standards, integration of transportation and land-use planning and VMT targets Building energy codes 3/7 Tied for 43rd; lose 3 points for stringency (does not yet use 2009 codes), 1 point for compliance Combined heat & power 1/5 Tied for 27th; lose 1 point for incentives and ½ point each for interconnection, RPS/EERS treatment, net metering, emissions & financing State govt, initiatives 4.5/7 Tied for 11th; lose 1 point each for building energy disclosure and R&D, ½ point for financial incentives Appliance stds. 0/2 Have no recent state standards
  • 9. Electric Savings of Leading States State 2011 Net Incremental Savings (MWh) % of 2011 Retail Sales Preliminary % of 2012 Retail Sales Vermont 117,940 2.12% 2.23% Massachusetts 789,894 1.43% 1.83% Arizona 1,028,378 1.38% 1.66% California 3,399,300 1.35% NA Connecticut 394,266 1.32% 1.09% Hawaii 130,108 1.31% NA New York 1,791,302 1.25% NA Rhode Island 96,009 1.25% 1.56% Ohio 1,880,629 1.22% NA Minnesota 818,512 1.21% 1.20% Maine 120,211 1.05% 1.36% Iowa 475,964 1.04% NA Pennsylvania 1,553,739 1.04% NA Michigan 1,000,437 1.00% 1.12% Oregon 465,211 0.99% 0.99% Maryland 397,748 0.58% 1.12%
  • 10. Levelized costs of new electricity resource options For 2012 13Source: ACEEE and Lazard Associates
  • 11. Natural Gas Efficiency, 2020 Northwest Regional Supply Curve Source: NW Energy 2009
  • 12. 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 8,000 9,000 10,000 OH GA AL PA NC FL IN WV VA SC TN MI IL WI KY MS MD NJ NV MO IA TX CO Announced Coal Retirements (MW) Ripe for Retirement (but not announced) (MW) TOTAL ANNOUNCED FROM THESE STATES = >35 GW TOTAL ANNOUNCED AND "RIPE" = > 88 GW Source: http://www.ucsusa.org/assets/documents/clean_energy/Ripe-for-Retirement-Full- Report.pdf Possible Coal Plant Retirements Source: Union of Concerned Scientists
  • 13. Potential Energy Savings From Energy Efficiency Minnesota Source: Hayes, S. et al. 2014. Change Is in the Air: How States Can Harness Energy Efficiency to Strengthen the Economy and Reduce Pollution. Washington, DC: American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. http://aceee.org/research-report/e1401
  • 14. Possible “Next Big Things” for Energy Efficiency • “Intelligent efficiency” – smart buildings, smart manufacturing • Improvements in new homes and appliances, leveraging codes & standards • Advanced lighting design • Strategic energy management for large customers (continuous improvement)
  • 15. Opportunities for Future Code Improvements
  • 16. Advanced Lighting Design
  • 17. Next Big Things (continued) • Combined heat and power systems • High-efficiency plug loads • Existing building retrofits (often staged) • Industrial process improvements • Advanced thermostats (e.g. Nest) • High efficiency commercial rooftop AC • Chiller replacements and optimization
  • 18. Combined Heat & Power • Higher efficiency than power plants when have uses for heat : • Factories • Large institutions • Lower natural gas prices make more attractive • Interest in critical facilities post- Sandy
  • 19. “Other” Loads With Large Savings Item TWh Saved from Upgrading Current Stock to the Best Televisions 62 Distribution transformers 47 PC’s 45 Ceiling fans 24 Computer monitors 18 Walk-in refrigeration 16 Set-top boxes 14 Video game consoles 9 DVD & Blu-ray players 8 Microwaves 8 Fume hoods 7 Computer servers 6 Source: Kwatra, ACEEE, 2013 iMac ME086 24 kWh/yr LG 42”, 75 kWh/yr
  • 20. Empire State Building Retrofit – 38% energy savings
  • 21. On-Bill Financing Five programs account for >90% of the volume Source: LBL/SEE Action May 2014 report
  • 22. Next Big Things (continued) • Providing actionable real-time info on energy use to consumers • Improved air and duct sealing • Advanced water heaters – condensing and heat pump • Conservation voltage reduction • LED lighting
  • 23. ACEEE Utility of the Future Study • Prepared several scenarios by region – might there be a “death spiral”? • Reviewed more than 50 studies and identified and assessed19 options • Make recommendations for the short, medium and long terms
  • 24. Electricity Sale Scenarios Midwest Reliability Organization (MRO) West (MN, IA, NB, SD, ND)
  • 25. Midwest Reliability Organization West Medium-high-change scenario
  • 26. Midwest Reliability Organization West High-change scenario
  • 27. Other Key Findings • If sales don’t increase, utilities need to look for other ways to grow profits • Optional services such as EE, EV charging, CHP and community-scale PV, using their existing expertise • EE low-cost resource and valued by customers • Be careful investing too much in new generation and T&D • Some will be needed, but prioritize
  • 28. Conclusions • Minnesota is close to the leaders, but needs to do more • Utility industry is changing – declining growth, 111(d), growing EE, PV and DG • Energy efficiency is a critical service to keep power prices in check and provide services customers want • Many potential big EE saving measures that utilities, manufacturers, service providers and end- users should pursue
  • 29. Contact Information Steven Nadel snadel@aceee.org 202-507-4000 www.aceee.org