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Forces & Motion
Book M - Chapter 2
Warmup

If Wile E. Coyote and a boulder fall off a cliff at
the same time, which do you think will hit the
ground first?
Section 1: Gravity and Motion
By the end of this section, you should be able to:
 Explain the effect of gravity and air r...
Gravity and Falling Objects
 Objects fall to the ground at the same rate

because the acceleration due to gravity is the
...
Calculating the Velocity of Falling Objects
Δv  g · t
change in velocity = accelerationgravity · time

 If an object sta...
Warmup

Complete #7 on p.43
Calculating Time
Katey drops a ball off the top of a parking
garage. Dakota uses a radar gun to determine
the speed of the...
Air Resistance and Falling Objects
 Air resistance is the force that opposes the

motion of objects through air.
 The am...
Air Resistance and Falling Objects
 The upward force of air resistance continues

to increase until it is equal to the do...
Air Resistance and Falling Objects
 An object is in free fall only if gravity is pulling

it down and no other forces are...
Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall
 Astronauts float in orbiting spacecrafts

because of free fall.
Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall
 An object is orbiting when it is traveling

around another object in space.
Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall
 The unbalanced force that causes objects to

move in a circular path is called a centr...
Projectile Motion and Gravity
 Projectile motion is the curved path an object

follows when it is thrown or propelled nea...
Projectile Motion and Gravity
 Horizontal motion is a motion that is parallel to

the ground.
 When you throw a ball, yo...
Projectile Motion and Gravity
 Vertical motion is motion that is perpendicular

to the ground.
 A ball in your hand is p...
Section Review

p.43 #2-7, 9
Warmup
If you are sitting still in your seat on a bus that is
traveling 100 km/h on a highway, is your body
at rest or in ...
Section 2: Newton’s Laws of Motion
By the end of this section, you should be able to:
 Describe Newton’s first law of mot...
Newton’s First Law of Motion
 An object at rest remains at rest, and an

object in motion remains in motion at a
constant...
Newton’s First Law of Motion
 Part 1: Objects at rest will stay at rest unless

they are acted on by an unbalanced force.
Newton’s First Law of Motion
 Part 2: Objects will continue to move with the

same velocity unless an unbalanced force
ac...
Newton’s First Law of Motion
 Newton’s first law is sometimes called the law

of inertia. Inertia is the tendency of all ...
Newton’s First Law of Motion
 So, changing the motion of an object that has

a small mass is easier than changing the
mot...
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
 The acceleration of an object depends on the

mass of the object and the amount of force
a...
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
 Part 1: The acceleration of an object

decreases as its mass increases. Its
acceleration i...
Newton’s Second Law of Motion
Newton’s Second Law of Motion

Newton’s Third Law of Motion
 Whenever one object exerts a force on a

second object, the second object exerts an
equal a...
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
 A force is always exerted by one object on

another object. This rule is true for all
force...
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
 Action and reaction forces in a pair do not act

on the same object. If they did, the net f...
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
 Newton’s third law says that all forces act in

pairs. When a force is exerted, there is al...
Newton’s Third Law of Motion
 When an object falls, gravity pulls the object

toward Earth and pulls Earth toward the
obj...
Section Review

p.51 #2-6, 8
Warmup

Make a list of 5 things you think have
momentum and 5 things you think don’t have
momentum.
Section 3: Momentum
By the end of this section, you should be able to:
 Calculate the momentum of moving objects.
 Expla...
Momentum, Mass, and Velocity
 The momentum of an object depends on the

object’s mass and velocity.
Calculating Momentum

Calculating Momentum
The Law of Conservation of Momentum
 The law of conservation of momentum states

that any time objects collide, the total...
The Law of Conservation of Momentum
 The combined objects have a different

velocity because momentum is conserved and
de...
The Law of Conservation of Momentum
 When two objects bounce off each

other, momentum is usually transferred from
one ob...
The Law of Conservation of Momentum
 Conservation of momentum can be explained by

Newton’s third law.
 Because action a...
Section Review

p.55 #2-7
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
Forces & Motion
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Transcript of "Forces & Motion"

  1. 1. Forces & Motion Book M - Chapter 2
  2. 2. Warmup If Wile E. Coyote and a boulder fall off a cliff at the same time, which do you think will hit the ground first?
  3. 3. Section 1: Gravity and Motion By the end of this section, you should be able to:  Explain the effect of gravity and air resistance on falling objects.  Explain why objects in orbit are in free fall and appear to be weightless.  Describe how projectile motion is affected by gravity.
  4. 4. Gravity and Falling Objects  Objects fall to the ground at the same rate because the acceleration due to gravity is the same for all objects.  For every second that an object falls, the object’s downward velocity increases by 9.8 m/s.
  5. 5. Calculating the Velocity of Falling Objects Δv  g · t change in velocity = accelerationgravity · time  If an object starts at rest, this equation yields the velocity of the object after a certain time period.
  6. 6. Warmup Complete #7 on p.43
  7. 7. Calculating Time Katey drops a ball off the top of a parking garage. Dakota uses a radar gun to determine the speed of the ball when it hits the ground is 44.1 m/s. How long was the ball in the air?
  8. 8. Air Resistance and Falling Objects  Air resistance is the force that opposes the motion of objects through air.  The amount of air resistance acting on an object depends on the size, shape, and speed of the object.  As the speed of a falling object increases, air resistance increases.
  9. 9. Air Resistance and Falling Objects  The upward force of air resistance continues to increase until it is equal to the downward force of gravity.  The object then falls at a constant velocity called the terminal velocity.
  10. 10. Air Resistance and Falling Objects  An object is in free fall only if gravity is pulling it down and no other forces are acting on it.  A vacuum is a place in which there is no matter. Objects falling in a vacuum are in free fall because there is no air resistance.
  11. 11. Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall  Astronauts float in orbiting spacecrafts because of free fall.
  12. 12. Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall  An object is orbiting when it is traveling around another object in space.
  13. 13. Orbiting Objects are in Free Fall  The unbalanced force that causes objects to move in a circular path is called a centripetal force.  Gravity provides the centripetal force that keeps objects in orbit.
  14. 14. Projectile Motion and Gravity  Projectile motion is the curved path an object follows when it is thrown or propelled near the surface of the Earth.  Projectile motion has two components— horizontal motion and vertical motion. These components are independent, so they have no effect on each other.
  15. 15. Projectile Motion and Gravity  Horizontal motion is a motion that is parallel to the ground.  When you throw a ball, your hand exerts a force on the ball that makes the ball move forward. This force gives the ball its horizontal motion.
  16. 16. Projectile Motion and Gravity  Vertical motion is motion that is perpendicular to the ground.  A ball in your hand is prevented from falling by your hand. After you throw the ball, gravity pulls it downward and gives the ball vertical motion.
  17. 17. Section Review p.43 #2-7, 9
  18. 18. Warmup If you are sitting still in your seat on a bus that is traveling 100 km/h on a highway, is your body at rest or in motion? Explain your answer. Use a diagram if it will help make your answer clear.
  19. 19. Section 2: Newton’s Laws of Motion By the end of this section, you should be able to:  Describe Newton’s first law of motion, and explain how it relates to objects at rest and objects in motion.  State Newton’s second law of motion, and explain the relationship between force, mass, and acceleration.  State Newton’s third law of motion, and give examples of force pairs.
  20. 20. Newton’s First Law of Motion  An object at rest remains at rest, and an object in motion remains in motion at a constant speed and in a straight line unless acted on by an unbalanced force.  Newton’s first law of motion describes the motion of an object that has a net force of 0 N acting on it.
  21. 21. Newton’s First Law of Motion  Part 1: Objects at rest will stay at rest unless they are acted on by an unbalanced force.
  22. 22. Newton’s First Law of Motion  Part 2: Objects will continue to move with the same velocity unless an unbalanced force acts on them.  Friction between an object and the surface it is moving over is an example of an unbalanced force that stops motion.
  23. 23. Newton’s First Law of Motion  Newton’s first law is sometimes called the law of inertia. Inertia is the tendency of all objects to resist any change in motion.  Mass is a measure of inertia. An object that has a small mass has less inertia than an object that has a large mass.
  24. 24. Newton’s First Law of Motion  So, changing the motion of an object that has a small mass is easier than changing the motion of an object that has a large mass.
  25. 25. Newton’s Second Law of Motion  The acceleration of an object depends on the mass of the object and the amount of force applied.  Newton’s second law describes the motion of an object when an unbalanced force acts on the object.
  26. 26. Newton’s Second Law of Motion  Part 1: The acceleration of an object decreases as its mass increases. Its acceleration increases as its mass decreases.  Part 2: An object’s acceleration increases as the force on the object increases. The acceleration of an object is always in the same direction as the force applied.
  27. 27. Newton’s Second Law of Motion
  28. 28. Newton’s Second Law of Motion 
  29. 29. Newton’s Third Law of Motion  Whenever one object exerts a force on a second object, the second object exerts an equal and opposite force on the first.  Newton’s third law of motion can be simply stated as follows: All forces act in pairs.
  30. 30. Newton’s Third Law of Motion  A force is always exerted by one object on another object. This rule is true for all forces, including action and reaction forces.
  31. 31. Newton’s Third Law of Motion  Action and reaction forces in a pair do not act on the same object. If they did, the net force would always be 0 N and nothing would ever move!
  32. 32. Newton’s Third Law of Motion  Newton’s third law says that all forces act in pairs. When a force is exerted, there is always a reaction force.
  33. 33. Newton’s Third Law of Motion  When an object falls, gravity pulls the object toward Earth and pulls Earth toward the object.  You don’t notice Earth being pulled upward because the mass of Earth is much larger than the mass of the object. Thus, the acceleration of Earth is much smaller than the acceleration of the object.
  34. 34. Section Review p.51 #2-6, 8
  35. 35. Warmup Make a list of 5 things you think have momentum and 5 things you think don’t have momentum.
  36. 36. Section 3: Momentum By the end of this section, you should be able to:  Calculate the momentum of moving objects.  Explain the law of conservation of momentum.
  37. 37. Momentum, Mass, and Velocity  The momentum of an object depends on the object’s mass and velocity.
  38. 38. Calculating Momentum 
  39. 39. Calculating Momentum
  40. 40. The Law of Conservation of Momentum  The law of conservation of momentum states that any time objects collide, the total amount of momentum stays the same.  After two objects stick together, they move as one object. The mass of the combined objects is equal to the masses of the two objects added together.
  41. 41. The Law of Conservation of Momentum  The combined objects have a different velocity because momentum is conserved and depends on mass and velocity.  So, when the mass changes, the velocity must change, too.
  42. 42. The Law of Conservation of Momentum  When two objects bounce off each other, momentum is usually transferred from one object to the other.  The transfer of momentum causes the objects to move in different directions at different speeds.
  43. 43. The Law of Conservation of Momentum  Conservation of momentum can be explained by Newton’s third law.  Because action and reaction forces are equal and opposite, momentum is neither gained or lost in a collision.
  44. 44. Section Review p.55 #2-7
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