Ovid’s MetamorphosesDaphne and Apollo
DAY ONE
Introduction to Ovid and Apollo
Passage #1
Publius Ovidius Naso
Wrote during the Augustan Age
Some scholars consider his
works to be subversive (secretly
critical) t...
Apollo
• Son of Zeus and Leto
• God of music and poetry (plays the lyre)
• God of healing and purification
• God of prophe...
Apollo and Daphne Myth Preview
After defeating Python (a great snake), prideful Apollo encounters
Cupid holding his own bo...
dixit et eliso percussis aere pennis
impiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce
eque sagittifera prompsit duo tela pharetra
di...
di-xit et e-li-so per-cus-sis a-e-re pen-nis
im-pi-ger um-bro-sa Par-na-si con-sti-tit ar-ce
e-que sa-git-ti-fe-ra promp-s...
dixit et ēlīsō percūssīs äere pennīs
impiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce
eque sagittiferā prompsit duo tēla pharetrā
di...
Adapted Passage #1 (466-474)
Amor dīxit et, fractō aere percussīs pennīs,
impiger umbrōsā arce Parnāsī cōnstitit
duoque tē...
Modern Equivalents to
Cupid’s Arrows
What do you think about
Apollo, a god of healing and
prophecy, being struck by
Cupid’s arrow?
What do you think will happe...
DAY TWO
Augustus’ Apollo and Ovid’s Apollo
Passage #2
Apollo in the Augustan Age
Augustus associated Apollo
iconography with his own
promotion and image
He connected the Palati...
Apollo in the Augustan Age Cont.
Adopted title “Actian Apollo” for the god after victory against
Antony
Presented Apollo a...
How do you think Augustus
would have wanted Apollo
portrayed?
Discussion Question #2
Original Passage #2
(1.504-511)
'nympha, precor, Penei, mane! non insequor hostis;
nympha, mane! sic agna lupum, sic cerva...
Figures of Speech?
'nympha, precor, Pēnēi, manē! non insequor hostis;
nympha, mane! sīc agna lupum, sīc cerva leonem, 505
...
Original Passage #2
Cont.(1.512-518)
cui placeas, inquire tamen: non incola montis,
non ego sum pastor, non hic armenta gr...
Figures of Speech?
cui placeas, inquire tamen: nōn incola montis,
nōn ego sum pastor, nōn hīc armenta gregēsque
horridus o...
Adapted Passage #2 (ll. 504-509)
'nympha, precor, Pēnēi, manē! nōn īnsequor hostis; nympha,
manē!
sīcut agna lupum fugit, ...
Adapted Passage # 2 Cont. (ll.510-
518)aspera sunt loca, in quibus properās: curre moderātius, [510]
precor, inhibē fugam,...
How the Myth Ends
• Daphne calls upon her father to
save her and he transforms her
into a laurel tree
• Apollo reaches the...
What sort of pursuit is Apollo making in Ovid’s
story?
One for hunt, love, victory?
All of the above?
Discussion Question ...
DAY THREE
Shakespearean Comparison
Shakespearean
Comparison Introduction
In this passage (scene ii, act II) from Shakespeare’s A
Midsummer Night’s Dream, Dem...
Midsummer Night’s Dream Comparison
Helena, about her love for Demetrius, says:
“O that my prayers could such affection mov...
BibliographyLaFleur, Richard A. Love and Transformation: An Ovid Reader. Glenview: Scott
Foresman/Addison Wesley, 1999.
Sh...
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Mariah's ovid final project

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Ovid Adapted Passage final project

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Mariah's ovid final project

  1. 1. Ovid’s MetamorphosesDaphne and Apollo
  2. 2. DAY ONE Introduction to Ovid and Apollo Passage #1
  3. 3. Publius Ovidius Naso Wrote during the Augustan Age Some scholars consider his works to be subversive (secretly critical) towards Augustus Ovid writes transformation myths in his Metamorphoses
  4. 4. Apollo • Son of Zeus and Leto • God of music and poetry (plays the lyre) • God of healing and purification • God of prophecy
  5. 5. Apollo and Daphne Myth Preview After defeating Python (a great snake), prideful Apollo encounters Cupid holding his own bow and arrows Apollo tells Cupid such weapons are meant for him (Apollo), a great victor in battle Cupid retorts that he has greater glory and his own skills (with the bow) are powerful enough to defeat even Apollo
  6. 6. dixit et eliso percussis aere pennis impiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce eque sagittifera prompsit duo tela pharetra diversorum operum: fugat hoc, facit illud amorem; quod facit, auratum est et cuspide fulget acuta, 470 quod fugat, obtusum est et habet sub harundine plumbum. hoc deus in nympha Peneide fixit, at illo laesit Apollineas traiecta per ossa medullas; protinus alter amat, fugit altera nomen amantis Original Passage #1 (466- 474)
  7. 7. di-xit et e-li-so per-cus-sis a-e-re pen-nis im-pi-ger um-bro-sa Par-na-si con-sti-tit ar-ce e-que sa-git-ti-fe-ra promp-sit du-o te-la pha-re-tra di-ver-sor-u(m) op-e-rum: fu-gat hoc, fa-cit ill-ud am-o-rem; quod fa-cit, au-ra-tu(m) est et cus-pi-de ful-get a-cu-ta -Heavy syllables are blue and light are pink -Brown is anceps (free syllable at the end of a line which can be either long or short) Scansion Review
  8. 8. dixit et ēlīsō percūssīs äere pennīs impiger umbrosa Parnasi constitit arce eque sagittiferā prompsit duo tēla pharetrā diversorum operum: fugat hoc, facit illud amorem; quod facit, auratum est et cuspide fulget acuta, 470 quod fugat, obtusum est et habet sub harundine plumbum. hoc deus in nympha Peneide fixit, at illo laesit Apollineās traiecta per ossa medullās; protinus alter amat, fugit altera nomen amantis Figures of Speech
  9. 9. Adapted Passage #1 (466-474) Amor dīxit et, fractō aere percussīs pennīs, impiger umbrōsā arce Parnāsī cōnstitit duoque tēla dīversōrum operum ē sagittiferā pharetrā prōmpsit: hoc tēlum fugat, illud tēlum amōrem facit; illud quod amōrem facit, aurātum et acūtum est, [470] hoc quod fugat, obtūsum et plumbātum est Amor hoc tēlum in nymphā Penēide fixit, et illud telum Phoebum laesit; sūbitō Phoebus amat, Daphne nōmen amantis fugit
  10. 10. Modern Equivalents to Cupid’s Arrows
  11. 11. What do you think about Apollo, a god of healing and prophecy, being struck by Cupid’s arrow? What do you think will happen next? Discussion Question #1
  12. 12. DAY TWO Augustus’ Apollo and Ovid’s Apollo Passage #2
  13. 13. Apollo in the Augustan Age Augustus associated Apollo iconography with his own promotion and image He connected the Palatine Temple of Apollo (dedicated in 28 BCE) to his own Palatine home He placed laurel (the tree of Apollo) on his door and wore it in his own hair
  14. 14. Apollo in the Augustan Age Cont. Adopted title “Actian Apollo” for the god after victory against Antony Presented Apollo as avenger and warlike
  15. 15. How do you think Augustus would have wanted Apollo portrayed? Discussion Question #2
  16. 16. Original Passage #2 (1.504-511) 'nympha, precor, Penei, mane! non insequor hostis; nympha, mane! sic agna lupum, sic cerva leonem, 505 sic aquilam penna fugiunt trepidante columbae, hostes quaeque suos: amor est mihi causa sequendi! me miserum! ne prona cadas indignave laedi crura notent sentes et sim tibi causa doloris! aspera, qua properas, loca sunt: moderatius, oro, 510 curre fugamque inhibe, moderatius insequar ipse.
  17. 17. Figures of Speech? 'nympha, precor, Pēnēi, manē! non insequor hostis; nympha, mane! sīc agna lupum, sīc cerva leonem, 505 sīc aquilam penna fugiunt trepidante columbae, hostes quaeque suos: amor est mihi causa sequendi! me miserum! ne prona cadas indignave laedi crura notent sentes et sim tibi causa doloris! aspera, qua properas, loca sunt: moderatius, oro, 510 curre fugamque inhibe, moderatius insequar ipse.
  18. 18. Original Passage #2 Cont.(1.512-518) cui placeas, inquire tamen: non incola montis, non ego sum pastor, non hic armenta gregesque horridus observo. nescis, temeraria, nescis, quem fugias, ideoque fugis: mihi Delphica tellus 515 et Claros et Tenedos Patareaque regia servit; Iuppiter est genitor; per me, quod eritque fuitque estque, patet; per me concordant carmina nervis.
  19. 19. Figures of Speech? cui placeas, inquire tamen: nōn incola montis, nōn ego sum pastor, nōn hīc armenta gregēsque horridus observō. nescis, temeraria, nescis, quem fugias, ideoque fugis: mihi Delphica tellus 515 et Claros et Tenedos Patareaque regia servit; Iuppiter est genitor; per mē, quod eritque fuitque estque, patet; per mē concordant carmina nervīs.
  20. 20. Adapted Passage #2 (ll. 504-509) 'nympha, precor, Pēnēi, manē! nōn īnsequor hostis; nympha, manē! sīcut agna lupum fugit, sīcut cerva leōnem fugit, [505] sīcut columbae pennā trepidante aquilam fugiunt, sīcut quaeque suōs hostēs fugit: amor est causa sequendī mihi! mē miserum! nē prōna cadās, aut sentēs crūra indigna laedī notent, et sim tibi causa dolōris!
  21. 21. Adapted Passage # 2 Cont. (ll.510- 518)aspera sunt loca, in quibus properās: curre moderātius, [510] precor, inhibē fugam, ego ipse insequar moderātius. inquīre tamen, cui placeās: non incola montis sum, nōn ego sum pastor, nōn horridus observō hīc armenta gregēsque. nescīs quem temeraria fugiās, ideōque fugis: habeō Delphicam tellūrem; [515] Iuppiter est meus genitor; ostendō quod eritque fuitque estque; per mē concordant carmina nervīs.
  22. 22. How the Myth Ends • Daphne calls upon her father to save her and he transforms her into a laurel tree • Apollo reaches the tree and embraces it • Because he cannot take Daphne as his wife, he takes her as his tree • The laurel becomes a symbol of Apollo and victory (a symbol Augustus himself used)
  23. 23. What sort of pursuit is Apollo making in Ovid’s story? One for hunt, love, victory? All of the above? Discussion Question #3 How does this fit in with Augustus’ presentation of Apollo?
  24. 24. DAY THREE Shakespearean Comparison
  25. 25. Shakespearean Comparison Introduction In this passage (scene ii, act II) from Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Demtrius seeks the couple Hermia (whom he loves) and Lysander in the woods and Helena, in love with Demetrius, follows after him. Later in the story, the creature Puck uses a flower (one supposedly struck by Cupid’s arrow) to cause the lovers to involuntarily fall erroneously in love with others from the group.
  26. 26. Midsummer Night’s Dream Comparison Helena, about her love for Demetrius, says: “O that my prayers could such affection move!” (1.1.197). Demetrius to Helena says: “I’ll run from thee, and hide me in the brakes” (2.2.227) Helena, in pursuit, responds: “The story shall be changed Apollo flies, and Daphne holds the chase; The dove pursues the griffin; the mild hind Makes speed to catch the tiger” (2.1.230-4)
  27. 27. BibliographyLaFleur, Richard A. Love and Transformation: An Ovid Reader. Glenview: Scott Foresman/Addison Wesley, 1999. Shakespeare, William. “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The Wadsworth Shakespeare: The Complete Works. Ed. G. B. Evans and J.J. M. Tobin. Boston: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, 1997. Zanker, P. The Power of Images in the Age of Augustus. Trans. Alan Shapiro. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan, 1988. "Ovid." Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World. Ed. Roberts, John. : Oxford University Press, 2007. Date Accessed 22 Mar. 2014 <http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780192801463.001.0001/acref- 9780192801463-e-1578>. Platner & Ashby “Aedes Apollinis Palatini." LacusCurtius Temple of Apollo Palatine. 1929. Web. 22 Mar. 2014. <http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/Gazetteer/Places/Europe/Italy/Lazio/Roma/Rome/_ Texts/PLATOP%2A/Aedes_Apollinis_Palatini.html>. "Apollo." Oxford Dictionary of the Classical World. Ed. Roberts, John. : Oxford University Press, 2007. Oxford Reference. 2007. Date Accessed 1 May. 2014 <http://www.oxfordreference.com/view/10.1093/acref/9780192801463.001. 0001/acref-9780192801463-e-170>.
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