Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: Effective Employer Engagement
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Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: Effective Employer Engagement

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  • President To think that was a once proud institution (Walden College—I wonder what we were once proud of--- Dean enters the President’s office and hands him a report— President What am I looking at? – Dean A report on what college students are learning today—it’s based on testing that measures critical thinking, complex reasoning and writing skills---almost half the kids tested made no gains after two years of college. It turns out they spend three times as many hours socializing as studying— President : Shocking. C'mon Dean. That’s why they come! And as long as we give them good grades an a degree. Their parents are happy too! Who cares if they can’t Reason?--- Dean responds-- um…employers? In the last panel we see an employer interviewing a graduate—Any special reason you're late son? Student --Yes Sir. I got trapped in a paper bag.
  • The Manufacturing Institute The Manufacturing Institute is the authority on the attraction, qualification, and development of world-class manufacturing talent. Affiliated with the NAM [SLIDE TRANSITION]
  • Key Point – There is also a serious disconnect in workforce strategies used by manufacturers. The number one talent recruitment strategy used by manufacturers is word of mouth, not through education Extended Version: Part of the blame for the lack of skilled workers rests with manufacturers though. When we asked how companies found new workers, over half said that they rely on word-of-mouth to fill positions. After that, it was staffing agencies and on-line job boards. If you look at the bottom of the list, you find community colleges and technical schools. This is where the talent is really being created and where manufacturers should be looking to supply their workforce. Extended Script Now, to be fair, manufacturers were as much responsible for this situation as students, parents, and schools. During the leaning process, many companies cut their training budgets to a minimum, eliminating the traditional, months-long training programs that new hires would enter. Few manufacturers had a choice in this regard though, because the cost of such programs was now prohibitive in the global economy. When we asked how companies found new workers, over half said that they rely on word-of-mouth to fill positions. After that, it was staffing agencies and on-line job boards. If you look at the bottom of the list, you find community colleges and technical schools. This is where the talent is really being created and where manufacturers should be looking to supply their workforce.
  • Key Point – There is a serious crisis facing our nation. The Manufacturing Institute developed and is currently implementing solutions to help us close the skills gap and fill our talent pipeline. The overarching solution is the NAM-Endorsed Skills Certification System. Extended Version: In response to this crisis, The Manufacturing Institute has developed and is implementing solutions that will position the U.S. to “grow our own” talent. For four years now, the Manufacturing Institute has been working on a solution to the skills gap. Our solution is based on the idea that manufacturers have incredibly strict standards for nearly every material and machine used in the industry except one – our human capital. Therefore, let’s apply a set of standards to our workforce that ensures a level of skills and competence needed in today’s manufacturing sector.
  • Aligning to these certifications as an essential part of the classes and pathways – e.g. machining
  • So what is the value to employers? Lower recruiting costs Lower entry-level training costs Improved employee retention Improved opportunities for advancement Improved employee engagement and input Lower relocation costs Improved workplace safety [SLIDE TRANSITION]
  • For manufacturers, we begin to direct them to quality programs. The M-List (around 50 colleges nation wide) recognizes high schools, community colleges, technical schools, and universities that are teaching manufacturing students to industry standards.  Specifically, these schools offer students the opportunity to earn  NAM-Endorsed Manufacturing Skills Certifications as a standard part of their manufacturing education programs.  So what is the value to employers? Lower recruiting costs Lower entry-level training costs Improved employee retention Improved opportunities for advancement Improved employee engagement and input Lower relocation costs Improved workplace safety
  • [SLIDE TRANSITION]
  • Join National Manufacturing Day Manufacturing Day has been designed to expand knowledge about and improve general public perception of manufacturing careers and manufacturing's value to the U.S. economy. Manufacturing Day is for students, parents, educators, media, customers, suppliers and the community at large. Visitors will learn about real career opportunities, training, and resources. In addition, manufacturers will learn about business improvement resources and services delivered through manufacturing extension partnerships. [SLIDE TRANSITION]
  • Have developed 15 energy related standards and are now expanding to Smart Grid modules and occupations (i.e. Smart Grid Customer Service Representative)
  • Portable tool that makes the applicant more valuable by creating perceived value to both employers and employees. Sometimes employers worry that another company will steal their qualified, credentialed workers—but I believe we (industry partners) are all in this together – that we all want quality workers. We create synergies by working together —the regional approach is absolutely valuable. We can’t afford to do this work on our own. The conversation among partners is as valuable as the products (primarily skill standards in our case) that come out of our partnership.

Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: Effective Employer Engagement Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: Effective Employer Engagement Presentation Transcript

  • Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: Effective Employer Engagement Second in a series of three webinars: Webinar 3: What Can Colleges Do? Nov. 5th
  • 2  All Attendees are muted. To be unmuted, you will need to have entered your PIN.  Please don’t put call on “hold”!  Ask ?s in Question box or “Raise Hand”  Bad connection? Hang up and dial back in  Technical Support: 888- 259-8414, ext. 1 958-020-546 Enter the Audio PIN shown on your screen! Raise/lower your hand Send comments and ask questions here! (646) 307-1716
  • Today’s Presenters Dr. Keith Bird CSW Brent Weil Manufacturing Institute at NAM Troy Nutter Puget Sound Energy & PNCECE Partnership Moderator Melodee Mabbitt, CSW
  • Upcoming Report Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials Thanks to the Surdna Foundation for their support of this important work Slides available at www.skilledwork.org
  • What is a competency-based credential?  Accurately assures competencies, based on skills and knowledge of the holder  Awarded based on demonstration of those competencies  Aligns with specific industry standards and founded on the skills/competencies needed by employers
  • Current State of Play… In a nutshell Competency-based credentialing as a concept resonates widely Large-scale adoption and use needs:  Transparency (common language, registries)  Interoperability (quality assurance, data infrastructure)  Making the Return on Investment clear to employers, job seekers, and educators
  • Building the Market: Five Key Elements
  • 8
  • Employers as Strategic Partners… Beyond Business Advisory Committees 9
  • 10 Employers as Advisors Employers as Strategic Partners Attend Business Advisory Committee meetings once or twice a year to provide high level curriculum input and discuss labor market opportunities Are engaged in numerous ways: • Identifying critical competencies • Curriculum and assessment design • Work- based learning • Internships (students and faculty) •Providing adjunct faculty and equipment •Mapping Career Pathways Respond to surveys and report placement data Help design surveys, use their connections to increase the survey response rate, and partner in designing the success metrics. Work one-on-one with the workforce units in colleges to get their individual (customized) training needs met. Work with colleges (both technical/academic and workforce units)and their partners over time to address workforce development needs, especially in sector/cluster approaches among groups of employers in industries important to the regional economy.
  • 11 Employers as Advisors Employers as Strategic Partners Hire graduates as needed from existing programs. Work with colleges to identify and map career pathway opportunities for students/workers, fill program gaps as necessary, and establish an adequate pipeline of qualified workers. Talk about the importance of higher skills and advise on curriculum. Work with colleges and provide subject matter experts (SMEs) to identify the competencies and skill standards needed; design relevant curriculum and assessments; and develop and use market relevant credentials. Participate sporadically on an “as needed” basis when asked by college or program staff. Are engaged on an ongoing basis in program design and refinement, and hire the graduates of the program on a regular basis because they have confidence in their skills preparation.
  • The Evolution of the Business-Education Partnerships “Off the shelf” course offerings Needs assessment/customized training Organizational development approach (“Trusted Partner” – often one on one) Deep engagement in an industry- shared ownership of standards, curriculum and assessments (Provide solutions through cross industry and regional sector partnerships)
  • Industry (Sector) Partnership “Sustained Employer Engagement” 7 Success Factors 13
  • 7 Success Factors 1. Strategic recruitment of employers 2. Ensure that the partnership is employer led and driven 3. Have diversified and regular contact with employers, including face-to-face meetings 4. Align your activities and tactics with your strategic goals and the core workforce challenges of your industry • Solutions driven, not program driven 14
  • 7 Success Factors 5. Understand the critical role of the convener/intermediary in building and maintaining employer engagement (“glue”) 6. Understand the role of funding, leveraging and incentives to engage employers 7. Identify, measure, and communicate outcomes; and ensure that employers clearly see the value of their engagement 15
  • Siemens business units see value in its use of competency-based credentials  Well-Trained, Work-Ready Technical Workers. The Siemens Mechatronics Systems Certification emphasizes in-demand industrial skills, troubleshooting, and hands-on practice, providing employers with knowledgeable workers, who are able to easily move into a variety of production, technician, and/or engineering roles.  Objective Certification of Workers’ Technical Skills. The certifications provide an objective, industry-aligned assessment of mechanical, electrical, and digital technical skills, troubleshooting, and mechatronic systems thinking.  Cost Savings on Training and Education. Companies and industries can receive much-needed skilled technical workers while drawing on local education and training resources instead of always relying on private training companies.
  • Brent Weil Senior Vice President The Manufacturing Institute
  • 18 The Manufacturing Institute is the authority on the attraction, qualification, and development of world-class manufacturing talent.
  • Manufacturers Need New Workforce Strategies Top sources for new employees 52% 40% 40% 32% 26% 18% 15% 14% 8% 6% Word of mouth Staffing agencies Online Job Boards Newspaper Ads Company recruiting function External search firms Company Websites Tech schools Community colleges Other The Manufacturing Institute & Deloitte - October 2011
  • Competency-based, customized education and training for the manufacturing workforce 21
  • Founding Partners Partners
  •  Lower recruiting costs  Lower entry-level training costs  Improved employee retention  Improved opportunities for advancement  Improved employee engagement and input  Lower relocation costs  Improved workplace safety Values Associated with Credentialing
  •  Certified Students  Certified Instructors  Certified Schools Quality Workforce
  • National Impact Requires State and Regional Champions
  • October 4, 2013October 4, 2013 http://www.mfgday.com/
  •  The Manufacturing Institute Website: www.themanufacturinginstitute.org  Employer Resources  Certification Information  Webinar Series  Join our Mailing List  The M-List: www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/Skills-Certification/  Employer Toolkit: www.themanufacturinginstitute.org/Skills-Certification/ Resources
  • Brent Weil Senior Vice President The Manufacturing Institute E-mail: bweil@nam.org www.themanufacturinginstitute.org @TheMfgInstitute Contact Information
  • Troy Nutter  Manager, Operational Training for Puget Sound Energy  On PNCECE Board for 8 years  Primary roles on Board:  Chair, DOE Smart Grid Training Grant Governance Board  Chair, DOL WIRED Grant Executive Leadership Team  Industry representative
  • Pacific Northwest Center of Excellence for Clean Energy: A Centralia College (WA) Partnership cleanenergyexcellence.org  Formed in 2004 as the Center of Excellence for Energy Technology with Centralia College as convener– now serves five states  Deep industry engagement: Involves major power generation plants (coal, hydro, and wind), plus major public utilities around the state 30
  • Pacific Northwest Center of Excellence for Clean Energy: A Centralia College (WA) Partnership cleanenergyexcellence.org  Key partners are Labor, community colleges, workforce boards, and industry experts  Products include articulated “skills standards” for key occupations, shared purchase of key curriculum, a revised apprenticeship program, and the creation of a hands-on training facility at an un-used nuclear power plant 31
  • Value of establishing and using skill standards  Industry workforce planning  Apprenticeship  Direct link/alignment between college courses and work based apprenticeship  Common language  Contextualization  Military skill crosswalks
  • How do credentials and credentialing fit into the skills standards picture?  Portable tool with value  We (industry partners) are all in this together – we all want quality workers. We create synergies by working together.  Conversation among partners is as valuable as the products.  We share common concerns and develop solutions through a strategic approach.
  • What will the partnership (Center) be pursuing in the future?  Identify the foundational skills that apply across all of our skill standards—those competencies that are common across all occupations.  Work with K-12 to integrate those foundational skills into their curriculum through contextualization.  Additional skill panels across the industry to expand our deeper understanding of the competencies required.
  • Questions?
  • Next Webinar Making a Market for Competency-Based Credentials: What Can Colleges Do? November 5- 1:00 – 2:15 ET Presenters:  Maria Coons, Harper College, IL  Barbara Hins-Turner, Pacific NW Center of Excellence for Clean Energy, Centralia College, WA  Becky Nickoli, Ivy Tech, IN  Jeannine La Prad and Keith Bird, CSW •NCWE Conference Session- Oct.17- Milwaukee