Ncdpi personal financial literacy presentation spring 2011
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  • Why Essential Standards?The Essential Standards identify the most critical knowledge and skills that students need to learn-filtering the “must have” elements of the curriculum from the “nice to have” elements. ES indicate what students should know, understand and be able to do. In Social Studies, the use of big ideas/guiding concepts and a common taxonomy (RBT) has resulted in standards that are fewer in number, clearer in the expected student outcomes and higher in cognitive processes.
  • Shift to essential standards is a shift from teacher centered instructional tasks to a focus on the cognitive process of students--how students best think and learn. Because of this shift you should be able to see a structural difference On the next slide you will see an example of the current standards and then the change to the conceptual format.
  • Highlight subject verb and object or underline.How are the two statements structurally different? (One verb/higher order, broader/conceptual focus)Essential Standards—more flexible, gives teachers and districts more ownership in deciding what to teach within this framework; appeals to diversity of student interests.SS Instructional Toolkit—Will further clarify what students should know, understand and be able to do.
  • The five (5) strands are History, Economics, Culture, Geography and Civics and Government. If you go back and crosswalk these five with the 10 Thematic Strands you will see that we have not eliminated anything, just combined. You will see that K-12- all standards will be written to these 5 strands.  Our old standards have the thematic strands interwoven into the standards. The new Essential Standards are written to the particular Strand itself. Our research of state standards across the nation indicates that many Departments of Education have begun writing standards to these five (5) primary strands.
  • Conceptual knowledge transfers to the next level of learning.Timeless-transfers across eras, periods, decades, centuries and does not changeUniversal-transfers across any content area, any level of learning, any race, religion, gender, ethnic group, any place on earth. If it is a concept in the US then it is also a concept in Africa, the South Pacific, Outter space, etc. Abstract and Broad- It is never concrete or tangibleExamples Share Common Attributes- all the examples share identifying traits1-2 words- should never be long phrases or statementsAdditionally, the new structure of the 2010 K‐12 Social Studies Essential Standards reflects a shift to a more conceptual framework. The goal of conceptually written standards is to help students recognize patterns and make connections in their learning that transfer beyond a single discipline, topic, grade, or isolated fact. This adoption of a conceptual framework reduces the number of objectives while continuing to address similar topics, facts and skills. All concepts share the common characteristics listed here: Timeless, Universal, Abstract…By moving from a traditional topic-based/fact-based model to a more conceptually focused standards framework it does not mean that we won’t be teaching certain content, but rather we are doing it in a more focused way. Given the time constraints of the school year, we are not able to teach it all and students are not able to learn it all in one year or semester. However, by moving to a more conceptual framework, we are able to focus on the big ideas and lessons of social studies that we want students to transfer from one grade level to the next, K-12 and beyond. Why is the concept of “Revolution” timeless?What are the attributes of a revolution?You want to draw their attention to that fact that here we have characteristics that make a revolution a revolution. Each is timeless and universal. Revolutions:Goal is to affect changeRelatively shortReflect some type of discontentEmotional elementSome amount of change usually occurs.Additionally, conceptual standards will give teachers and districts more flexibility in the content examples that they may elect to use in order to support the big ideas rather than feeling as though they have to share every possible example with students.
  • Social Studies Concepts that are strand specific (Combines two organizational components—strands and concepts)Macro Concepts that can occur in all strands—Change & Continuity, Power, LibertyMicro Concepts that are strand specific—scarcity, supply & demand in EconomicsK-12 application of social studies concepts: Next slide
  • Let’s take a look at following the conceptual progression of a strand from elementary school to high school. Here we have chosen to show you an example from the Civics and Government strand. As you look at the slide you will notice two things. A numbering system which encompasses the social studies strands, that will be shared with you later. And…Very broad conceptually written statements. Remember, CONCEPTUAL standards are not filled with facts, events, people and places. They are broad general statements.
  • The crosswalk documents show a side-by-side comparison of the 2006 and the 2010 standards. This document is useful to identify content that has shifted grade levels or have been omitted. You may also use this document to determine implications for future professional development needs that your teachers may have as a result of changes in the standards.**Make sure to add that there will be a section in some grade levels for eliminated or moved content.We know that some of you have asked to work on the documents and we will be looking
  • The crosswalk documents show a side-by-side comparison of the 2006 and the 2010 standards. This document is useful to identify content that has shifted grade levels or have been omitted. You may also use this document to determine implications for future professional development needs that your teachers may have as a result of changes in the standards.Will want to note to the participants that they will see very little crosswalked for the PFL standard objectives and note why. See example!Why are the crosswalks important?
  • Unpacking documentHelps to clearly demonstrate what students should know, understand and be able to do to in order to truly master each clarifying objective and its corresponding essential standard.In the unpacking document, understandings are broad generalizations written at a conceptual level that measure …
  • Civics and Economics Essential Standards/Clarifying Objectives were partially developed around the National Standards in K-12 Personal Finance Education sponsored by the Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial LiteracyUse this slide to talk with the participants about the Jumpstart Standards. Have them take our and refer to the handout given to them in their packets.Jump$tart Coalition for Personal FinancialLiteracy consists of 180 organizations and 47affiliated state coalitions dedicated to improvingthe financial literacy of youth from kindergartenthrough college age by providing advocacy,research, standards, and educational resources.Jump$tart strives to prepare youth for lifelongsuccessful financial decision making.In 1998, the Jump$tart Coalition for PersonalFinancial Literacy issued its first Personal FinanceGuidelines and Benchmarks. A group of 20professionals representing a broad range ofeducation, government, and financial service organizationsdeveloped these original guidelines.In 2001, and again in 2006, the Jump$tartCoalition board authorized the formation ofa task force to revise and update the NationalStandards in K–12 Personal Finance Education.

Ncdpi personal financial literacy presentation spring 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Personal Financial Literacy in Civics and Economics
    K-12 Social Studies Section
    Curriculum and Instruction
    North Carolina Department of Public Instruction
    K-12 Social Studies Consultants
  • 2. Agenda
    Brief Overview Of The Social Studies Essential Standards And The Rationale For Including PFL Standards Into The Civics & Economics Course
    Organizational Structure Of The Social Studies Essential Standards
    Understanding PFL In The Civics & Economics Course
    Integrating PFL Into The Civics & Economics Course
  • 3. Brief Overview of the Social Studies Essential Standards
  • 4. North Carolina Social Studies Essential Standards Current Timeline
  • 5. PFL State Requirements in North Carolina
    2005 HB 16 / SB 912
    Authorization:HB 16: Passed House 5/10/05 and SB 912: Passed Senate 5/26/05. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts: SECTION 1.  G.S. 115C-81 is amended by Session Law 2005-276, Section 7.59 by adding a new subsection to read: "(i) Both the standard course of study and the Basic Education Program shall include the requirement that the public schools provide instruction in personal financial literacy for all students during the high school years.
    The State Board of Education shall determine the components of personal financial literacy that will be covered in the curriculum.
    The State Board shall also review the high school standard course of study to determine in which course the new personal financial literacy curriculum can be integrated.“
  • 6.
    • North Carolina legislation
    • 7. National Standards for K-12 Personal Finance Education (Jump$tart Coalition for Financial Literacy)
    • 8. National Social Studies Standards (National Council for the Social Studies)
    • 9. National Geography Standards (National Council for Geographic Education)
    • 10. National History Standards (National Center for History in the Schools)
    National Standards for Civics and Government (Center for Civic Education)
    • National Standards for Economic Education (Council for Economic Education)
  • The Intent of Essential Standards
    Focused on what students NEED TO KNOW, not what’s nice for them to know
    Delineates what students should know, understand and be able to do
    FEWER, CLEARER, HIGHER
  • 11. The Shift to Essential Standards
    • The Essential Standards & Clarifying Objectives focus on concepts and the COGNITIVE PROCESS.
  • Identify the differences
    5/5/2011 • page 9
    Q. How are the two statements structurally different?
    A. The new essential standard has only 1 verb, the focus is conceptual and not based on facts, gives the teacher more ownership and flexibility in deciding what to teach within this framework. It also takes into account the diversity of student interests.
  • 12. Organizational Structure of the Social Studies Essential Standards: Strands, Concepts and Taxonomy
  • 13. Essential Standards Social Studies Strands
    History
    Civics & Government
    Economics and Personal Financial Literacy
    Social Studies
    Geography and Environmental Literacy
    Culture
  • 14. The Conceptual Shift
    Conceptual Standards…are focused on “transferable ideas”
    • Timeless
    • 15. Universal
    • 16. Abstract & Broad
    • 17. Examples Share Common Attributes
    • 18. Represented by 1-2 words
    CE.PFL.2.3
    Summarize ways consumers can protect themselves from fraudulent and deceptive practices (e.g., do not call lists, reading the fine print, terms and conditions, personal information disclosure, investment protection laws, fees, etc.) .
    Transferable
  • 19. 13
  • 20. The Conceptual Progression of a Strand From Elementary to Middle to High
    4.E.2.1 Explain how personal financial decisions such as spending, saving and paying taxes can positively and/or negatively effect every day life.
    7.E.1.4 Explain how personal financial decision making impacts quality of life (e.g., credit, savings, investing, borrowing and giving).
    CE.PFL.1.1 Explain how education, income, career, and life choices impact an individual’s financial plan and goals (e.g., job, wage, salary, college/university, community college, military, workforce, skill development, social security, entrepreneur, rent, mortgage, etc.).
    CE.PFL.1.5 Analyze how fiscally responsible individuals save and invest to meetfinancial goals (e.g., investment, stock market, bonds, mutual funds, etc.).
  • 21. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy: NC’s New Lens
    Provides the framework used for all North Carolina Essential Standards
    Common language used for all curriculum areas
    Use of One Verb
    Social
    Studies
  • 22. Coding the Essential Standards
    Essential Standard Number
    Clarifying Objective Number
    Strand
    Course
    CE.PFL.2.1
    High school standards are coded by Course, Strand, Essential Standard Number and Clarifying Objective Number
  • 23. Understanding PFL in the C&E Course
  • 24. The Instructional Toolkit
    Priority 1 Tools:
    Crosswalks of 2006 & 2010 standards
    Unpacked content documents
    http://www.ncpublicschools.org/acre/standards/support-tools/
  • 25. Crosswalks
    Essential Standards
    Essential Standards
    Essential Standards
  • 26. Purpose of the Crosswalks
    The crosswalk documents:
    • Compare the 2010 K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards and the 2006 North Carolina Social Studies Standard Course of Study (SCOS).
    • 27. Provide insight into the similarities and differences between these two sets of standards, especially as it relates to content coverage and cognitive process.
    http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/acre/standards/support-tools/
  • 28. Crosswalk Example: Civics & Economics
  • 29. UNPACKING
    THE ESSENTIAL STANDARDS
    Essential
    Standards
    9-12
    K-2
    Electives
    3-5
    Essential Standards
    6-8
    Clarifying Objectives
  • 30. Purpose of Unpacking Documents
    The unpacking documents will demonstrate what students should:
    understand…(Conceptual)
    know…(Factual)
    be able to do…(Procedural)
    5/5/2011 • page 23
  • 31.
  • 32. 5/5/2011 • page 25
  • 33. Planning & Teaching Using the PFL Standards
  • 34. The PFL Connection
    27
  • 35. Personal financedescribes the principles and methods that individuals use to acquire and manage income and assets.
    Financial literacyis the ability to use knowledge and skills to manage one's financial resources effectively for lifetime financial security.
    The Personal Financial Literacy Standards were developed around the national Jump$tartstandards.
  • 36. PFL Best Practices in C&E
    29
    Use Jump$tart competencies to Plan
    • Financial Responsibility and Decision Making
    • 37. Income and Careers
    • 38. Planning and Money Management
    • 39. Credit and Debt
    • 40. Risk Management and Insurance
    • 41. Saving and Investing
    Integrate PFL strand throughout
    • When applicable combine PFL into the Civics & Government and/or Economics objectives
  • Planning with Jump$tart Competencies
    5/5/2011 • page 30
  • 42. Take A Moment To Test Your Skills At Identifying The Jump$tart Competencies That The Next 2 Objectives Address
    5/5/2011 • page 31
  • 43. 5/5/2011 • page 32
    CE.PFL.1.1 Explain how education, income, career, and life choices impact an individual’s financial plan and goals (e.g., job, wage, salary, college/university, community college, military, workforce, skill development, social security, entrepreneur, rent, mortgage, etc.).
  • 44. 5/5/2011 • page 33
    CE.PFL.1.1 Explain how education, income, career, and life choices impact an individual’s financial plan and goals (e.g., job, wage, salary, college/university, community college, military, workforce, skill development, social security, entrepreneur, rent, mortgage, etc.).
    Planning and Money Management
    Income and Careers
    Financial Responsibility and Decision Making
  • 45. 5/5/2011 • page 34
    CE.PFL.2.1 Explain how consumer protection laws and government regulation contribute to the empowerment of the individual (e.g., consumer credit laws, regulation, FTC-Federal Trade Commission, protection agencies, etc.).
  • 46. 5/5/2011 • page 35
    CE.PFL.2.1 Explain how consumer protection laws and government regulation contribute to the empowerment of the individual (e.g., consumer credit laws, regulation, FTC-Federal Trade Commission, protection agencies, etc.).
    Financial Responsibility and Decision Making
  • 47. Planning w/ the Jump$tart Competencies in Mind
    5/5/2011 • page 36
    Financial Responsibility and Decision Making
    • CE.PFL.1.1
    • 48. CE.PFL.2.1
    • 49. CE.PFL.2.2
    • 50. CE.PFL.2.5
    Credit and Debt
    • CE.PFL.1.2
    • 51. CE.PFL.1.4
    • 52. CE.PFL.2.5
    Income and Careers
    • CE.PFL.1.1
    • 53. CE.PFL.1.2
    Risk Management and Insurance
    • CE.PFL.2.3
    • 54. CE.PFL.2.4
    Planning and Money Management
    • CE.PFL.1.1
    • 55. CE.PFL.1.2
    • 56. CE.PFL.1.3
    • 57. CE.PFL.1.5
    Saving and Investing
    • CE.PFL.1.3
    • 58. CE.PFL.1.5
    • 59. CE.PFL.1.6
  • Integrating Objectives
    “Don’t teach PFL in isolation!”
    • When applicable teach the PFL objectives
    with the appropriate Civics & Government
    and/or Economics objectives.
  • 60. 5/5/2011 • page 38
    Integration Opportunity
    CE.PFL.1.2 Explain how fiscally responsible individuals create and manage a personal budget that is inclusive of income, taxes, gross and net pay, giving, fixed and variable expenses and retirement (e.g., budget, financial plan, money management, saving and investing plan, etc.).
    Reflect on what lesson topics or units could be taught to help integrate these objectives. Or think about how can these objectives be integrated into a unit?
    CE.C&G.2.2
    Summarize the functions of North Carolina state and local governments within the federal system of government (e.g., local charters, maintain a militia, pass ordinances and laws, collect taxes, supervise elections, maintain highways, types of local governments, etc.).
    CE.C&G.2.6
    Evaluate the authority federal, state and local governments have over individuals’ rights and privileges (e.g., Bill of Rights, Delegated Powers, Reserved Powers, Concurrent Powers, Pardons, Writ of habeas corpus, Judicial Process, states’ rights, Patriot Act, etc.).
  • 61. Social Studies
    Zoomerang Survey
    http://www.zoomerang.com/Survey/WEB22BX9XYFA54/
  • 62. Additional Resources
    Money Talks Workgroups
    http://moneytalks4teens.ucdavis.edu/
    Personal Financial Literacy Standards
    http://www.jumpstart.org/national-standards.html
    FTC - Credit Scoring Article
    http://www.bbb.org/us/article/ftc--credit-scoring-4637
    Investor Alert
    http://www.nasaa.org/investor_education/Investor_Alerts___Tips/
    PFL Lesson Plans
    http://www.kansascityfed.org/publicat/education/teachingresources/Lessonplangr9-12.pdf
    5/5/2011 • page 40
  • 63. 5/5/2011 • page 41
    Social Studies Consultants:
    Elementary
    Jolene Ethridge
    jethridge@dpi.state.nc.us
    Middle Grades
    Fay Gore
    fgore@dpi.state.nc.us
    Jennifer Ricks
    jricks@dpi.state.nc.us
    High School
    Dalton Edwards
    deedward@dpi.state.nc.us
    Michelle McLaughlin
    mmclaughlin@dpi.state.nc.us
    Lead Consultant
    Fay Gore
    fgore@dpi.state.nc.us
    Program Assistant
    Bernadette Cole