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  • Good Afternoon and welcome to the Elementary (K-5) Social Studies Session. Over the course of the two day’s, the social studies session will focus on assisting you with developing a deeper understanding of the Social Studies Essential Standards so that you may assist your district in developing your local curriculum. Whether you will be the person who helps develop the local curriculum or are here simply to take back information to the district, you may want to consider taking on two roles while you are here: (1) learner and (2) trainer. While you may be listening to gather information for your own professional development and understanding, your main role will be to gather information to inform your team about the development of the social studies curriculum in your district and/or school.Note: One of us should be responsible for keeping time in order to better inform the next training session. One can be monitoring the community, especially the parking lot Others making sure that everyone is in.Making sure we are monitoring the paper parking lot as well and capturing any questions that the participants ask that are not recorded in the room or in the community. We could possibly add to our FAQ sheet.
  • {Time: 1min.} Move this to the beginning of the presentationThe new Essential Standards for Information and Technology are based on the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy and are meant to be broad, rather than specific.  The new Essential Standards are a blend of the previously separate Computer/Technology Standard Course of Study and Information Skills Standard Course of Study.  The new ITES should be taught by classroom teachers, working in collaboration with Media Coordinators and Technology Facilitators, and embedded within the context of other curriculum.  The ITES should not be taught as if they were isolated skills. 
  • {Time: 1min.} Move this to the beginning of the presentationThe new Essential Standards for Information and Technology are based on the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy and are meant to be broad, rather than specific.  The new Essential Standards are a blend of the previously separate Computer/Technology Standard Course of Study and Information Skills Standard Course of Study.  The new ITES should be taught by classroom teachers, working in collaboration with Media Coordinators and Technology Facilitators, and embedded within the context of other curriculum.  The ITES should not be taught as if they were isolated skills. 
  • {Time: 2min.} Move this to the beginning of the presentationThe new Essential Standards for Information and Technology are based on the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy and are meant to be broad, rather than specific.  The new Essential Standards are a blend of the previously separate Computer/Technology Standard Course of Study and Information Skills Standard Course of Study.  The new ITES should be taught by classroom teachers, working in collaboration with Media Coordinators and Technology Facilitators, and embedded within the context of other curriculum.  The ITES should not be taught as if they were isolated skills. 
  • {Time: About 30 minutes} Move this to the beginning of the presentationNotes: You may want to use the Smart board to access the site as you discuss it. Once everyone has access, provide a brief tutorial, identifying what we have uploaded to the community. You should also mention that they may create their own community group for their school or district and show them where that option is located. Please mention that while we would love to have the entire state join our community group, it is limited to Summer Institute participants right now because we are trying to provide support for those district leaders responsible for developing the local social studies curriculum. It would be unmanageable for us right now to try to include any more than the district social studies leaders.One of the resources that we are providing for social studies leaders across the state is an online forum that you can use to stay connected with the DPI social studies team as well as collaborate with other social studies leaders across the State following the summer institute. We have created a special group for social studies leaders across the state, that you may use to pose questions regarding essential standards implementation to the members of the group. You may also use this as a tool to share resources and ideas about how your district is implementing the new standards. We will continue to upload DPI created resources that you may use and to make you aware of important events and information that regarding policy changes, legislation, resources, etc. We also invite you to use this as a space to collaborate on projects and documents to support the development of local social studies curriculaBefore you can begin using the site, you will have to register. Once you have completed the registration information, look for the NC Social Studies group and ask us for permission to join. One of our team members will give you access. Once you have access, please introduce yourself by responding to the blog entitled. “Introductions for Kinston Summer Institute.” We would also ask that you complete the Google Form located in the Resources page of the Documents Tab. For right now, this site will be limited to those who attend the summer institute. If you have not already done so, take a few moments to access the site using the link and register following the steps on the handout in your packet. If you need assistance please let us know. While in the community, please take a moment to read the user agreement.Additionally, throughout the session, you will be able to post any questions you have about the training to the parking lot.
  • {Time: About 30 minutes} Notes: You may want to use the Smart board to access the site as you discuss it. Once everyone has access, provide a brief tutorial, identifying what we have uploaded to the community. You should also mention that they may create their own community group for their school or district and show them where that option is located. Please mention that while we would love to have the entire state join our community group, it is limited to Summer Institute participants right now because we are trying to provide support for those district leaders responsible for developing the local social studies curriculum. It would be unmanageable for us right now to try to include any more than the district social studies leaders.One of the resources that we are providing for social studies leaders across the state is an online forum that you can use to stay connected with the DPI social studies team as well as collaborate with other social studies leaders across the State following the summer institute. We have created a special group for social studies leaders across the state, that you may use to pose questions regarding essential standards implementation to the members of the group. You may also use this as a tool to share resources and ideas about how your district is implementing the new standards. We will continue to upload DPI created resources that you may use and to make you aware of important events and information that regarding policy changes, legislation, resources, etc. We also invite you to use this as a space to collaborate on projects and documents to support the development of local social studies curriculaBefore you can begin using the site, you will have to register. Once you have completed the registration information, look for the NC Social Studies group and ask us for permission to join. One of our team members will give you access. Once you have access, please introduce yourself by responding to the blog entitled. “Introductions for Kinston Summer Institute.” We would also ask that you complete the Google Form located in the Resources page of the Documents Tab. For right now, this site will be limited to those who attend the summer institute. If you have not already done so, take a few moments to access the site using the link and register following the steps on the handout in your packet. If you need assistance please let us know. While in the community, please take a moment to read the user agreement.Additionally, throughout the session, you will be able to post any questions you have about the training to the parking lot.
  • {Time: 3 min.} The primary reasons Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) was selected as the taxonomy to use for the development of the NC Essential Standards is that, one, RBT provides a clear and concise framework for thinking about standards in terms of the cognitive processes students use to learn and the kind of knowledge students are expected to master. Secondly, the use of RBT provides a common language for teachers and curriculum designers from different curricular areas as they translate and discuss the Essential Standards, develop curriculum and plan lessons together. For example, analysis in social studies is the same as analysis in art, PE, Science, etc. Thus, when teachers are planning interdisciplinary units of instruction; they can easily understand how their subjects may overlap and how they may teach the same conceptual and procedural knowledge in multiple subject areas simultaneously.   Finally, the standards were written using only one verb per essential standard and clarifying objectives which helps to ensure the alignment of local curricula, instruction and assessment with state standards. So, as you begin to plan training for your district, you may consider purchasing this Book by Dr. Lorin Anderson et. al because it is useful as a “more authentic tool for curriculum planning, instructional delivery and assessment.” It is important to also note that a common taxonomy such as RBT was not used in the development of the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Any taxonomy system, whether Original Bloom’, Revised Blooms, or Marzo’s, is intended to be used as a classification system. In the case of original Bloom’s Taxonomy on the left, it is a multi-tiered model used to classify thinking according to the six cognitive levels of complexity shown here. Six levels have been depicted as being hierarchical in nature in that a student must master material at the knowledge level before they can move from the comprehension level to the application level, etc. And, the levels were divided into lower-level and higher level cognitive functions with knowledge, the bottom three levels being classified as lower level and the top three classified as higher level functions, leading teachers to challenge students to “climb to a higher level of thought.”  On the other hand, the revised taxonomy is not hierarchical in nature. Instead, the verbs are discussed in terms of cognitive complexity. Students do not have to master one level of cognitive processes before advancing to another. Instead, students may engage in a process that is more complex before they engage in one that is less complex.  Another important difference is that RBT is two dimensional in nature with the addition of the knowledge dimension.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 5 min.} Bloom's original cognitive taxonomy was a one-dimensional form that focused only on cognitive processes; however with further research, the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy takes the form of a two-dimensional table that you see here. One of the dimensions, The Cognitive Process Dimension, identifies the process used to learn while the second, The Knowledge Dimension, identifies the kind of knowledge to be learned. The Knowledge Dimension on the left side is composed of four levels that are defined as Factual, Conceptual, Procedural, and Meta-Cognitive. The Cognitive Process Dimension across the top of the grid consists of six levels that are defined as Remember, Understand, Apply, Analyze, Evaluate, and Create. The Cognitive Process Dimension levels are also subdivided so that there are only 25 total verbs that will be used in developing the Essential Standards and each verb has a very specific meaning. You will find a document in the community that defines both the types of knowledge as well as the verb. And the red dot on the chart represents the most common type of standard you will see in the new essentials and that is understand conceptual knowledge.So, when you return back to your district, you should poll your teaches to see how familiar they are with RBT and have discussions about implications for curriculum development, instructional design, and assessment.
  • {Time: 3 min.} Here you will see the five conceptual strands used in the development of the new Essential Standards.H–History, G–Geography and Environmental Literacy, E–Economics and Financial Literacy, C&G–Civics and Governance, and C–CultureThese conceptual strands represent the sub disciplines of social studies with the cultural strand and geography strand incorporating the behavioral sciences.What is important to note here as well is that Environmental Literacy is a strong focus K-12 as well as PFL to reflect the changing need of students in the 21st Century.Each ES is written to a particular identifying strand. In graded K-8, there is at least one essential standard written to each strand. For high school courses, you will see essential standards written to one or two strands, while the remaining strands are imbedded in the clarifying objectives.As you look at this structural change, you will see the yellow arrow marks where the strand is located (Geography and Environmental Literacy). The coding system has changed as changed as a result of this new structure In graded K-8, standards are coded as you see in the first example on the left. In red you will see the Elementary example which shows the Grade-Kindergarten, Strand is Economics, Essential Standard number is 1 and the Clarifying Objective number is 1. In the example on the right, you will see the High School example which is coded by course instead of grade level – CE standard for Civics and Economics). Then, the Strand is Civics and Government, the Essential Standard number is 2, and the Clarifying Objective number is 1.
  • {Time: 3 min.} However, in order to develop fewer standards, which was our charge from the State Board, we consolidated the 10 thematic strands to the five conceptual strands shown here. Research of state standards across the nation indicates that many Departments of Education have begun writing standards to these five (5) primary strands as well. The organization of the new essential standards also provides a framework by which to organize critical content, concepts, and generalizations that are essential for understanding the disciplines of social studies. Writing standards that are specifically targeted to each conceptual strand ensures that students will receive a greater understanding of each discipline of social studies as well as the relationship among the disciplines. While we have elected to use five strands, students will still be able to draw upon the themes of social studies such as time, continuity, change, power, authority, global connections etc. because these themes are also concepts. As we crosswalk (click on each of the national strands) these five with the 10 Thematic Strands you will see that we have not eliminated anything, just combined. Global connections are embedded in all the strands. 
  • Now we would like you to return to the Social Studies Community and complete the poll about these strands. You will be asked to select the discipline that receives the most instructional time and the discipline for which you think receives the least amount of instructional time. Once we share the results, engage in a discussion with your group to provide the reasons for the strand you selected and why reasons for the poll results. Then, we will share out as a whole groupDiscuss the results of the poll as a whole group. Make sure you mention that if we want to make sure that we are helping to build a strong foundation for students, then we must make sure we are confident in teaching the all of the strands and that all strands are included in curriculum planning. They may want to replicate this activity in the district and maybe tweak it to determine the area where teachers may need additional professional development.
  • {Time: 15 min. including viewing the clip and discussion}Link to clip - http://cooperativelearning.nuvvo.com/lesson/9592-seinfeld-teaches-history Before we discuss this change, let’s take a moment to view a history lesson that represents why we have made this change to a more conceptual framework. As you view the Saturday Night Live clip of Seinfeld’s History class, you may recognize some of these students from your own classrooms or schools. And, you may even recognize the teacher in your school or district. But, as you view the clip,think about what is missing from this classroom? Also think about why Seinfeld is having such a touch time helping students remember the facts and why the students are struggling to answer his questions? What overall impressions do you have about this teaching and learning environment? {Provide probing questions about the video that ties into the structure of knowledge and concept-based teaching prior to watching the video. We should project the questions on the screen. Discussion will follow the viewing.}Note:Make sure we have the link to the video some where. Gail will have on her computer as well as everyone else. You may want to capture the discussion using the Smart board.Other uses of the clip: http://www.peterpappas.com/2011/02/jerry-seinfeld-history-teacher-observations-saturday-night-live-snl-classroom.html
  • {Time: 1 min.}So, how do we know if a concept is a concept or a topic? Concepts share the following characteristics…
  • {Time: 5 min. including time to think}Maybe we can have the IHE group to just jot the activity choices down on the back of their agenda or presentation papers.Let’s assess your ability to distinguish between a concept and a topic. Take a few moments and decide which you think are concepts and which you think are topics. You may do this individually or with your table/pod partners. Think about the characteristics of a concept that we just discussed. These characteristics are also in your packet.
  • {Time: 1 min.}Now that you have a better understanding of the structure of knowledge and the importance developing conceptual understanding we will explore the implications this has for understanding the new Essential Standards. Let’s start by looking at the familiar. Traditional Standards and curriculum are topic-based and are written to focus primarily on specific facts. For example, in the 2006 standards, we identified specific content topics such as what you see here and teachers taught specific facts to support the topics.
  • {Time: 1 min.}Conversely, conceptually-written standards and curriculum are broadly stated and focus on concepts and transferable ideas. While we will still teach topic and facts in the new essential standards, we will move beyond the topics and facts to focus on conceptual ideas such as leadership, environmental challenges, justice, etc.
  • {Time: 1 min.}The goal of conceptually written standards is to help students recognize patterns and make connections in their learning that transfer beyond a single discipline, topic, grade, or isolated fact. In understanding this conceptual framework, we must first understand how knowledge is structured.Every discipline has a body of knowledge for which students are expected to master. This body of knowledge has an inherent structure that is the progression from the acquisition of factual knowledge around specific topics to more abstract understandings of concepts, principles, and generalizations. Understanding this structure will help curriculum developers and teachers design curriculum and instruction for deeper understanding for students.
  • Talking points to consider:At the base of the structure is factual knowledge (remember RBT). In social studies, factual knowledge consists of topics organized around a set of facts related to specific people, places, situations, or things. For example, Seinfeld was expecting his students to regurgitate some facts about World War II. Most teachers are comfortable in this realm because they are the experts on factual knowledge for their particular discipline. Factual knowledge is very important because facts provide support for the topic under study. However, teaching the facts alone is not sufficient because the goal of concept-based curriculum and instruction is to move students beyond the facts and make connections and see patterns in their learning. Factual knowledge applies only to a particular time, place, or situation and do not transfer beyond that particular topic under study.
  • Talking points to consider:Because factual knowledge alone does not help students to think more deeply about a subject under study, we need to help students scaffold their thinking to a higher level of abstraction (remember conceptual knowledge from RBT). This higher level of abstraction is where concepts and generalizations lie. Concepts are organizing ideas or mental constructs that help the brain connect the facts and topics. Generalizations are statements of understanding that are formed by seeing the relationship between or among various concepts. Principles are the foundational truths of a discipline. They are the big ideas or the lessons of social studies that you want students to understand and transfer beyond that single lesson, grade level or course.Organizing the curriculum around conceptual knowledge creates a mental schema for students to form patterns of new information. Concepts, generalizations, and principles are great organizers for curriculum because you can draw examples out of any culture. When we revise our standards and/or our curriculum in the future, we won’t have to change the whole structure because concepts never change nor do the big ideas change very often. Unlike topics and facts, conceptual understanding does transfer beyond a particular time, place, or situation.
  • Talking points to consider:Once students begin to form mental schema around concepts, principles, and generalizations, they will begin to understand the big ideas/generalizations or principles of the discipline. For example: Seinfeld may have wanted students to understand that: {see generalizations on the slide}. One thing to note: generalizations must be developmentally appropriate for the learner. While the generalizations appear to be written for upper elementary to high school level, you may have to adjust the generalization to match the grade level or cognitive ability of the learner. For example, even a kindergarten student can understand that: A nation may go to war to protect its people.Connection to Seinfeld clip: Seinfeld’s history lesson was missing the conceptual understanding students needed to connect the factual knowledge with the conceptual ideas. Seinfeld could have begun one of his lessons by asking students to think about war in a broader context. He could have posed the following questions: What happens when different nations go to war? What impact does war have on culture, on the physical landscape of a place, on the economy, or on governmental relations? And, why do groups go to war? By focusing on conceptual understanding in a broader context, as students begin to study any war, during any time period, or in any place, they may think about these questions and begin to see the relationship, for instance, between war and change, war and the economy, war and politics, etc.Note:This may be a major paradigm shift for some teachers. While concept-based curriculum and instruction is not new; it may take additional training and practice to consciously plan and to consistently help students make connections in their learning. The social studies team is preparing additional training for teachers and districts who may need additional support.
  • Talking Point:Take a look at the two examples and discuss your observations about the two topics and their structure of knowledge.A understanding of this structure will help you understand the shift in the type of standard we have created, but also the type of resources that are needed to support these standards. Traditionally, teachers are content experts and know the facts and topics for which they teach. We have to get teachers and students to think beyond the facts. For example…While the topics and facts may change, the concepts and generalizations may remain the same. Students will have developed a mental scaffolding for studying migration, opportunity, needs, and freedom so that when they encounter these conceptual ideas again, they will be able to transfer that understanding to different situations, times, and place. This helps students get to deeper understanding which show the concepts used in different ways.
  • {Time: 2-5 min.}On-Line Community ReflectionDiscussion question in the forum.Once you go back in to the Community this evening you will need to go in to GROUPS and find NC Social Studies and then click on to the tab marked DISCUSSION. Once there you will see this question. “How do you think the structural changes in Social Studies will affect your school district?”
  • The crosswalk documents show a side-by-side comparison of the 2006 and the 2010 standards and provides some insight into the similarities and differences between these two sets of standards, especially as it relates to content coverage. This document is useful to identify content that has been added, omitted or moved from one grade level to another. The crosswalk documents are intended to help teachers understand what the specific content of an old objective may be addressing and if that objective aligns in someway to the understandings, knowledge and skills of the clarifying objectives of the new Essential Standards.The crosswalks also help teachers to be able to clearly identify any gaps that may exist due to the addition of new content or because content has been removed from one grade or course and placed into different one. In this case the crosswalks help teachers and teacher leaders identify and plan for professional development that may be needed as well as resources. Additionally, the crosswalks help determine if and how existing resources may be repurposed.
  • Talking points to consider:Participants are asked to notice the strand on the left hand side in the margin as well as the new coding format. Participants will be able to not that the format used to develop the crosswalk documents expands upon the row and column format used to present the new essential standards. In the first column, participants will see the Essential Standard and Clarifying Objectives. In the middle column, they will see the objectives from the 2006 Standard Course of Study (SCOS) that align with the new Clarifying Objectives. A final component to remember about the format used to present thecrosswalked material is that there are some grades or courses that have a section that appears at the end of the completed crosswalk documenting content that has been eliminated or moved to a different grade level.Talking points to consider when using the particular example on this slide:Using an example from the new second grade Essential Standards, participantswill see that there are multiple objectives from the 2006 SCOS align to the new clarifying objectives. It is important to note that clarifyingobjectivesmay be connected by broad conceptual understandings and thus should not be seen in the same light as they were in the old standards. It is important that teachers using the crosswalks ask the question, “What is different about the new standard?”Participants looking at the crosswalk example on this slide will notice that Clarifying Objective 2.G.1.1 crosses with the 2006 objectives for second grade that teach the interpretation skills involved in using maps. Participants will also notice that Clarifying Objective 2.G.1.2 crosses content with the 2006 objectives for second grade that teach about location and physical features as well as the building of skills that call for using geographic tools. This means that Clarifying Objective 2.G.1.2 has content that is parallel or similar to that found in some of its 2006 objectives.
  • (1 min)
  • {Time: 1min.} Move this to the beginning of the presentationThe new Essential Standards for Information and Technology are based on the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy and are meant to be broad, rather than specific.  The new Essential Standards are a blend of the previously separate Computer/Technology Standard Course of Study and Information Skills Standard Course of Study.  The new ITES should be taught by classroom teachers, working in collaboration with Media Coordinators and Technology Facilitators, and embedded within the context of other curriculum.  The ITES should not be taught as if they were isolated skills. 
  • Is this activity necessary? If so, perhaps consider using this when after you talk about the crosswalk documents for CC Literacy Standards with new ESs.
  • {Time: 4 min.} Now we would like you to return to the Social Studies Community and complete the poll about these strands. You will be asked to select the discipline that receives the most instructional time and the discipline for which you think receives the least amount of instructional time. Once we share the results, engage in a discussion with your group to provide the reasons for the strand you selected and why reasons for the poll results. Then, we will share out as a whole groupDiscuss the results of the poll as a whole group. Make sure you mention that if we want to make sure that we are helping to build a strong foundation for students, then we must make sure we are confident in teaching the all of the strands and that all strands are included in curriculum planning. They may want to replicate this activity in the district and maybe tweak it to determine the area where teachers may need additional professional development.
  • The second priority one tool that has been developed by NCDPI is the unpacking document.The unpacking document breaks down in more detail what students should understand, know and be able to do in order to master each clarifying objective of an essential standard.The unpacking document addresses three knowledge dimensions—conceptual knowledge, factual knowledge and procedural knowledge. There are two types of objectives that have been unpacked—content standards which have been unpacked to reflect conceptual and factual knowledge, and skill standards which have been unpacked to specifically demonstrate student procedural knowledge. Conceptual Knowledge: A Student Must Understand…The K-12 Essential Standards have been conceptually structured to ensure the transfer of knowledge from one grade level to the next and across disciplines. Because of this structural shift, specific concepts and generalizations have been unpacked from each clarifying objective that identify what students should understand in order to master that particular objective.Factual Knowledge: A Student Must KnowCritical content, such as topics and facts, have been unpacked from each clarifying objective to identify what students should know in order to master that specific objective. Therefore, unpacked critical content is not intended to be a laundry list of facts but a representation of the most critical factual information that a student should know for mastery of an objective. Procedural Knowledge: A Student Must Be Able To DoSkills have been integrated throughout the K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards. Where appropriate, these skills have been unpacked to demonstrate specific procedural knowledge, or specifically what students should be able to do, in order to master a specific clarifying objective.
  • These eighth grade content objectives in the history strand have been unpacked to specifically address conceptual knowledge-what students should understand- in order to master this particular objective. In addition, this unpacking document reflects factual knowledge-what students should know –in order to master this particular objective in eighth grade.
  • This high school world history skill objective in the history strand has been unpacked to specifically address procedural knowledge-what students should be able to do-in order to master this particular objective. In addition, this unpacking document reflects factual knowledge-what students should know –in order to master this particular objective.
  • Deconstructing or unpacking the new standards helps educators identify specifically what students should understand, know and be able to do for each clarifying objective. The first step in unpacking or deconstructing the new essential standards is to identify each of the concepts that are either directly stated in the clarifying objective, or inferred within the context of the objective. Note: The concepts in objective 3.G.1.5, have been highlighted in blue to demonstrate this step. Once these concepts have been identified, the next step in unpacking the objective would be to think about the relationship between and among these particular concepts and express that relationship in a generalization. Note: One such relationship between concepts is demonstrated within the following generalization : “The physical and human geography of a place contributes to the identity of a region, community, state, nation or the world.”This generalization represents conceptual knowledge what students should understand in order to master this particular objective.
  • Possible Activity:The process of unpacking or deconstructing the essential standards can be an essential component of curriculum development. This activity using clarifying objective 4.H.1.3 is designed to initiate that process. The unpacking process can begin with identifying all of the concepts that are directly stated or inferred within the context of the clarifying objective. The relationships of these concepts can then be expressed within a generalized statement or understanding.
  • Are you asking the participants to write generalizations? Are these the “groups” for which you are referring? Then, will they respond to this questions?
  • Whether you are developing curriculum using an intradisciplinary or interdisciplinary approach, it is very important that you incorporate the five strands of social studies, as appropriate, into each unit. Teachers should remember that the new social studies essential standards are framed around five conceptual strands and that these five conceptual strands serve as a way to organize information that is to be taught in a particular grade or course. Although organized independently, these strands can, by no means, be taught in isolation. For example:To understand culture for example, students need to also understand continuity and change occurring over time (history). When teaching about power and authority one may also need to teach about different cultures, the relationships between people, places and environments as well as the interconnections among individuals, groups and institutions.The integration of thinking around concepts thrives on connections. A fully integrated curriculum combines different disciplines in a synergistic manner that makes the knowledge of one subject or discipline inseparable from that of another subject or discipline, with division occurring only in the teaching of sophisticated content or vocabulary.
  • Make sure to indicate that these are just a few of the steps. You may want to refer to the concept-based book at some point. Maybe, add an image. And, you can also indicate that chapter 4 of the book is a good start.Developing local curricula is a process. If you elect to organize standards as units of instruction this will become your local curriculum and will take time to develop. Here are some suggested steps to help get you started in the process. These steps are based on the work of Dr. H. Lynn Erickson in her book, Concept-Based Curriculum and Instruction for the Thinking Classroom and are the steps that connect to the unpacking document that was development by NCDPI. Important note: These are not all the steps that will get you to the development of a complete unit. The K-12 Social Studies Section at DPI will provide additional training and support during subsequent social studies leadership sessions.
  • The first step is to begin with the NC Standard Course of Study. You should become very familiar with the Essential Standards for the grade level or course for which you have to develop local curriculum i.e. N.C. History, World History, or Seventh Grade Social Studies.
  • You may have already completed this step when you began to unpack the standards. This part of the process will allow teachers to have a deeper understanding of the standards and will be useful throughout the unit development process. Notice the connects to Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT).
  • Question: How many of you have your students to develop units?What is your definition of a unit?Brainstorming mechanism that helps connect to what you want and need to teach and focus on when you actually start the teaching of a course.This is really not condusive to doing and creating while you teach. The number of units is just a suggestion. Not a research based proactice. Once teachers and other curriculum designers have a firm understanding of the Essential Standards, the next step is to create a yearly or semester plan for your grade level or course. One way to begin brainstorming what those units will be is by thinking of the units you have already identified support the new Essential Standards based on the Crosswalk documents. Then, think of additional units you may need.
  • How do you determine that each standard has been coherently included in the units of instruction.How do you direct your students in their planning?Possible Activity:You may use this template or create your own. Ask teacher to brainstorm topics that they would teach.Which ones would you feel are the most essential for students to learn to prepare them for the next grade level/course/for life? Then come to a consensus. Once a consensus is reached, They should identify the clarifying objectives that support each unit as well as the major concepts from the standards.
  • Once you have outlined the units for the year or semester, begin the integration of concepts and topics by identifying which strands of social studies are integrated as well as other subject areas that will be included in the unit of study.Another mechanism to brainstorm.This is a really good way to help teachers make connections to each of the strands and to make generalizations.Every strand will not always be represented nor will you always have connections to each discipline and content area.
  • The next step is to write generalizations that show the relationship among the concepts identified on the web. These are the big ideas for that grade level or course in social studies.

Transcript

  • 1. K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards Update
    NCPDI & IHE
    Partnership In Public Education
  • 2. 10/7/11 • page 2
    NCDPI K-12 Social Studies Team:
    Interim Section Chief
    Fay Gore
    fay.gore@dpi.nc.gov
    Program Assistant
    Bernadette Cole
    Bernadette.cole@dpi.nc.gov
    Elementary Consultant
    Jolene Ethridge
    Jolene.ethridge@dpi.nc.gov
    Middle Grades Consultant
    Fay Gore
    Fay.gore@dpi.nc.gov
    High School Consultant
    Michelle Mclaughlin
    Michelle.mclaughlin@dpi.nc.gov
  • 3. 3
    This presentation will consist of:
    NC Legislation impacting the development of the standards for social studies and recent updates.
    The content changesthat are a part of the new Social Studies Essential Standards and their implications. for
    Social Studies.
    A summary of what is different about the organizational structure of the K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards:
    • Use of Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
    • 4. Use of Strands
    • 5. Conceptual focus
    Connections to the new Information and Technology standards.
    The K-12 Social Studies Crosswalk documents.
    • The K-12 Social Studies Unpacking documents.
    • 6. The plans the social studies team has for developing the K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards into Units of Instruction.
  • Connections To The North Carolina Information and Technology Standards
    10/7/11 • page 4
    The Information and Technology Essential Standards go into effect July 2011.
    (Yes, This Year!)
  • 7. Connections To The North Carolina Information and Technology Standards
    10/7/11 • page 5
    Sources of Information
    Classify useful sources of information.
    Informational Text
    Understand the difference between text read for enjoyment and text read for information.
    Technology as a Tool
    Use technology tools and skills to reinforce classroom concepts and activities.
    Research Process
    Understand the importance of good questions in conducting research.
    Safety and Ethical Issues
    Remember safety and ethical issues related to the responsible use of information and technology resources.
  • 8. Connections To The North Carolina Information and Technology Standards
    10/7/11 • page 6
    TECHNOLOGY AS A TOOL
    Use technology and other resources for assigned tasks.
    Use appropriate technology tools and other resources to access information (multi-database search engines, online primary resources, virtual interviews with content experts).
    Use appropriate technology tools and other resources to organize information (e.g. online note-taking tools, collaborative wikis).
    • http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/acre/standards/new-standards/info-technology/grade6.pdf
    • 9. http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/acre/standards/new-standards/info-technology/grades9-12.pdf
  • Technology As A Tool: Using Technology For Assigned Tasks
    One of the technology tools we are using today =
    10/7/11 • page 7
    For example:
    http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/todaysMeet/index.html
  • 10. Use live stream to make comments and ask questions in real time.
    10/7/11 • page 8
    Access the Today’s Meet site at http://todaysmeet.com/SSIHESessionMeredithCollege
  • 11. Legislation Impacting K-12 Social Studies
    10/7/11 • page 9
    Session Law 2009-504: An Act Requiring “Credit Education” For All Students.
    http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Sessions/2009/Bills/House/PDF/H1474v5.pdf
    Public schools shall provide instruction in personal financial literacy for all students.
    This instruction shall include:
    • The true cost of credit
    • 12. Choosing and managing a credit card
    • 13. Borrowing money for an automobile or other large purchase
    • 14. Home mortgages
    • 15. Credit scoring and credit reports
    • 16. Other relevant financial literacy issues
    The State Board requires that personal financial literacy be included in the Civics and Economics Course. The new Civics and Economics Essential Standards include standards for Personal Financial Literacy.
    NCDPI Personal Financial Literacy site: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/pfl/educators/
    Session Law 2009-236 House Bill 1032: Act Modifying The History And Geography Curricula In ThePublic Schools.
    http://www.ncga.state.nc.us/Sessions/2009/Bills/House/PDF/H1032v6.pdf
    The standard course of study shall include the requirement that the public schools provide to all students one yearlong course of instruction on North Carolina history and geography in elementary school and one yearlong course of instruction in middle school on North Carolina history with United States history integrated into this instruction.
    Session Law 2001‐363 House Bill 195: N.C. History Taught/Student Citizen Act of 2001
    http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2001/Bills/House/PDF/H195v7.pdf
    Requires the public schools to provide courses of instruction on North Carolina History and Geography to students in elementary school and to students in middle school. The new Essentials include a fourth grade study of North Carolina History and an eighth grade parallel study of North Carolina and United States History.
    Enacts the Student Citizen Act of 2001
    . High school instruction in civic and citizenship education
    . Middle school instruction in civic and citizenship education with specific minimum expectations
    Instructs each local board of education to develop and implement character education instruction with input from the local community. Includes specific requirements. NCDPI Character Education website: http://www.ncpublicschools.org/charactereducation/
  • 17. Legislation Impacting K-12 Social Studies
    10/7/11 • page 10
    Session Law 2011-273 House Bill 588: The Founding Principles Act
    http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2011/Bills/House/PDF/H588v6.pdf
    Requires students to take a semester/year-long course called the American History I – The Founding Principles and receive a passing grade as a requirement for graduation. The United States History I course meets the requirements of the legislation. Consequently, the US History I course has been renamed to American History I: The Founding Principles.
     
    Session Law 2011-8 House Bill 48: No Standardized Testing Unless Req’d by Feds.
    http://www.ncleg.net/Sessions/2011/Bills/House/PDF/H48v4.pdf
    Eliminated statewide standardized testing in the public schools, except as required by federal law or as a condition of a federal grant.This effectively eliminated both the Civics and Economics and the United States History End-of-Course tests beginning with the 2011-12 school year.
  • 18. Research Used In Developing The K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards
    National Council for the Social Studies report on the middle grades
    National CurriculumStandardsforSocial Studies
    National Geography Standards
    National History Standards
    National Civics Standards
    Partnership for 21st Century (P21) Civic
    Partnership for 21st Century (P21) Geography
    National Standards for Financial Education
    National Standards for Economic Education
    National Association for the Education of Young Children  “Responding to Linguistic and Cultural Diversity”
    National Center for History In the Schools
    The State of World History Standards - Fordham Institute
    Partnership for 21st Century Skills
    Middle Grades Concepts – National Middle School Association
    Guidelines for Global and International Studies Education: Challenges, Culture, Connection
    Research on globalization
  • 19. 10/7/11 • page 12
    2009 General Assembly House Bill 1032
    Requires one yearlong course of instruction on N.C. History and geography in the elementary grades.
    Pre-colonial through Reconstruction
    Geography and Environmental Literacy
    Partnership for 21st Century Skills and Geography supports a strong focus on geography and geography skills in elementary grades.
    Pre-colonial through Reconstruction
    Canada and Mexico have been removed to provide a more in depth study of the United States
    6th grade is the first time that students are introduced to the world
    Shift from a study of just Europe and South America to an integrated study of the Ancient World through Exploration
    Should be taught from a comparative perspective and case study approach.
    2009 General Assembly House Bill 1032
    Parallel study of North Carolina & the United States
    Revolutionary era to contemporary times
    Integration of Personal Financial Literacy
    Addresses six periods that reflect accepted periodization by the World History Association
    Key focus of study is from mid 15th century to present.
    • Turning Points in American History
    • 20. 21st Century Geography
    • 21. Sociology
    • 22. Psychology
    • 23. American Humanities
    • 24. World Humanities
    • 25. The Cold War
    • 26. Twentieth Century Civil Liberties & Civil Rights
  • The Building Blocks Of
    The Social Studies Essential Standards
    CONCEPTS & GENERALIZATIONS
    A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK
    REVISED BLOOM’S
    STRANDS
    Research and Legislation
  • 27. Use of Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy (RBT) in the development of the North Carolina Social Studies Essential Standards
  • 28. 10/7/11 • page 15
    What keypointsdo you usuallydiscuss with your students about theimportance ofhaving an educational taxonomy?
  • 29. Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy
    Provides the cognitive framework used for all of the North Carolina Essential Standards
    Provides common language for all curriculum areas
    Use of one verb
  • 30.
  • 31. 18
  • 32. 19
    Compare the human and physical characteristics of places.
  • 33. 20
    Evaluate the effectiveness of cooperative efforts and consensus building among nations, regions, and groups (e.g. Humanitarian efforts, United Nations, World Health Organization, Non Governmental Organizations, European Union and Organization of American States).
  • 34. 21
    Analyze colonization in terms of the desire for access to resources and markets as well as the consequences on indigenous cultures, population, and environment (e.g., commercial revolution, Columbian exchange, religious conversion, spread of Christianity, spread of disease, spread of technology, conquistadors, slave trade, encomienda system, enslavement of indigenous people, mixing of populations, etc.).
  • 35. 22
    Construct maps, charts, and graphs to explain data about geographic phenomena (e.g. migration patterns and population and resource distribution patterns).
  • 36. 23
    Use maps, charts, graphs, geographic data and available technology tools (i.e. GPS and GIS software) to interpret and draw conclusions about social, economic, and environmental issues in modern societies and regions.
  • 37. Purpose of Strands in the North Carolina Social Studies Essential Standards
  • 38. Structural Changes
    H–History, G–Geography and Environmental Literacy, E–Economics and Financial Literacy, C&G–Civics and Government, and C–Culture
    S t r a n d
  • 39. National Thematic Strands
    http://www.socialstudies.org/standards
  • 40. 10/7/11 • page 27
    The Five Conceptual Strands
    Global Connections
    Time, Continuity & Change
    Individuals,
    Groups & Institutions
    Individuals,
    Groups & Institutions
    Science, Technology & Society
    People, Places & Environments
    Global Connections
    Global Connections
    Civic Ideals & Practices
    Culture
    Power, Authority & Governance
    Individual Development & Identity
    Global Connections
    Production, Distribution & Consumption
    Global Connections
  • 41. Integration Of Thinking
    10/7/11 • page 28
    http://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=0e9011bef5ce
  • 42. Table Talk: Talk at your table or in your group about the following questions:
    • Which strand(s) tends to get…
    • 43. The most attention in education/
    methods classes??? Why?
    • The least amount of attention in
    education/methods classes??? Why?
    • How do typical education/methods classes incorporate the teaching of the social studies thematic strands?
    10/7/11 • page 29
    The Strands Reflection
  • 44. Conceptual Focus of the North Carolina Social Studies Essential Standards
  • 45. 10/7/11 • page 31
    History Lesson
    Think about this:
    What strategies did Seinfeld use to promote student understanding?
    What could Seinfeld have done to better promoting student thinking and understanding?
    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1Bp0RvmEZno_BHCz6GOFWpIgFF4Y05O9Mf84lWwRn708/edit?hl=en_US
    http://www.yourememberthat.com/player/player.swf?url=http://www.yourememberthat.com/files/c01877150ce537c9.flv&autoplay=1&watermark=http://www.yourememberthat.com/flv_watermark.php&buffer=6&full=1&siteurl=http://www.yourememberthat.com&interval=16&totalrotatmmae=5
  • 46. 10/7/11 • page 32
    The Paradigm Shift: Conceptual Focus
    From Teaching
    &
    Learning Topically
    To Teaching
    &
    Learning Conceptually
    http://www.supermanhomepage.com/multimedia/Wallpaper-Images2/phonebooth.jpg
  • 47. Concepts Are…
    Timeless
    Universal
    Abstract and broad (to various degrees)
    Examples share common attributes
    Represented by 1-2 words
    Transferable
    10/7/11 • page 33
  • 48. 10/7/11 • page 34
  • 49. 10/7/11 • page 35
    Environment
    Manifest Destiny
    Computer Age
    Great Depression
    Culture
    Supply and Demand
    Movement
    System
    Civil War
    Concept vs. Topic?
  • 50. 10/7/11 • page 36
    Traditional Standards and Curriculum…
    have beentopic-based and focused mostlyon the facts
    History: Colonial Era, Lost Colony American Revolution,American Civil War
    Cultural Geography: South America and Europe, Swahili, Aborigines, Buddhism
    Civics & Economics: American Revolution, U.S. capitalism, Brown vs. Board of Education, mercantilism
  • 51. 10/7/11 • page 37
    Conceptual Standards and Curriculum… are concept-based andfocusedon “transferableideas”
    History: continuity and change, leadership, revolution, war, conflict
    Cultural Geography: climate change, location, resources, environmental challenges, human migration, cultural development
    Civics & Economics: scarcity, justice, freedom, authority, trade
  • 52. 10/7/11 • page 38
    The Structure Of Knowledge
    PRINCIPLES &
    GENERALIZATIONS
    CONCEPT
    CONCEPT
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
  • 53. 10/7/11 • page 39
    The Structure Of Knowledge
  • 54. 10/7/11 • page 40
    The Structure Of Knowledge
  • 55. 10/7/11 • page 41
    The Structure Of Knowledge
  • 56. 10/7/11 • page 42
    Example A
    Example B
  • 57. 10/7/11 • page 43
    What do you see as some benefits of the K-12 Social Studies Essential Standards?
    What are some possible challenges that you may encounter as you prepare teacher education students for the classroom?
  • 58. 10/7/11 • page 44
  • 59. The Instructional Toolkit
    Priority One Tools:
    • Crosswalks of 2006 & 2010 Standards
    • 60. Unpacked Content Documents
  • Intended Use of Crosswalks
    10/7/11 • page 46
    • To identify gaps in content (where something new may exist)
    • 61. To identify existing resources that can be repurposed
    • 62. To identify professional development needs based on new content areas
  • This Crosswalk …
    • …can show you the
    cross of the old cognitive
    process with the new
    • …can help you see type of
    knowledge
    • …can show you how even
    if the content is the same
    or similar that there are
    differences is in what the
    student is being asked to
    do with the content
    • …can help you see the
    gaps that may exist where
    content is moved from one
    grade to another
    • …can help you see if you
    have resources to support
    the new
    • …can help you see where
    teachers may need more
    PD or PD they have never
    had before
  • 63. This Crosswalk …
    • …can show you the
    cross of the old cognitive
    process with the new
    • …can help you see type of
    knowledge
    • …can show you how even
    if the content is the same
    or similar that there are
    differences is in what the
    student is being asked to
    do with the content
    • …can help you see the
    gaps that may exist where
    content is moved from one
    grade to another
    • …can help you see if you
    have resources to support
    the new
    • …can help you see where
    teachers may need more
    PD or PD they have never
    had before
  • 64. Example of Crossing the ELA CC with the SS Essential Srtandards
    10/7/11 • page 49
    DRAFT WORK
  • 65. 10/7/11 • page 50
    Working To Connect The Essential Standards To The North Carolina Information and Technology Standards
    Sources of Information
    Classify useful sources of information.
    Informational Text
    Understand the difference between text read for enjoyment and text read for information.
    Technology as a Tool
    Use technology tools and skills to reinforce classroom concepts and activities.
    Research Process
    Understand the importance of good questions in conducting research.
    Safety and Ethical Issues
    Remember safety and ethical issues related to the responsible use of information and technology resources.
  • 66. 10/7/11 • page 51
    Working To Connect The Essential Standards To The North Carolina Information and Technology Standards
  • 67. Table Connections: Work with your partner(s) or group to align a set of Information and Technology objectives to clarifying objectives from a social studies grade or course.
    10/7/11 • page 52
    Connecting The Essential Standards To The North Carolina Information &Technology Standards
  • 68. Unpacking the Essential Standards:
    The unpacking document…
    • Identifies what a student must understand
    (Conceptual Knowledge)
    Concepts and Generalizations
    • Identifies what a student must know
    (Factual Knowledge)
    Critical Content
    • Identifies what a student must be able to do
    (Procedural Knowledge)
    Skills
  • 69. 10/7/11 • page 54
  • 70. 10/7/11 • page 55
  • 71. 10/7/11 • page 56
    Checking Out An Example
    Clarifying Objective:
    3.G.1.5Summarize the elements (cultural, demographic,economic and geographic) that define regions, community, state, nation and world.
    A question you may want to ask as you unpack/deconstruct an objective is…
    “What are some possible concepts that can be inferred from thisobjective,
    in addition to those that are stated?”
    Diversity, Industry, Economy, Resources, Etc.
    The Essential Understanding/Generalization/Big Idea:
    The student will understand that:
    The physical and human geography of a place
    contributes to the identity of a region, community,
    state, nation or the world.
  • 72. 57
    Activity: From Concepts to Generalizations
    PRINCIPLES &
    GENERALIZATIONS
    4.H.1.3
    Explain how people, events, and developments brought about changes to communities in various regions in North Carolina.
    What are the concepts that you would teach from this standard? From the concepts, write a generalization or essential understanding.
    CONCEPT
    CONCEPT
    TOPIC
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
    F
    A
    C
    T
  • 73. A Look At How Each Group Has Unpacked The Same Standard
    10/7/11 • page 58
    Question to consider:What observations can you make as you see how different groups have unpacked the same objective?
  • 74. Social Studies Essential Standards:Unit Development
  • 75. Unit Development with an Integrated, Intra-/Interdisciplinary Approach
    10/7/11 • page 60
    K-12 SOCIAL STUDIES CURRICULUM
    Arts Education
    English/
    Language Arts
    English Language Development
    Healthful Living
    Information & Technology Skills
    Mathematics
    Science
    World Languages
    http://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=0e9011bef5ce
  • 76. 10/7/11 • page 61
    Organizing Standards AsUnits Of Instruction
    It’s A Process!
    Step 1: Start with the Essential Standards.
    Step 2: Deconstruct the Essential Standards and the Clarifying Objectives. (Unpacking Documents)
    Step 3: Create an outline of units you may teach for the entire year/semester.
    Step 4: Create a Concept/Contentweb.
    Step 5: Write understandings/generalizations
  • 77. 10/7/11 • page 62
    ORGANIZING CURRICULUM ASUNITS OF INSTRUCTION
    Step 1: Identify the state standards for the grade level or course for which you will develop curriculum.
    For Example:
    3rd Grade
    ESSENTIAL STANDARDS
    For Example:
    Civics & Economics
    ESSENTIAL TANDARDS
  • 78. 10/7/11 • page 63
    Step 2: Deconstruct the standards to pinpoint the types of knowledge students are expected to learn {topics, concepts, and skills} as well as the intended cognitive process.
    STATE STANDARDS
  • 79. YEARLY/SEMESTER PLAN OUTLINES
    Grade level/Course: __________________
    Step 3:Create an outline of units you may teach for the entire year or semester.
    3 to 4 units for grades K-3
    4 to 6 units for grades 4-6
    5 to 8 units for grades 7-12
  • 80. SAMPLE YEARLY PLAN OUTLINE
    Grade level/Course:Third Grade
  • 81. Sample Civics & Economics Yearly/Semester Plan Outline
    Grade level/Course:Civics & Economics
  • 82. 10/7/11 • page 67
    Brainstorm Possible Units for the Year
    Grade level/Course: __________________
  • 83. 10/7/11 • page 68
  • 84. 10/7/11 • page 69
    THIRD GRADE SAMPLE
    Step 4
    CIVICS & GOVERNMENT
    (3.C&G.2.1, 3.C&G.2.2)
    MATHEMATICS
    • number sense
    • 88. coordinate grids
    • 89. data collection
    GEOGRAPHY & ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY
    (3.G.1.1, 3.G.1.3)
    ECONOMICS & FINANCIAL LITERACY
    (3.E.1.1, 3.E.1.2, 3.E.2.1, 3.E.2.2)
    UnitTitle
    HOW DO WE MEET OUR BASIC NEEDS
    INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
    GUIDANCE
    ENGLISH/LANGUAGE ARTS
  • 10/7/11 • page 70
    Step 4
    Civics & Economics Sample
    CIVICS & GOVERNMENT
    HISTORY
    ECONOMICS & PFL
    UNIT TITLE
    The American Idea of Constitutional Government
    GEOGRAPHY & ENVIORNMENTAL LITERACY
    INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY SKILLS
    OTHER SUBJECT AREA: ENGLISH
    OTHER SUBJECT AREA: MATH
    Note: Concepts have been highlighted in blue font.
    Topics are in black.
  • 148. Step 5
    SAMPLE GENERALIZATIONS/ESSENTIAL UNDERSTANDINGS
    FOR THIRD GRADE
    Lessons of Social Studies,
    Statements of Thought
    Technology
    Society
    Change
    Needs
    Conflict
    Competition
    Resources
    Culture
    Region
    Political System
    Competition
    Resources
    Relationship Among Concepts that transfer
  • 149. Step 5
    Enduring Understandings (Generalizations)
    For High School
    Lessons of Social Studies,
    Statements of Thought
    Culture:
    1. Diverse groups contribute to cultural, social, economic
    and political development of a nation.
    2. Cultural expressions can reveal the values, lifestyles, beliefs and struggles of diverse ethnic groups.
    Technology
    History:
    Society
    Change
    3. Certain times and conditions can encourage the development of leadership in individuals.
    4. The rights of groups within a democratic society can change over time.
    Needs
    Conflict
    Competition
    Resources
    Culture
    Region
    Geography:
    Political System
    5. Physical environment affects settlement patterns.6. Physical environment can determine the way that people meet basic needs like food and shelter.
    Competition
    Resources
    Government/Civics:
    7. Governments are structured to address the basic needs of the people.8. A nation’s founding documents reflect its principles.
    Relationship Among Concepts that transfer
  • 150. 10/7/11 • page 73
    The Instructional Toolkit
    Priority Two Tools:
    Unpacking Documents for Electives
    Graphic Organizer Exemplars
    Other Tools:
    Glossary of Essential Terminology
    Sample Units of Instruction
    Assessment Samples
  • 151. 10/7/11 • page 74
    Resource Wiki Page For IHEs
    http://ssnces.ncdpi.wikispaces.net/IHE+Update+Sessions
  • 152. 10/7/11 • page 75
    Presentation images were taken from Microsoft Clipart and Flickr with the exception of those specifically sited on a particular slide.