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Spring 2010l club drugs zach sal
 

Spring 2010l club drugs zach sal

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    Spring 2010l club drugs zach sal Spring 2010l club drugs zach sal Presentation Transcript

    • Club Drugs By: Salvador Perez and Zachary Zimmer
      • Club drugs tend to be used by teenagers and young adults at bars, nightclubs, concerts, and parties. Club drugs include GHB, Rohypnol, ketamine, and others. MDMA (Ecstasy), Methamphetamine, and LSD (Acid), are considered club drugs and are covered in their individual drug summaries.
      General Information
      • 007s - Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)
      • 2CB - Nexus
      • 69s - Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)
      • Banana split - Combination of 2C-B (Nexus) with other illicit substances, particularly LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide)
      • Batmans - Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)
      • Stars - Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)
      • Toonies - Nexus
      • Ya Ba - A pure and powerful form of methamphetamine from Thailand; "crazy drug"
      Street Names
    • Pictures
    • Effects
      • Club drugs have varying effects. Katamine distorts perception and produces feelings of detachment from the environment and self, while GHB and rohypnol are sedating. GHB abuse can cause coma and seizers. High doses of ketamine can cause delirium and amnesia. Rohypnol can incapacitate users and cause amnesia, and especially when mixed with alcohol, can be lethal.
    • Facts
      • The NIDA-funded 2008 Monitoring the Future Study showed that 0.5% of 8th graders, 0.4% of 10th graders, and 1.3% of 12th graders had abused Rohypnol®; 1.1% of 8th graders, 0.5% of 10th graders, and 1.2% of 12th graders had abused GHB; and 1.2% of 8th graders, 1.0% of 10th graders, and 1.5% of 12th graders had abused ketamine at least once in the year prior to their being surveyed.
      • At the age of 27 Mike Matt couldn’t take no more stress from the work and from his recent marriage. He was planning to run away from his stress to start a new life, but he thought about his new marriage so he decided not to. Instead he went to a bar, but not to drink ( because alcohol wasn’t relieving his stress no more) but to try meth. He seen other men try it there and they looked pretty relieved mike said. So he tried it and he liked it and kept doing it daily. Soon he got addicted and his friends grew concern, so mike went to a therapist to discuss his addiction, and his therapist told him to take time off from work and spend time with friends and family. Now Mike is on his way to recovery.
      Personal Drug Addiction Story
    • How Is It Harmful
      • Seizers
      • Addiction
      • Rape ( Rohypnol and GHB )
      • Brain damage
      • Blood pressure increases
      • Organ Failure ( Kidney, Heart )
      • No self-control
      • Blurred vision
      • Loss of muscle
    • How Many People Use It
      • The Federal Government's Household Survey on Drug Abuse, conducted annually, is the most commonly cited set of statistics on the prevalence of drug use. According to the latest surveys, cited by the DEA themselves, there are about 12.7 million people who have used some illegal drug in the last month and perhaps 30 to 40 million who have used some illegal drug within the last year. Of the 12.7 million who used illegal drugs in the last month, about 10 million are presumed to be casual drug users, and about 2.7 million are addicts.
    • Websites
      • http://www.answers.com/topic/club-drug
      • http://www.whitehousedrugpolicy.gov/streetterms/ByType.asp?intTypeID=53
      • www.drugabuse.gov/drugpages/clubdrugs.html
      • http://www.drugfree.org/LifeAfter/story/default.aspx?id=5223896b-3218-4d1b-aa45-b731f8c05fe8