Convert ppt to effective e learning
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Convert ppt to effective e learning

on

  • 562 views

Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular tool for creating training content. It’s easy to use and allows for just-in-time learning by allowing your content experts to author their own content. With ...

Microsoft PowerPoint is a popular tool for creating training content. It’s easy to use and allows for just-in-time learning by allowing your content experts to author their own content. With software tools such as Articulate and Brainshark, PowerPoint can be converted to an e-learning format very quickly.
In order to create effective e-learning, it’s important to provide guidelines for designing PowerPoint presentations that can be converted to effective e-learning courses. By providing an authoring guild, you are providing writing and instructional guidance for your subject matter experts.
Coupled with a presentation design template and style guide, these guides provide structure for the presentations as well as create standards for consistent e-learning.
This presentation details how an authoring guide coupled with a style guide and PowerPoint design template has allowed Textron the ability to utilize content SMEs as part of the development team for training.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
562
Views on SlideShare
536
Embed Views
26

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

2 Embeds 26

http://www.linkedin.com 23
http://fusedtalent.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Convert ppt to effective e learning Convert ppt to effective e learning Document Transcript

  • www.eLearningGuild.comConvert PowerPointTraining to Effective e-Learning through Authoring Guide Maria Leggett, Textron Inc. 811
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Convert to Effective e- Learning through Authoring Guide Maria Leggett Company Confidential 1 Discussion Why Use PowerPoint for eLearning Development? 2 Why Use PowerPoint? • Software tool that almost everyone has • Easy to use; short learning curve • Works well in specific business environments and conditions • Shorter development times • Many companies already have content in some kind of PowerPoint presentation • Novice ID and SMEs can help in conversion with the latest PowerPoint to e-Learning tools. 3Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 1through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Discussion Why doesn’t PowerPoint work well when converted to e-Learning? 4 Possible Reasons • Too much text on the slide – little interaction – eReading! • Formatting doesn’t work for e-Learning – Colors – Backgrounds – Graphics – Text • Different layouts within PowerPoint presentation – no consistency! 5 Bottom Line PowerPoint is an easy and convenient tool for live presentations. It was NOT intended to be a tool for building courses. 6Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 2through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL The Good, the Bad, & the UGLY The Good, the Bad & the UGLY 7 Example 1 8 Example 2 9Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 3through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Example 3 10 Example 4 11 Example 5 12Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 4through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Example 6 13 Discussion What should be standardized in order to expedite development and create effective training? 14 Demo 1: Authoring Guide • Provide writing and instructional guidance for your subject matter experts. • Helps establish standards in writing style and grammar – especially key when multiple SMEs are involved in a development project. • Useful for learning and development group to maintain standards and consistency. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-A.doc 15Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 5through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Interactivity • Engage your participants – include activities and interactions at least every 4 to 5 slides. • Use scenarios or stories to evoke emotion with your participants and help them relate the content to their own experiences. 16 Demo 2: PowerPoint Design Template • Establish set font, colors, and layout for the presentation. • Can be used to guide SMEs with the instructional design of their content. • Place prompts in the presentation for objectives, step- by-step examples, scenarios/stories and questions. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-B.ppt 17 Color Gradient Settings Click the Paint Bucket >Choose Fill Effects 18Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 6through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Align Graphics on the Slide • Turn off the snap to option under Grid and Guides on the Draw menu. • Use the TAB key to cycle through the objects on the slide to select the desired object. 19 Ordering Objects • Use the Order menu on the Draw menu to move items to the front or back. • Use the Align or Distribute menu to align objects. TIP! Click one item and hold the SHIFT key and to select other objects to align multiple objects. 20 Demo 3: Design Guide • Provide instructions for SMEs for using the PowerPoint template. • Guide is a take-away and reference document for SMEs and other users. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-C.doc 21Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 7through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Demo 4: Photoshop Graphic Template • Provide a consistent look and feel for graphics. • Quickly create graphics and build a graphics library using layers in Photoshop. • Reuse graphics for other projects. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-D.psd 22 Graphics • Avoid clipart • Use good stock photos – www.photos.com – www.istockphotos.com – www.corbis.com – www.jupiterimages.com • Avoid sensory overload with too many graphics, animations or transitions. 23 Demo 5: Audio Guide • Help SMEs and other voice over talent use effective techniques for recording audio. • Use audio scripts. • Slide text should reinforce the audio narration not repeat it. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-E.doc 24Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 8through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • April 14-17, 2008 Orlando, FL Demo 6: Wrap-Up Checklist • Confirm that SMEs have used proper steps to develop, design content. • Verify that items haven’t been missed or skipped. • Provide sign-off by the SME for the content. Handout: AGC08-811-Leggett-F.doc 25 Contact Information Maria Leggett mleggett@textron.com 26Session 811 – Convert PowerPoint Training to Effective e-Learning Page 9through Authoring Guide – Maria Leggett, Textron Inc.
  • Authoring Guide 1
  • Table of ContentsIntroduction ....................................................................................................3Writing Style ...................................................................................................3 Abbreviations................................................................................................3 Acronyms .....................................................................................................3 Apostrophe...................................................................................................4 Capitalization ................................................................................................4 Colon ...........................................................................................................5 Grammar/Usage............................................................................................6 Lowercase Words ..........................................................................................7 Terminology .................................................................................................7 Use of Numbers ............................................................................................8 Bold Text......................................................................................................8 Italic Text.....................................................................................................8 Punctuation ..................................................................................................8 Commas....................................................................................................9 Apostrophes...............................................................................................9 Bulleted Lists .............................................................................................9 Objectives .................................................................................................9 Spelling......................................................................................................10 Online Resources.........................................................................................11Instructional Strategies...................................................................................12 Writing Learning Objectives ..........................................................................12 MEASURABLE ACTION VERBS .......................................................................13 KNOWLEDGE ..............................................................................................13 ACTION ...................................................................................................13 ATTITUDE ................................................................................................13 ANALYSIS ................................................................................................13 Stimulate Recall ..........................................................................................14 Maximizing Understanding and Retention .......................................................14 Ways to Make Learning Visual .......................................................................14 Building Interest in the Training ....................................................................14 Writing Strategies........................................................................................15 2
  • IntroductionThis guide covers both writing and instructional strategies for developing yourcontent.In writing text for presentations, it is important to keep it short. Avoid excessivetext by using short sentences and keeping content relative to the topic. This willhelp keep your students’ interest throughout the course.To ensure that the writing helps instead of hinders students, practice the KISSformula. Keep It Simple and Straightforward.Designing a successful online course is more than a simple conversion of materials toa Web-ready format. It requires a set of structures, technique, and methods that willensure a smooth process of development and delivery. This guide will provide youwith effective instructional methods to utilize in both in constructing your coursecontent.Writing Style Keep it simple. Avoid run-on sentences. When your sentence starts to get long and confusing, consider creating a new sentence. Avoid dense paragraphs. Use bulleted lists, charts, tables, and illustrations where appropriate. Use the present tense – it keeps things shorter. Address the user. Use personal pronouns – for example, “you”.AbbreviationsAn abbreviation is a shortened form of a word. Generally, avoid abbreviations in technical writing. Define an abbreviation in its first use. Do not abbreviate the names of states unless used with zip codes in addresses. Write out Latin abbreviations in text. Refer to the following table:Instead of… Use…e.g. For examplei.e. That isAcronymsAn acronym consists of the initial letters of a name or a series of words. In using acronyms, define the full word the first time used, followed by the acronym in parenthesis. After initial introduction of the full definition, the 3
  • acronym can be used instead. Example: Textron Six Sigma (TSS). Once introduced, the acronym may be used alone. Capitalize the first letter of each word used in an acronym. Note: For Textron Six Sigma modules, each module is considered a stand- alone unit of training. Therefore, terminology should be introduced in the full word (acronym) standard for every module. Using the articles “a” or “an” before an acronym depends on its pronunciation. If the initial sound is a vowel sound, use “an”; if a consonant sound, use “a.” Do not use apostrophes to indicate plurals with acronyms. Do not use periods in acronyms. Example: PCs not PC’s or P.C.sApostropheUse an apostrophe to indicate possession. Although an apostrophe is also used to indicate a contraction (for example, don’t), avoid using contractions in formal writing. “It’s” is only used to indicate a contraction of it is. “Its” is the proper way to indicate possession.CapitalizationUse capitalization consistently and in accordance with your intended meaning.Capitalizing a word can often change the meaning of the word especially in technicalwriting where capitalizing a word can denote a specific system feature orfunctionality. Use all caps only for acronyms. Example: GRIS, GDSCapitalize the first letter of the following: The first word in a sentence Each principle word in a title or heading Screen/field names Names of job aids, study guides, references Bulleted list items The words Building, Room, Figure, Table or similar words when used with a number. 4
  • Proper nouns, such as names of people, places and things Trade names and manufacturers’ names Each word in an official job department or organizational unit name Names of nationalities and languages Points of the compass when referring to a region Each word in official job titles and functional titles if used immediately before a person’s name. E.g. Textron Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Lewis B. Campbell Note: Short articles, conjunctions, and prepositions are not principal words in titles and should be lowercase.after as for into or underamong at from of over withan but if on thanand by in onto the Capitalize the first letter of longer prepositions, such as between, during and without.ColonUse a colon to indicate a series in a sentence. Place a single space after the colonand before the beginning of a series.Example: The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology consists of five phases: Define,Measure, Analyze, Improve and control.Use a colon at the end of a complete introductory sentence preceding a list. Becareful to avoid placing a colon after a verb.Avoid: The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology includes: Define Measure Analyze Improve ControlDo not use a colon to separate a preposition and its object or a verb and its object asseen in the incorrect example above.Correct: The Six Sigma DMAIC methodology includes the following: Define Measure Analyze Improve Control 5
  • Grammar/UsageWhen you have two independent clauses (i.e., two subjects and two verbs) considerthese two options. Separate them by a coordinating conjunction. Example: Learners may choose to take lessons in any order, or they can mix them up. Create two sentences. Example: Learners may choose to take lessons in order. They can also mix them up.Use present tense where possible. Avoid future tense. Do: When you click the icon, the window displays. Avoid: When you click the icon, the window will display. Do: We use Global Data Standards. Avoid: We will use Global Data Standards.Use active verbs (e.g., "request") instead of passive verbs (e.g., "are requested"). Use the "who does it" test. If the user doesnt do it (implied "you"), then say who does. Do: BPCS validates the item number and enters the item description. Avoid: The item number is validated and the description is entered.Make sure a possessive pronoun or subject agrees with its antecedent. Do: The user (sing.) reads his/her (sing.) email. Do: Users (plural) read their (plural) email. Avoid: The user (sing.) reads their (plural) email.Don’t confuse its (possessive pronoun) and it’s (contraction for “it is”). Example: Its a shame that the chick fell out of its nest.Use parallel structure, especially in bulleted lists. Example: This lesson teaches you about: Using icons Displaying lists Entering data Avoid: This lesson teaches you about: Icon usage Displaying lists Data entry 6
  • Lowercase WordsUse lowercase for the following: Unofficial job titles in text Incomplete or unofficial names of documents or forms Generic system or hardware names in technical writing Chemical element names Examples: word processing program; I saw the president.TerminologyBe consistent in the use of terminology. Avoid jargon and slang whenever possible. When special terms or abbreviations are used, identify their meaning at first usage. Always use “Textron University”. Do not abbreviate Textron University as TU, TXTU or Textron U. Avoid hyphenating words like “online,” and “pulldown” when used as adjectives. Examples: online tutorial, pulldown menu NOTE: Textron does not have a standard for e-learning but this spelling is the most common. Watch for these confusing abbreviations: "e.g.," ("for example") and "i.e.," ("in other words"). Example: In case of a hurricane, clear the decks (i.e., go to your room). When the weather is agreeable, there are activities for everyone (e.g., swimming, bowling, shuffle board). Use the following terminology related to the training: Use appropriate media references: (e.g., CBT, Instructor-led Online Help, WBT) Use nouns for lesson and module titles. Example: Value Stream Mapping or Process Maps Refer to the audience in a general context as students (not learners). When referring to the readers, use you. 7
  • Use of NumbersWrite out numbers as words in the text when numbers are less than 10. Example: Two hunters stayed in the forest while the other 10 crossed the savanna.Hyphenate numbers above 10 if you need to spell them out. Do not use commas toseparate words that are part of one number. Example: Forty-seven, eight-one, ninety-nine Example: Two thousand three hundred four-six (i.e. 2,346)Always spell out a number if it begins a sentence. Example: Thirty-three people ate dinner.Bold TextUse bold face type for: Headings for topics Headings for tables Headings (captions) on graphics Any important item that needs to be emphasizedAvoid overusing bold type. If you use bold too frequently, the phrases in bold willcompete with one another for the student’s attention. They’ll end up payingattention to nothing.Italic TextOnly use italic in these instances: To indicate the titles of published works, such as books, albums, TV shows and movies. NOTE: Use quotation marks for periodical articles or reference materials. To indicate words from other languages that have not been incorporated into EnglishNOTE: Bold is better than italic to catch the reader’s attention. Research has shownthat italic type is actually harder to read than regular type. The text may becomelost on the page.PunctuationApply the following standards in your use of punctuation. 8
  • CommasUse commas to separate items in a series. A comma should not be used before theconjunction “and/or”, unless additional conjunctions are needed. Example: “We love turnips, endive and tomatoes.” Example: “We love turnips and tomatoes, apples and pears, and cheddar and Swiss cheeses.”Use a comma before the conjunction in a series of phrases. Example: “We went to the mall to buy shoes, to the grocery to pick up steaks, and to the dry cleaner to pick up my suit.”Commas can be used before prepositions (e.g. “but”, “then” and “so”), but shouldnot appear after these words. Example: Then they rode through the palace gates, but that didn’t save them from the bandits.ApostrophesUse an apostrophe to indicate possession.Use just an “s” to indicate plurals of abbreviations. Do not use “’s”.Example: “User IDs” not “User IDs.”Use just an “s” to indicate years. Example: the 1970s, not 1970’s.DO: “music of the ‘60s”DON’T: “music of the ‘60’s”Bulleted ListsUse a bulleted list for a non-sequential list of items. (Use a numbered list for a listthat follows a definite sequence.) Use the following standards when creating bulletedlists. At the end of this lesson, you will be able to: Create a spaghetti diagram Explain the purpose of the fishboneUse punctuation at the end of a bulleted item, only when it is a complete sentence.Use parallel sentence structure.Avoid using commas or the words "or" or "and" at the end of bulleted items.Objectives Use parallel wording for objectives Use no more than five objectives (if possible – shorter is better) 9
  • SpellingAdvise, advice Advice (n.) - counsel, guidance Advise (v.) - to offer advice Example: I advise you to follow these standards. Her advice was strictly followed.Affect, effect Affect (v.) - to influence, to change Effect (v.) - to bring about, accomplish Effect (n.) - a result Example: The young hoped his plea would affect his teacher enough to effect a better grade on his report card, which could have a lasting effect on his ability to get into college.Complement, compliment Complement (n. or v.) – denotes completeness or the process of supplementing something Compliment (n. or v.) – denotes praise Example: The woman received many compliments on her hat, which complemented her dress.Although, while While implies time. Only use the word when you mean to imply a time sequence. Otherwise, use although. Example: “While students are working on their projects, they also should meet with their Black Belt Mentor.”Easy and other value words Avoid describing topics as simple, easy, or clear. Although these words may sound like they will pacify nervous readers, some readers may find the topics or activities difficult or unclear. Readers, who find something to be difficult, after being told it should be easy, are discouraged.Its, it’s Only use the apostrophe for the contraction of “it is”. For the possessive form of its, do not use an apostrophe.She, he, they To avoid sounding sexist, use the third person plural – use they instead of he or she. 10
  • User Use students instead of users.Since, because Since implies time. Only use the word when you mean to imply a time sequence. Otherwise, use because.Which, that “That” introduces information directly- related to the subject to complete a sentence or thought. “Which” introduces an additional thought or additional information that is not essential to the reader or the focus of the sentence. Example: “The book, which is known as the Six Sigma Bible, is a great resource.”Web Capitalize the W.Web site Web site should be written as two separate words with the S in site being lowercase.The Net Capitalize T and N - synonymous with the Internet.setup, set up One word if a noun, two words if used as verb.hard drive Spelled as two wordsOnline ResourcesOnline Citation Machinehttp://citationmachine-east.net/Enter in information and it will properly format your citation in either MLA or APA.Chicago Manual of Stylehttp://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/cmosfaq.htmlAssociate Press Style Referencehttp://www.utexas.edu/coc/journalism/SOURCE/journal_links/AP_style.html 11
  • Instructional StrategiesWriting Learning ObjectivesObjectives have two distinguishable elements: 1. Condition: Under what conditions do you want the learner to be able to do it? ”At the end of this lesson you will be able to…” The first element of the sentence clearly describes the circumstance under which the task will be performed. 2. Action: What should the learner be able to do? ”… compile lists of 20 types of tools …” The second element is where you want to focus because it tells the student what skills, knowledge, actions, and/or attitudes they will learn. You should always begin with an action verb that is as specific and observable as possible. When you start developing your objectives, you will have the tendency to use verbs such as “understand” or “learn”. These are vague verbs and you should never use them in your objectives. Instead, use action verbs that are measurable and specific. They will help an objective be stated clearly enough that two different instructors would be able to assess students using the same criteria and get the same results. Refer to the chart below for appropriate action verbs when writing your objectives. 12
  • Type MEASURABLE ACTION VERBSKNOWLEDGE • judge • adjust • recognize • categorizeThese verbs refer • analyze • calculate • report • orderto learninginformation (facts, • describe • interpret • assess • selectdefinitions,concepts, etc.) and • plan • name • relate • statedevelopingthinking and • label • explain • reviewlearning abilities. • apply • list • define • evaluate • predictACTION • measure • arrange • identify • moveThese verbs refer • perform • demonstrate • participate • selectto performing an • develop • illustrateactivity and • employ • adjustcarrying out • construct • practiceactions. They • sketchclearly describe the • apply • solveaction you want • repeatyour learners to • use • locateperform.ATTITUDE • agree • participate • offerThis objective • avoid • cooperate • joinrefers to thelearning of new • support • praise • helpattitudes or beliefs.ANALYSIS • examine • relate • classify • analyzeSeparates whole • debate • appraiseinto parts until • differentiate • calculaterelationships • criticize • testamong elements is • experiment • compareclear. • diagram • translate • distinguish • contrast • relate • question • interpret 13
  • Stimulate RecallBefore presenting new information to students, attempt to associate the materialwith prior knowledge that the students might have on the topic. Its easier forlearners to encode and store information in long-term memory when there are linksto personal experience and knowledge. Moreover, by identifying similarities anddifferences between existing knowledge and the knowledge to be-learned, studentsmore quickly grasp relevant information.A simple way to stimulate recall is to: Build upon an understanding of previously introduced concepts Use a lot of examples Use analogies or stories about your personal experiencesMaximizing Understanding and Retention Headlines. Reduce the major points in the training material to key words that act as verbal subheadings, bullet points, or memory aids. Examples and analogies. Provide real-life illustrations of the ideas in the lecture and, if possible, create a comparison between your material and the knowledge and experience that the students already have. Visual backup. Use charts, brief handouts, and demonstrations that enable students to see as well as hear what you are saying.Ways to Make Learning Visual Diagrams, charts, maps, or pictures Stories Demonstration Examples or real work or eventsBuilding Interest in the Training Lead-off story or interesting visual. Provide a relevant anecdote, story, cartoon, quotation, or graphic that captures the audience’s attention. Initial case problem. Present a problem around which the training will be structured. Illuminating activities. Throughout the presentation, intersperse brief activities that illuminate the points you are making. Student review. Review the contents of the material periodically through the training such as giving students a self-scoring review test. Test question. Ask a question so students will begin to think about the topic and will be motivated to listen. 14
  • Writing Strategies 1. Audience Make sure that your content focuses on and addresses the appropriate audience. To be effective, text must be written with the audience in mind and language must address the appropriate audience. 2. Objective When you write the content for each topic, you should always make sure that the content reflects and is clearly related to the specific objective. You should consider including only information that will enable the students to accomplish the objective. 3. Length Always present the content in small chunks. It is much easier for students to incrementally complete content that is divided into small chunks. Additionally, write short sentences with simple wording that get to the point. 4. Variety Provide a variety of formats keeps the students interested, helps clarify the presented material, and is the best predictor for students’ success. 15
  • PowerPoint Design TemplateThe Design Guide consists of a PowerPoint template file called AGC08-811-Leggett-B.pptThis template has been designed to quickly begin creating presentationmaterials for courses in PowerPoint using the company colorscheme and graphic templates.Template DesignThe AGC08-811-Leggett-B.ppt contains the course template slides. ThisPowerPoint presentation provides the structure and graphics for building instructionalpresentation course materials. Use the slides and graphics as needed and delete therest. Replace the text and graphic placeholders with your content.ColorsThe colors in the PPT template are the company primary colors as well as secondarycomplementary colors.Secondary Colors Primary Colors 1
  • Gradient Fill Options To add depth to an object, use the gradient settings. Select the Paint Bucket on the Drawing toolbar and choose Fill Effects.Fonts The font family for the presentation is Verdana. Title: Size 32 bold Subtitle: Size 24 bold Bullet 1: Size 22 bold Sub-Bullet 1: Size 20 bold Sub-Bullet 2: Size 18 boldTemplate OrganizationThe slides in the template are grouped by function. The first set of slides is theinstructional design templates that should be used for every course. For graphicsand visuals, the table and chart section has examples of different charts and tablesthat can be used to visually display information. When highlighting specific detailsor concepts, the information box templates can be used to create call out importantinformation. 2
  • Instructional Design Templates Course Title The course title slide identifies the course. Replace the title placeholder with the official name of the course. The course subtitle placeholder is used to elaborate on the title. The subtitle should not be more than 3 lines. Course Objectives The course objectives slide tells learners in detail what will be covered during this course and what they will learn. Objectives should be written as SMART objectives beginning with action verbs. -------------------------------------- By the end of this course you will be able to: Describe the different business units in order to explain their impact to the Enterprise 3
  • Topic titleIf the course covers severaltopics, the title slide can be usedto mark the start of a section withthe topic title.Keep the topic title short and usea subtitle if need to elaborate onthe title.Note: If the actual content of thetopic is only a few slides, a topictitle slide may not be necessary.QuoteUse the quote slide to include anyquote that relate to the coursematerial. Include the speakerand date if available.Quotes are a great way togenerate discussion around thetopic.Question and Answer SlidesQuestions are another way togenerate discussion and getstudents thinking about a topic orconcept. The answer slide can bedisplayed after the question slideor be available in the Appendix soas not to easily give away theanswer. 4
  • Checklist TemplateUse this template when you havea list of items to cover. Each itemcomes in one at a time with theanimation scheme and can be setto timed sequence or mouseadvance.Tool/Concept IntroductionThis introduction slide is used togive a high-level overview of aparticular tool or concept that isimportant to the topic and issomething students mustremember.Use the important box to highlightparticular information about thetool or concept.Include a relevant graphic tovisually show learners what thetool/concept looks like. The visualis further detailed out in theTool/Concept Overview slide. 5
  • Tool/Concept OverviewThe tool overview slide is used inconjunction with the toolintroduction slide to visuallydemonstrate steps or features ofthe tool/concept.Provide a graphic of thetool/concept with a drop-shadowbackground and use the blueinformation boxes and arrows topoint and specific features.Use the light blue box with blueborder to highlight an area.Use the blue text box to providedetail information and the arrowto point out the specific area.Animation details are provided onthe slide template.Scenario/ExampleThis slide is used to detail ascenario or example. This slidecomplements the tool/conceptintroduction and overview slidesas an on-the-job example of atool or concept to illustrate itsuse.Include relevant graphics tovisualize the scenario/example. 6
  • Step Template 1This template is used to outlinesteps for a tool, process, orconcept. This is a high-leveloverview of the steps. In-depthdetail of each step is to beprovided in the individual stepslides.Step Template 2This step template is for stepsummaries that are shorter inlength. 7
  • Activity TemplateThis template slide is for classactivities. Specify instructionsand time allotted for the activity.If there are additional filesrequired, specify those in the bluebox at the bottom. Delete thisbox if no additional files arerequired.Tips and Lessons LearnedUse this slide to summarize anytips, lesson learned or pitfallsrelating to the course topic.Summary SlideSummarize the module objectivesagain to recap the course materialand review. 8
  • ResourcesUse the resource slide to providelearners with additionalinformation to continue learningabout the course topic.Additional items to consider forresources: Job-aids Discussion forums Blogs Knowledge bases WebinarsTo insert hyperlinks to Web sites: 1. Select the text you want as a link. 2. Select Insert > Hyperlink 3. Enter the Web address in field. (Be sure to include the complete address starting with http://) 4. Click OK. 9
  • Graphic TemplatesThe following templates are graphic templates to visually present information. Tables and Graphs 10
  • 11
  • Information Boxes 12
  • Arrows and Lines 13
  • Information Flow 14
  • AnimationsSeveral slides and graphic have animations with them. These animations are set toeither a timed sequenced or can be advanced with the mouse. In order to keep theconsistency within the template and not to overwhelm people with many animationschemes, keep the animation styles to a minimum. Within this presentation, theanimation styles are: Dissolve Fade in Faded zoom Boxed in Wipe CircleTypically text and information boxes use the dissolve animation style. Forinformation call-out boxes and arrows, the boxed in and wipe styles are used. Whenpointing out a specific area within a graphic such as a section of a survey, use thefaded zoom. 15
  • Audio Recording Best PracticesAudio Script 1. Write a slide-by-slide script for the presentation. You have to deliver audio that is polished and engaging in order to keep the attention of the audience. 2. Practice the script aloud. 3. Have someone listen to the recorded presentation or read the script aloud to a colleague and have them provide feedback.Presenting Lists or Chunks of Information 1. When possible, announce what you are going to talk about before you talk about it. For example, “Now let’s take a closer look at the manufacturing industry.” 2. When possible, if about to list a number of items, announce first. For example, “There are three basic tools. They are: x, y, and z.” 3. If you are going to detail a list, first name them (see above). Then in next sentence, go into more detail. 4. Pause before each bullet, when listing things. 5. Begin a list by saying how many items is part of the list. When you get to the last one, it is helpful to say “and the final item...” For example, “the accounting equation consists of three variables. The first variable is assets. The second variable is the liabilities. The final of the three variables in the accounting equation is stockholders’ equity.” 6. Try to keep lists to five items or less.Transitions and Summaries 1. Introduce a slide with a transition from previous section/slide For example. “So far we have discussed the basic tools of Six Sigma. Now let’s look at the Cause & Effect Diagram in more detail.” 2. Keep audio about 1-2 minutes per slide. 3. If you are mentioning a topic in brief that you will go into more detail later in the topic overview, mention that fact. For example, “we will go into more detail about the Value Stream Map later in this lesson. For now let’s focus on the value streams.”Pace, Tone and Phrasing 1. Speak slowly and clearly. 2. Pause at the end of each sentence. 3. If possible, stand. Your voice will carry further. 4. Smile while talking. You will sound friendlier. 5. Keep sentences shorter than you would in an personal face-to-face speaking situation. Long sentences are harder to follow than short. 6. When possible, avoid contractions, (such as don’t couldn’t, I’m) – harder to understand in audio clip than “do not, could not, I am.” 7. In your script, bold key words that you would naturally stress while speaking. For example, “There are three basic tools.” 8. At the end of each clip, maintain your tone of voice, as opposed to your voice dropping off or getting quiet. 9. Vary your tone of voice/intonation to impact your audience’s understanding of the material and to make an emotional connection. 10. Good presentation audio is created by communicating energy, enthusiasm and knowledge of the content.
  • Audio Recording GuideAudio Script 1. Write a slide-by-slide script for the presentation. You have to deliver audio that is polished and engaging in order to keep the attention of the audience. 2. Practice the script aloud. 3. Have someone listen to the recorded presentation or read the script aloud to a colleague and have them provide feedback.Presenting Lists or Chunks of Information 1. When possible, announce what you are going to talk about before you talk about it. For example, “Now let’s take a closer look at the manufacturing industry.” 2. When possible, if about to list a number of items, announce first. For example, “There are three basic tools. They are: x, y, and z.” 3. If you are going to detail a list, first name them (see above). Then in next sentence, go into more detail. 4. Pause before each bullet, when listing things. 5. Begin a list by saying how many items is part of the list. When you get to the last one, it is helpful to say “and the final item...” For example, “the accounting equation consists of three variables. The first variable is assets. The second variable is the liabilities. The final of the three variables in the accounting equation is stockholders’ equity.” 6. Try to keep lists to five items or less.Transitions and Summaries 1. Introduce a slide with a transition from previous section/slide For example. “So far we have discussed the basic tools of Six Sigma. Now let’s look at the Cause & Effect Diagram in more detail.” 2. Keep audio about 1-2 minutes per slide. 3. If you are mentioning a topic in brief that you will go into more detail later in the topic overview, mention that fact. For example, “we will go into more detail about the Value Stream Map later in this lesson. For now let’s focus on the value streams.”Pace, Tone and Phrasing 1. Speak slowly and clearly. 2. Pause at the end of each sentence. 3. If possible, stand. Your voice will carry further. 4. Smile while talking. You will sound friendlier. 5. Keep sentences shorter than you would in an personal face-to-face speaking situation. Long sentences are harder to follow than short. 6. When possible, avoid contractions, (such as don’t couldn’t, I’m) – harder to understand in audio clip than “do not, could not, I am.” 7. In your script, bold key words that you would naturally stress while speaking. For example, “There are three basic tools.” 8. At the end of each clip, maintain your tone of voice, as opposed to your voice dropping off or getting quiet. 9. Vary your tone of voice/intonation to impact your audience’s understanding of the material and to make an emotional connection. 10. Good presentation audio is created by communicating energy, enthusiasm and knowledge of the content.
  • Wrap-Up ChecklistThe LessonDoes the lesson grab students and make them want to continue through the course? Y NIs each lesson concise, focused, and well organized? Y NAre the objectives of each lesson clearly stated? Y NDoes the lesson include a self-assessment quiz or assignment to help reinforce whatstudents learn in the lesson? Y NAre paragraphs succinct, limited to a few sentences? Y NAre graphics used for ideas that are best expressed visually? Y NIs the content written at the learner’s language level? Y NDo the graphics enhance, not detract from, the content? Y NObjectivesDo all objectives for the course have assessment procedures? Y NDo all assessments procedures relate to specific objectives? Y NHas mastery for each objective been defined? Y NQuiz QuestionsAre the quiz questions clear and not ambiguous? Y NAre the quiz questions grammatically correct? Y NIs there a correct answer provided for each quiz question? Y NHas ambiguity in the quiz question been avoided? Y NDo all quiz questions relate to specific objectives? Y N
  • Module CorrectionsPlease list slide numbers and corrections to be made in the table below.Slide # Change Description