Logic models and basic evaluation

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From Minnesota Campus Compact. An introduction to basic evaluation principles focusing on the value and limitations of logic models.

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Logic models and basic evaluation

  1. 1. LOGIC MODELS (AND OTHER BASIC EVALUATION IDEAS)
  2. 2. LOGIC MODEL - the graphic depiction of the relationship between your activities and their intended effects
  3. 3. Headache (SITUATION) Get Pills (INPUT) Take Pills (OUTPUT) Feel Better (OUTCOME)
  4. 4. Why use a logic model?
  5. 5. What is the situation? What are we going to do? PLANNING
  6. 6. Get everybody on the same page. Build understanding & promote consensus about what the program is and how it will work. Make your underlying assumptions explicit. Summarize complex projects to communicate with stakeholders and funders.
  7. 7. WHO is going to do WHAT, WHEN, WHY, and TO WHAT STANDARD?
  8. 8. Specific Measurable Attainable Realistic Timely
  9. 9. Limitations of Logic Models
  10. 10. They represent reality, but are not reality. Human relationships are not mathematical formulas.
  11. 11. Programs/projects are not linear. Nothing ever goes exactly as planned.
  12. 12. Logic models focus on expected outcomes, not on actual outcomes (positive or negative unintended consequences).
  13. 13. They have a tendency to assess what is easiest to measure rather than what is most valuable.
  14. 14. There can be causal attribution issues -- variables may not be isolated and many factors are influencing outcomes.
  15. 15. Logic models don’t address whether you are doing the right thing, only what you did.
  16. 16. Other Things to Remember
  17. 17. Your THEORY OF CHANGE should not be too complex.
  18. 18. "I think you should be more explicit here in step two." Cartoon by Sidney Harris Be realistic.
  19. 19. We tend to value what we measure, so we must be sure to measure what we value.
  20. 20. Never convey a number without a story; never a story without a number. Image: Sam Brown, http://www.explodingdog.com/
  21. 21. www.mncampuscompact.org

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