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Early Civilizations and the Rule of LawLearning Outcomes1. Trace the development of ancientcivilization from the end of th...
Kickoff Question: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
Main Idea: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
10,000 BC World Heats Up - Out of IceMesopotamian City State: Constant WarMan = Hunters & Gatherers - Nomads7,000 BC Agric...
Connecting the Notes: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
If a builder builds a house for a manand does not make its constructionsound, and the house which hehas built collapses an...
If a "sister of god" (nun) who is notliving in a convent opens a wineshop or enters a wine shop for adrink, they shall bur...
If a man is in debt and is unableto pay his creditors, he shall sellhis wife, son, or daughter, or bindthem over to servic...
If the woman has not been carefulbut has gadded about, neglectingher house and belittling herhusband, they shall throwthat...
If a son strikes hisfather, they shall thencut off his hand.
Exit Slip Question: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
Forms of GovernmentLearning Outcomes1. Justify why government is necessaryfor any functioning society.2. Characterize the ...
Kickoff Question: Forms of Government
Main Idea: Forms of Government
Democracy: Power with the PeopleOligarchy: Power with Small, Elite FewGreece = 1stDirect DemocracyRepublic: People Elect R...
Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government
Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government
Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government1. Create a government that will serve the functionsthat you as a class decide ar...
Exit Slip Question: Forms of Government1. How did you feel during the activity?2. What are some advantages anddisadvantage...
Signposts of DemocracyLearning Outcomes1. Read about various elements ofdemocracy, and sketch a signpostdiagram that shows...
Main Idea: Signposts of Democracy
 For this assignment, carefully readthe descriptions of the BasicPrinciples of democracy. On the back of your paper, dra...
Look at the following statements and decide whether each situation is a signthat a country is on the road to democracy. Wr...
Look at the following statements and decide whether each situation is a signthat a country is on the road to democracy. Wr...
Exit Slip Question: Signposts of Democracy
The Legacy of Ancient Greece and RomeLearning Outcomes1. Understand how early Greek and Roman ideasabout government eventu...
Kickoff Question: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
Main Idea: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
1stBasic Question: Who Rules?Philosophers – Use Logic and ReasonGreece = City States: Gov = How ControlGreece is 1stDem. –...
Direct Democracy Republic“Citizens” = 18 Year OldMales Vote DirectlyPeople Elect Leaders WhoMake Gov. Decisions3 Branches ...
Connecting the Notes: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
Exit Slip Question: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
Judeo-Christian TraditionLearning Outcomes1. Compare and contrast variousreligions and explore ways inwhich religion contr...
Kickoff Question: Judeo-Christian Tradition
Main Idea: Judeo-Christian Tradition
Judaism: 1 God - Live Moral LifeChristianity: 1 God, Jesus MessiahPeople Can Choose Good or Evil10 Command. = Soc. & Rel. ...
Document Questions: Do the first fourcommandments concernthemselves more with theHebrews’ relationship withGod or with on...
Exit Slip: Judeo-Christian Tradition
Democracy Develops in EnglandLearning Outcomes1. Explore key events in theestablishment of democracy inEngland including t...
Kickoff Question: Democracy Develops in England
Main Idea: Democracy Develops in England
Common Law: Jury, Judge, PrecedentHouse of Lords, House of CommonsTaxes Lead to the Magna Carta…63 Guaranteed Rights, Limi...
1180: Common Law- Trial by Jury1350’s: Two Houses of Parliament1213: Taxes Lead to Magna Carta…1215: Magna Carta Limits th...
Exit Slip: Democracy Develops in England
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
#1 Rise of Democracy
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#1 Rise of Democracy

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Transcript of "#1 Rise of Democracy"

  1. 1. Early Civilizations and the Rule of LawLearning Outcomes1. Trace the development of ancientcivilization from the end of the Ice Agethrough the rise of the Sumerians.2. Predict potential punishments for variousancient crimes, and compare your answersto actual punishments as assigned in theCode of Hammurabi.3. Explain why the development of written‘Rules of Law’ were essential to the newpermanent agricultural city-states ofMesopotamia.
  2. 2. Kickoff Question: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
  3. 3. Main Idea: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
  4. 4. 10,000 BC World Heats Up - Out of IceMesopotamian City State: Constant WarMan = Hunters & Gatherers - Nomads7,000 BC Agriculture: Permanent Homes3000 BC Sumerians – 1stYear Round Ag.‘Innocent Until Proven Guilty’ - 282 LawsRule of Law = Written Law CodeKing Hammurabi Gives ‘Code’ to Live ByBabylonians Strongest in MesopotamiaKing Hammurabi and His Written Code to Live ByEarly Civilizations and the Rule of Law
  5. 5. Connecting the Notes: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
  6. 6. If a builder builds a house for a manand does not make its constructionsound, and the house which hehas built collapses and causes thedeath of the owner of the house,the builder shall be put to death.
  7. 7. If a "sister of god" (nun) who is notliving in a convent opens a wineshop or enters a wine shop for adrink, they shall burn that woman.
  8. 8. If a man is in debt and is unableto pay his creditors, he shall sellhis wife, son, or daughter, or bindthem over to service. For 3 yearsthey shall work for their purchaser;in the 4ththey shall be free.
  9. 9. If the woman has not been carefulbut has gadded about, neglectingher house and belittling herhusband, they shall throwthat woman into the water.
  10. 10. If a son strikes hisfather, they shall thencut off his hand.
  11. 11. Exit Slip Question: Early Civilizations and the Rule of Law
  12. 12. Forms of GovernmentLearning Outcomes1. Justify why government is necessaryfor any functioning society.2. Characterize the key elements ofvarious forms of government aroundthe world.3. Simulate what it would be like toestablish a form of government fromscratch on a desolate island.
  13. 13. Kickoff Question: Forms of Government
  14. 14. Main Idea: Forms of Government
  15. 15. Democracy: Power with the PeopleOligarchy: Power with Small, Elite FewGreece = 1stDirect DemocracyRepublic: People Elect RepresentativesRome = 1stRepresentative GovernmentMonarchy: King or Queen- Divine RightHitler, Stalin, MussoliniDictatorship: 1 Person Rules - MilitaryAutocracy: One Person Holds All PowerWhy is Government Important? Human Nature, Survival of the FittestForms of Government
  16. 16. Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government
  17. 17. Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government
  18. 18. Connecting the Notes: Forms of Government1. Create a government that will serve the functionsthat you as a class decide are important (hunting,gathering, protection, etc.2. Create a list of rules to live by. How will they beenforced? What happens to those who break therules? Who makes future rules, if needed?3. Decide on a name for your civilization and create aflag or symbol that is appropriate for yourcivilization.4. Decide on roles for your group. Everyone must haveat least one.
  19. 19. Exit Slip Question: Forms of Government1. How did you feel during the activity?2. What are some advantages anddisadvantages to everybody having a say inthe decisions being made?3. What are some advantages anddisadvantages to ONE person making thedecisions?4. Based on this exercise, do you think peoplecan be trusted to govern themselves?
  20. 20. Signposts of DemocracyLearning Outcomes1. Read about various elements ofdemocracy, and sketch a signpostdiagram that shows importantelements from the reading.2. Examine multiple statements anddetermine if each statement indicateswhether or not a country is on thepath to democracy.
  21. 21. Main Idea: Signposts of Democracy
  22. 22.  For this assignment, carefully readthe descriptions of the BasicPrinciples of democracy. On the back of your paper, draw aroad. Along the road, label the 9“signposts” that each society mustpass as they make their way towarda perfect democracy. Next, list the factors which couldprevent a society from establishinga democracy. Label these signs as‘wrong turns’, ‘obstacles’ and‘dangers’ along the road. At the end of your road, write‘perfect democracy’. Then writedown some of the benefits peoplewill have in a ‘perfect democracy.’
  23. 23. Look at the following statements and decide whether each situation is a signthat a country is on the road to democracy. Write ‘Yes’ if it is, ‘No’ if it isn’t.Give reasons for your answer. 1. The Legislature has passed a law requiring all youth between the age of 4and 16 to attend school. Government schools are provided. 2. Members of one of the local churches held a political forum and onlyallowed representatives from one political party to attend. 3. The Parliament had a gallery built in their assembly room so that visitorscould watch the proceedings. 4. The constitution requires a Presidential election every five years. 5. Teachers at Park Avenue don’t like the working conditions and decide togo on strike. 6. The police stop and shoot a known criminal. The criminal was not resistingarrest but had killed other people.
  24. 24. Look at the following statements and decide whether each situation is a signthat a country is on the road to democracy. Write ‘Yes’ if it is, ‘No’ if it isn’t.Give reasons for your answer. 7. The constitution says that only people over the age of 18 who have livedin the country for more than one year may vote. 8. The constitution requires all working adults to pay a small amount ofmoney when they vote in order to help finance the expense of the election. 9. One political party, which loses the election, demands that anotherelection be held immediately. 10. The President is required to give a report to the people every yearexplaining what he or she has done and the plans for the upcoming year.
  25. 25. Exit Slip Question: Signposts of Democracy
  26. 26. The Legacy of Ancient Greece and RomeLearning Outcomes1. Understand how early Greek and Roman ideasabout government eventually influenced the rootsof our own government in the United States.2. Compose a chart that compares and contrastsearly forms of government in Greece and Rome.3. Write a brief dialogue between a Roman citizenand a Greek citizen each arguing that their styleof democracy is a better form of government.4. Trace the views of Plato and Aristotle with regardsto the rule of law and illegitimacy of tyranny.
  27. 27. Kickoff Question: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
  28. 28. Main Idea: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
  29. 29. 1stBasic Question: Who Rules?Philosophers – Use Logic and ReasonGreece = City States: Gov = How ControlGreece is 1stDem. – ‘People Rule’Direct Dem. - Active InvolvementEmperors Ruled Roman EmpireRome Written Laws: Equal / ReasonRoman Elected RepublicGreece: Legislative, Executive, JudicialGreeks Invent Democracy & Romans Add Representative GovernmentThe Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
  30. 30. Direct Democracy Republic“Citizens” = 18 Year OldMales Vote DirectlyPeople Elect Leaders WhoMake Gov. Decisions3 Branches of GovernmentLeg., Exec., Judic.2 BranchesSenate and EmperorUsed Reason to MakeNew LawsWritten Laws that Appliedto Everyone
  31. 31. Connecting the Notes: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
  32. 32. Exit Slip Question: Legacy of Ancient Greece and Rome
  33. 33. Judeo-Christian TraditionLearning Outcomes1. Compare and contrast variousreligions and explore ways inwhich religion contributed to thedevelopment of democracy.2. Assess and interpret the “10Commandments” and understandhow the document laid afoundation for modern law.
  34. 34. Kickoff Question: Judeo-Christian Tradition
  35. 35. Main Idea: Judeo-Christian Tradition
  36. 36. Judaism: 1 God - Live Moral LifeChristianity: 1 God, Jesus MessiahPeople Can Choose Good or Evil10 Command. = Soc. & Rel. RulesIndividuals Must Oppose Injustice!Religion & Democracy = Equality!Apostles Spread ChristianityJesus Death = Sins of OthersForgiveness, Love, Eternal LifeReligion Taught Self-Worth, Ethics, & the Need to Fight InjusticeJudeo-Christian Tradition
  37. 37. Document Questions: Do the first fourcommandments concernthemselves more with theHebrews’ relationship withGod or with one another? What do the last sixcommandments have incommon that distinguishthem from the first four? Create your own personal“Ten Commandments” listfor life at school or athome.
  38. 38. Exit Slip: Judeo-Christian Tradition
  39. 39. Democracy Develops in EnglandLearning Outcomes1. Explore key events in theestablishment of democracy inEngland including the Magna Carta,the English Civil War, and theGlorious Revolution.2. Synthesize key events in the road todemocracy in England by creating ananimated timeline based on theinformation discussed in the lecture.
  40. 40. Kickoff Question: Democracy Develops in England
  41. 41. Main Idea: Democracy Develops in England
  42. 42. Common Law: Jury, Judge, PrecedentHouse of Lords, House of CommonsTaxes Lead to the Magna Carta…63 Guaranteed Rights, Limits the KingParliament Must Agree to New TaxesEnglish Bill of Rights For the PeopleGlor. Rev.= Constitutional MonarchyEnglish Civil War Overthrows KingDivine Rights of Kings“What Affects All, By All Should Be Approved”Democracy Develops in England
  43. 43. 1180: Common Law- Trial by Jury1350’s: Two Houses of Parliament1213: Taxes Lead to Magna Carta…1215: Magna Carta Limits the King1216: King Must Check w/ Parliament1689: English Bill of Rights for People1642: English Civil War Executes King 1603: Divine Right for KingsAssignment Directions: Below is a list of 8 events that led to the spread of democracy in England.On the back of this piece of paper, put the events in order by creating ananimated “Timeline of Democracy in England”. For each event on your timeline, draw a simple sketch explaining theevent. Be sure to add color to your sketches and your timeline!
  44. 44. Exit Slip: Democracy Develops in England

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