Wednesday, April 20, 2011<br />Grammar/Writing: Challenge and Revision<br />Speaking: Voice Work<br />Literature:  Poetry ...
Housekeeping<br />book deposit slips<br />still marking exams   Will be done for next week<br />
Voice Work<br />In preparation for your oral presentations, we will do a little bit of voice work over the next few classe...
Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />
Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Think of it as “deep belly breathing”<br />Focus on breathing from your lower abdomen, not yo...
Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Try it now:<br />Keep your mouth slightly open<br />Put your hands on your belly<br />Exhale ...
Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Try it at home:<br />Lie on the floor<br />Place a book on your stomach<br />Repeat the same ...
Projection<br />Projection does NOT = loudness<br />Projection <br />= how well your voice travels across a distance<br />...
Projection<br />Shouting is not always effective and may actually damage your voice<br />You need to *focus* your voice to...
Projection Practice #1<br />Stand in a large room<br />Visually choose a spot on the back wall<br />Get into a comfortable...
Projection Practice #2<br />Stand in a large room<br /> Choose a focal point midway between you and the back of the room<b...
Poetry<br />Intro – what is poetry<br />Why do we read/write poetry?<br />What are the characteristics of poetry<br />
Sound in Poetry<br />The first poems ever created were sung or spoken aloud.<br />When we hear a poem, its sound, or music...
Sound in Poetry<br />We’re going to look at how sound is used in two different poems:  <br />“Annabel Lee,” by Edgar Allan...
Sound in Poetry<br />“The best way to approach a poem . . .”<br />The first time –  read it without stopping, listen to th...
Sound in Poetry<br />So, while I read each poem aloud, listen without worrying too much about the meaning for now.  <br />...
Sound in Poetry<br />Which poem has the most resonance (impact) on you?  Why?  (There is no right answer here!)<br />
Sound in Poetry<br />Now, re-read each poem on your own, paying attention to both meaning and sound.<br />Consult the voca...
Sound in Poetry<br />Reviewing the Selections – Answers<br />c<br />a<br />d<br />c<br />b or d <br />
Sound in Poetry<br />Interpreting the Selections<br />d<br />a<br />c<br />b<br />b<br />
Break<br />
Grammar Challenge<br />Directions:  Try to identify the error and then fix it.<br />Try to keep the cone shape, this figur...
Grammar Challenge<br />The food are placed in similar containers.<br />Error: Subject-verb agreement<br />Correction:  The...
Grammar Challenge<br />He told us to ignore traditional job search rules because few bosses find the clerks this way.<br /...
Grammar Challenge<br />First, he woke up late in the morning and expected me to wait at the lobby for him.<br />Error:  pr...
Revision<br />Review my corrections<br />Rewrite the paragraph, making as many of the corrections as you can<br />Ask me i...
Homework<br />Read the remainder of the poetry handout.  Make notes on the circled questions only.  Be prepared to discuss...
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E10 apr120 2011

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  • “The best way to approach a poem . . .”The first time – read it all the way through without stopping. Listen to its soundsnotice the punctuation, the pauses, and listen for the repetition of sounds and the rhymes.Then, re-read the poem several times. Notice how the poet uses sound to emphasize certain words or phrases.
  • Try to connect responses with mood, sound, etc.
  • E10 apr120 2011

    1. 1. Wednesday, April 20, 2011<br />Grammar/Writing: Challenge and Revision<br />Speaking: Voice Work<br />Literature: Poetry - Sound<br />
    2. 2. Housekeeping<br />book deposit slips<br />still marking exams  Will be done for next week<br />
    3. 3. Voice Work<br />In preparation for your oral presentations, we will do a little bit of voice work over the next few classes, including<br />diaphragmatic breathing<br />articulation<br />projection<br />expression<br />
    4. 4. Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />
    5. 5. Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Think of it as “deep belly breathing”<br />Focus on breathing from your lower abdomen, not your chest.<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kQW5YMsBlk<br />http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNsabYfAVtU<br />
    6. 6. Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Try it now:<br />Keep your mouth slightly open<br />Put your hands on your belly<br />Exhale all the air out of your belly<br />Naturally, let the air enter your mouth (inhale)<br />Feel your belly fill with air, like a balloon!<br />
    7. 7. Diaphragmatic Breathing<br />Try it at home:<br />Lie on the floor<br />Place a book on your stomach<br />Repeat the same breathing method, feeling how your belly moves up and down, in and out with the movement of your diaphragm<br />
    8. 8. Projection<br />Projection does NOT = loudness<br />Projection <br />= how well your voice travels across a distance<br />= how well it can be heard regardless of volume<br />
    9. 9. Projection<br />Shouting is not always effective and may actually damage your voice<br />You need to *focus* your voice to a particular spot and to speak clearly and with continuous control<br />To do this, you need to begin with diaphragmatic breathing (from your belly).<br />
    10. 10. Projection Practice #1<br />Stand in a large room<br />Visually choose a spot on the back wall<br />Get into a comfortable position<br />Take a deep breath (push your belly out)<br />Project the vowels of your name to that spot on the wall<br /> Ex: i — e — e<br />Then, project your whole name to that spot<br />Repeat, this time with your arms over your head. You should notice your sound is louder because you have more air power. Your goal is to be able to do this in a normal position.<br />
    11. 11. Projection Practice #2<br />Stand in a large room<br /> Choose a focal point midway between you and the back of the room<br />Using diaphragmatic breathing, project your voice to that point<br />Speak nursery rhymes, lines of poetry, or song lyrics that you know.<br />After practicing several times, ask a partner to sit in that spot and tell you how well you are doing.<br />
    12. 12. Poetry<br />Intro – what is poetry<br />Why do we read/write poetry?<br />What are the characteristics of poetry<br />
    13. 13. Sound in Poetry<br />The first poems ever created were sung or spoken aloud.<br />When we hear a poem, its sound, or music, is usually the most noticeable thing about it.<br />This sound is created by repetition, rhyme, rhythm, and meter.<br />These elements help you to remember the poem and also often reinforce its meaning.<br />
    14. 14. Sound in Poetry<br />We’re going to look at how sound is used in two different poems: <br />“Annabel Lee,” by Edgar Allan Poe<br />“Recuerdo,” by Edna St. Vincent Millay<br /> Turn to p. 7 - “The best way . . . <br />
    15. 15. Sound in Poetry<br />“The best way to approach a poem . . .”<br />The first time – read it without stopping, listen to the sounds<br />notice punctuation, pauses<br />listen for repetition, rhyme, <br />Then, re-read the poem several times<br />notice how sound emphasizes words<br />
    16. 16. Sound in Poetry<br />So, while I read each poem aloud, listen without worrying too much about the meaning for now. <br />Focus on the sound of each poem. <br />Notice<br />punctuation, pauses<br />Listen for <br />repetition, rhyme<br />
    17. 17. Sound in Poetry<br />Which poem has the most resonance (impact) on you? Why? (There is no right answer here!)<br />
    18. 18. Sound in Poetry<br />Now, re-read each poem on your own, paying attention to both meaning and sound.<br />Consult the vocabulary on p. 8 as needed.<br />Then, complete “Reviewing the Selections” and “Interpreting the Selections.”<br />You have ______ minutes to complete this task.<br />
    19. 19. Sound in Poetry<br />Reviewing the Selections – Answers<br />c<br />a<br />d<br />c<br />b or d <br />
    20. 20. Sound in Poetry<br />Interpreting the Selections<br />d<br />a<br />c<br />b<br />b<br />
    21. 21. Break<br />
    22. 22. Grammar Challenge<br />Directions: Try to identify the error and then fix it.<br />Try to keep the cone shape, this figure gives the maximal burning volume for the fire.<br />Error: Run-on<br />Corrections: . . . cone shape; this figure . . .<br /> . . . cone shape, for . . .<br /> . . . cone shape because . . .<br />
    23. 23. Grammar Challenge<br />The food are placed in similar containers.<br />Error: Subject-verb agreement<br />Correction: The food is placed . . . <br />
    24. 24. Grammar Challenge<br />He told us to ignore traditional job search rules because few bosses find the clerks this way.<br />Error: unnecessary article “the”<br />Corrections: <br />. . . find clerks this way . . . (any clerks)<br />. . . find their clerks . . . (the ones they hire)<br />
    25. 25. Grammar Challenge<br />First, he woke up late in the morning and expected me to wait at the lobby for him.<br />Error: preposition “at”<br />Correction: . . . wait in the lobby . . .<br />(It is true that “at” is used for specific locations; however, in this case, that location is inside a building, so we use “in.”)<br />
    26. 26. Revision<br />Review my corrections<br />Rewrite the paragraph, making as many of the corrections as you can<br />Ask me if you can’t understand the editing mark or what kind of change should be made<br />Out of possible /3 marks<br />
    27. 27. Homework<br />Read the remainder of the poetry handout. Make notes on the circled questions only. Be prepared to discuss these in class. Due Wednesday, April 27th.<br />

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