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Serving the Biomedical Research Community

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for an interview, 2005

for an interview, 2005

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  • In 1945, Vannevar Bush imagined a future where individuals would have their own mechanized information system; his imagined device, the Memex, would contain books, records, and communications which could be deftly manipulated and organized at the touch of a button. Though some later visions of fully electronic libraries have not yet come to pass, Bush’s vision of a paperless information system was eerily prescient; technology has allowed the individual to access, store, and manage information in amazing ways. For example, people can now access journal articles 24 hours a day, create and organize personalized databases, and make their research available across the world instantaneously. As technology progressed through the past 6 decades, library staff have recognized that their traditional roles and duties required adaptation to the new information society. Technology has changed libraries and library staff forever. Contrary to fears of obsolescence such as those evoked by Katherine Hepburn’s character in the 1957 movie, Desk Set, library staff are still needed in an automated environment. Automation has merely allowed us to take on new roles and opportunities to better serve our communities. Today, I am going to briefly talk about some of the challenges health sciences libraries face in today’s environment, as well as the opportunities we have to meet these challenges and the new roles we are taking on. Sapp, G., & Gilmour, R. (2002). A brief history of the future of academic libraries: predictions and speculations from the literature of the profession, 1975 to 2000--part one, 1975 to 1989--. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 2 (4), 553-576. Bush, V. (1945). As we may think. Atlantic Monthly, 176 (1), 101-108. Fully electronic libraries: Lancaster, F. W. (1978). Toward paperless information systems . New York: Academic Press. Thompson, J. (1983). The end of libraries . London: Clive Bingley.

Serving the Biomedical Research Community Serving the Biomedical Research Community Presentation Transcript

  • Serving the Biomedical Research Community Future Roles, Challenges, and Opportunities Melissa Rethlefsen 5/4/05
  • Serving the Biomedical Research Community
    • Changing roles: consultations, web authoring, informationist, outreach
    • Scholarly communication: serials, open access, digital repositories
    • Increasing library visibility: faculty liaisons, virtual presence, library as place
  • In-Depth Reference
    • Point of need instruction
    • Consultations
  • Web Authoring
    • Toolkits
    • Quality-filtered resources
    • Pathfinders
    • Tutorials
  • The Informationist
    • What is an informationist ?
      • Specialized knowledge of field and information science
      • Skills include:
        • Information retrieval
        • Analysis
        • Synthesis
  • The Informationist
    • Clinical
      • Grand Rounds
      • Patient care teams
    • Bioinformationist
    • Public health
  • Outreach
    • Communities
      • Public librarians
      • Community organizations
    • Professionals without libraries
      • Rural health professionals
      • Public health
  • Outreach Opportunities
    • Training and capacity building
      • PubMed
      • MedlinePlus
    • Document delivery
    • Web resources
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Serials costs increase yearly
      • Cutting subscriptions
      • Purchasing electronic-only subscriptions
      • Subscribing to “big deal” to maintain costs
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Higher costs increase publisher market share*
    • Libraries forced into access model
    • Publishers control historical record
    • *Office of Fair Trading. (2002). The market for scientific, technical, and medical journals: a statement by the OFT [OFT396] . London: Office of Fair Trading.
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Interlibrary loan, document delivery
      • Fewer rare titles
      • Restrictions on electronic titles
    • Copyright law versus contract law
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Collection development
    • “ Big deal” subscriptions increase use of included titles
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Reshape scholarly communication
      • Digital repositories
      • Open access initiatives
      • Digital preservation
  • Scholarly Communication
    • Influence faculty publication
      • Open access initiatives
        • Support open access financially
        • Encourage tenure committees to consider
        • Discourage impact factor decisions
      • Cancel “big deal” and high-priced subscriptions
  • Campus Visibility
    • Need to increase visibility of library
    • Communicate library’s value
    • Students
      • Using search engines
      • Plagiarism, poor quality information
  • Campus Visibility
    • Increase visibility to faculty
      • Faculty liaison
      • “ Blended librarian”
  • Campus Visibility
    • Increase visibility
      • Leadership positions outside library
      • Go to faculty
      • Satellite libraries
    • Information literacy
      • Leadership in curriculum development
      • Credit courses
  • Campus Visibility
    • Virtual presence
      • Instructional technology
      • Virtual reference
      • Web authoring
  • Campus Visibility
    • Library as place
      • Group study space
      • Multimedia equipment
      • Attractive, comfortable
      • Coffee shops
    • Information commons
      • Supports cooperative learning
      • Help with technology, finding information
  • University Libraries’ Mission
    • “ The mission of the University Libraries is to enhance access to and maintain the record of human thought, knowledge, and culture for current and future users . The University Libraries support and contribute to the University’s three-fold mission of research and discovery, teaching and learning, and outreach and public service through the development of collections, delivery of services, and creative applications of information technologies.”
  • Serving the Community
    • New roles, new services, new communities
    • Serving current and future communities by shaping scholarly communication
    • Increasing visibility to better serve physical and virtual library users
  • Roles, Challenges, Opportunities
    • “Can libraries survive in the largely electronic world?...If libraries and librarians will be needed, what functions will they perform, and who will perform them?” –F.W. Lancaster, 1978
  • References
    • AAHSL Charting the Future Task Force. (2003). Building on success: charting the future of knowledge management within the academic health center . Chicago, Ill: Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries.
    • ACRL Scholarly Communications Committee. (2003). Principles and strategies for the reform of scholarly communication . Washington, DC: Association of College & Research Libraries.
    • Albanese, A. R. (2003, April 15). Deserted no more. Library Journal, 127, 34-36.
    • Basler, T. G. (2005). Community outreach partnerships. Ref Serv Rev, 33 (1), 31-37.
    • Bell, S. J., & Shank, J. (2004). The blended librarian: a blueprint for redefining the teaching and learning role of academic librarians. College & Research Libraries News, 65 (7), 372-375.
    • Bush, V. (1945). As we may think. Atlantic Monthly, 176 (1), 101-108.
    • Gray, S. A., Brower, S., Munger, H., Start, A., & White, P. (2001). Redefining reference in an academic health sciences library: planning for change. Med Ref Serv Q, 20 (3), 1-11.
    • Kempke, K. (2002). The art of war for librarians: academic culture, curriculum reform, and wisdom from Sun Tzu. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 2 (4), 529-551.
    • Kronenfeld, M. R. (2005). Trends in academic health sciences libraries and their emergence as the "knowledge nexus" for their academic health centers. J Med Libr Assoc, 93 (1), 32-39.
    • Lancaster, F. W. (1978). Toward paperless information systems . New York: Academic Press.
    • Lawson, R., & Lawson, P. (2002). Libraries in a bind: Ownership versus access. Journal of Consumer Affairs, 36 (2), 295-298.
    • Lindberg, D. A. B., & Humphreys, B. (2005). 2015--the future of medical libraries. N Engl J Med, 352 (11), 1067-1070.
    • Lombardi, J. V. (2000). Academic libraries in a digital age [DOI 10.1045]. D-Lib Magazine, 6 (10).
    • Lynch, C. (2003). Institutional repositories: essential infrastructures for scholarship in the digital age [ARL Bimonthly Report 226] : Association of Research Libraries.
    • MacWhinnie, L. (2003). The information commons: the academic library of the future. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 3 (2), 241-257.
    • Office of Fair Trading. (2002). The market for scientific, technical, and medical journals: a statement by the OFT [OFT396] . London: Office of Fair Trading.
    • Sapp, G., & Gilmour, R. (2002). A brief history of the future of academic libraries: predictions and speculations from the literature of the profession, 1975 to 2000--part one, 1975 to 1989--. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 2 (4), 553-576.
    • Sapp, G., & Gilmour, R. (2003). A brief history of the future of academic libraries: predictions and speculations from the literature of the profession, 1975 to 2000--part two, 1990-2000-. portal: Libraries and the Academy, 3 (1), 13-34.
    • Scherrer, C. S. (2002). New measures for new roles: defining and measuring the current practices of health sciences librarians. J Med Libr Assoc, 90 (2), 164-172.
    • Schonfeld, R. C., King, D. W., Okerson, A., & Fenton, E. G. (2004). The non-subscription side of periodicals: changes in library operations and costs between print and electronic formats . Washington, DC: Council on Library and Information Resources.
    • Shank, J., & Dewald, N. H. (2003). Establishing our presence in courseware: adding library services to the virtual classroom. Information Technology and Libraries, 22 (1), 38.
    • Shipman, J. P. (2004). Why emerging roles for health sciences librarians? Ref Serv Rev, 32 (1), 9-12.
    • Steinbrook, R. (2005). Public access to NIH research. N Engl J Med, 352 (17), 1739-1741.
    • Thompson, J. (1983). The end of libraries . London: Clive Bingley.
    • Watson, L. A., Login, I. S., & Burns, J. M. (2003). Exploring new ways of publishing: a library-faculty partnership. J Med Libr Assoc, 91 (2), 245-247.