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Power Point Team A

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  • Children learn differently than adults. The role of the adult inside the classroom changes from dependant upon the authority figure to being self-directed and using the instructor as a guide in the process. Whereas, children use the teacher as the director in their learning process and depend upon the teacher to lead them through.
  • Pedagogy is the function or work of a teacher, teaching (dictionary.com, 2008) Conceptual development should be stressed by the teacher As a personal motivator – the teacher is instilling self-esteem Green, J. (1998). Androgogy: Teaching adults. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved May 25, 2008, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/Articles/andragogy/start.htm
  • Andragogy is the methods or techniques used to teach adults (dictionary.com, 2008). The definition between the pedagogy and andragogy appear to be quite similar, yet the age factor is the difference: Adolescence versus Adulthood much like having fun and being responsible. Green, J. (1998). Androgogy: Teaching adults. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved May 25, 2008, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/Articles/andragogy/start.htm
  • Knowles developed a set of five assumptions that enveloped his concept of andragogy. The five assumptions of andragogy are that adults are self-directed learners, adult learners bring a wealth of experience to the educational setting, adults enter educational settings ready to learn, adults are problem-centered in their learning, and adults are best motivated by internal factors (Blondy, 2007, Assumptions and Process of Andragogy, ¶ 2).
  • Adults are used to controlling their own lives and come to learning with their own goals. This self directedness may be in conflict with past educational experiences. This conflict may express itself in various ways such as boredom, inattentiveness or rudeness (Saunders. 1991) A personal example would be the struggle I had with reconciling my own interests with my past reliance on the teacher as a provider of information. The unnerving freedom given during the first few U of P courses has given way to a comfort and enjoyment in creating individual knowledge.
  • Adults learn from experiences, whether the experiences are positive or negative. Adults come to learn with their experiences already in place.  Negative experiences tend to hold the adults back from learning new processes or new task. Positive experiences can be used to generalize the past experience to the new one ( Thompson, 1999).
  • Adults come to learn with their experiences already in place. For example, one prior employee in a foreign language lab was older with years of experience. The individual was responsible for overseeing the audio/video area of the lab. Audio and video technology transitioned from audio cassettes and VHS tapes to CDs and DVDs, and now audio and video streaming.  The individual had habitual ways of thinking and action and prejudices that had developed through life experiences. These experiences negatively affected the individuals learning. (Gloria Washington)
  • Adults are presumed to be ready to learn when they experience a need to know or do something to perform more effectively (Ross-Gordon, J. M., 2003, p44). Instructors should be aware of the learners specific need to know or do and relate academic theory to specific need. A personal example of this is my readiness to learn became evident when I recognized my need to have post retirement options. I knew that I needed to have extra skills or qualifications that would allow me to make some money doing something I enjoyed.
  • Use problem oriented instruction. Case studies, simulations problem solving groups make the instruction relevant to their situation. Instruction should be about tasks not memorization of content. Green, J. (1998). Androgogy: Teaching adults. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved May 25, 2008, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/Articles/andragogy/start.htm
  • Penny’s experience is that when a student at the high school level is learning, they are there because they have to be there and they have no choice. Some will learn, and some will just waste their time until it is too late. Whereas, the adult learner is motivated by various situations or conditions to their employment that will keep them focused towards the prize. (Penny Jones)
  • I like that adults participate in classroom discussion and that they are passionate about the material they are learning.  I think that adults are motivated to learn more about the classroom topics.  I think motivation from one person in the class promotes learning from the rest of the class.  Past learning experiences can provide good classroom discussions, adults have a lot of good learning experiences to discuss.  Hearing about other peoples learning experiences provides a class discussion starter and learning tool for all the students in the classroom.
  • References: Dictionary.com (2008). Andragogy. Lexico Publishing Group, LLC. Dictionary.com (2008). Pedagogy. Lexico Publishing Group, LLC.

Transcript

  • 1. Pedagogy versus Andragogy Team A: Carolyn Edmonds, Jamie Falkner, Penny Jones, Martin Mcfarlane, Lisa Moore, Gloria Washington University of Phoenix EDD/511: Adult Learning: Theories, Principles, and Applications Jennifer Vaughan-LeForce, Facilitator May 26, 2008
  • 2. Adults Learn Differently Than Children
    • Members of Team A feel that adults learn differently then children
    • This is illustrated in the team members personal learning experiences
  • 3. Child Learning (Pedagogy)
    • The function or work of a teacher in a traditional classroom:
        • Fact based lecturing is often the mode of knowledge transmission.
        • Learners rely on the instructor to direct the learning.
        • Learners are building a knowledge base and must be shown how their life experiences connect with the present learning
        • Guidance Counselor
        • Learners often see no reason for taking a particular course.
  • 4. Adult Learning (Andragogy )
    • The methods or techniques used to teach adults
        • Instructors facilitate the learners to his or her own knowledge rather than supplying them with facts
        • Instructors should use open ended questions to bring out the vast experiences of the adult learners
        • Instructors make sure the information is relevant
        • Instructors must integrate new information
          • with previous experiences
  • 5. Assumptions of Andragogy
    • Adult learner’s are self-directed
    • Adults bring experience with them to the learning environment
    • Adults enter the learning environment ready to learn
    • Adult learners are problem oriented
    • Adults are motivated to learn by internal factors
  • 6. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption One:
    • Adult learner’s are self-directed
    • For Example
      • Adults are responsible for directing their own lives
      • Adults have their own goals
      • Adults may be conflicted by their past learning experiences
      • Instructor must be a facilitator
  • 7. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption Two:
    • Adults bring experience with them to the learning environment
    • Adults come to learn with their experiences already in place.
    • Adults learn from experiences
    • Negative experiences tend to hold the adults back from learning new processes or new task
    • Positive experiences can be used to generalize the past experience to the new one
  • 8. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption Two:
    • Adults bring experience with them to the learning environment
    • For example:
      • An older employee with years of experience
      • Responsible for overseeing the audio/video technology
      • Audio and video technology transitioned from analog to digital
      • Prior experiences negatively affected learning
        • Habitual ways of thinking and actions
        • Prejudices from life experiences
  • 9. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption Three:
    • Adults enter the learning environment ready to learn
    • For example:
      • Readiness to learn is often the result of a need
      • Instructor should be aware of the learners need
      • Academic learning must relate practically to the need
  • 10. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption Four:
    • Adult learners are problem oriented
    • Learning is self-initiated and tends to last a long time.
    • Learners are goal oriented and know for what purpose they are learning new information
    • Choice in course decided by problem orientation
  • 11. Application of Assumptions
    • Assumption Five:
    • Adults are motivated to learn by internal factors
    • When teaching high school students the motivation is different from the motivation that makes the adult learn.”
    • Prime motivation has been intrinsic
  • 12. Children –vs- Adult learning strategies
    • Adult learners have high motivation.
    • Adult learners are easily intrigued by material presented in class.
    • Classroom discussion plays a big part of the learning experience for adult learners.
  • 13. References
    • Blondy,L. (2007, Summer). Evaluation and application of andragogical assumptions to the adult online learning environment. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 6(2), 116-130. Retrieved May 23, 2008, from http://www.ncolr.org/jiol/issues/PDF/6.2.3.pdf
    • Green, J. (1998). Androgogy: Teaching adults. In  B. Hoffman (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Educational Technology. Retrieved May 25, 2008, from http://coe.sdsu.edu/eet/Articles/andragogy/start.htm
    • Ross-Gordon, J. M. (2003, Summer). Adult learners in the classroom. New Directions for Student Services, 102, 43-52 Retrieved May 5, 2008 from EBSCO database
  • 14. References
    • Saunders, C. E. (1991). Pedagogy vs. andragogy: Are we treating our students like children? Military Intelligence Professional Bulletin . 17(1), 42-45. Retrieved May 19, 2008 from EBSCO database
    • Thompson, C. (1999). Adults learn differently than children. Retrieved May 23, 2008, from http://www.trainingsys.com/articles/adultslearn.html
  • 15. Let’s Celebrate Learning This Year and Every Year!