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Rehearsal procedures: Theater I
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Rehearsal procedures: Theater I

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  • Genre is the TYPE of play. Different play genres include comedy, drama, tragedy, farce, musicals, etc. Directors also do a character analysis for all of the characters in the script. Knowing the characters helps them identify beat changes and objectives which drive the plot. Directors also have to understand setting in order to create the ground plan, or stage map. Theme often drives the message that the audience will walk away from the show with.

Rehearsal procedures: Theater I Rehearsal procedures: Theater I Presentation Transcript

  • Rehearsal Process (Info for FINAL!)
  • At your table, DISCUSS:
    • Have you ever “tried out” for anything? What was it?
    • How were those tryouts run/organized?
    • Did you enjoy your experience? Why or why not?
  • 4/13: From Script to Stage Or, “You’re putting on a ‘show.’ So what?”
  • 1. Choosing a Play
  • Choosing a Play…
    • Directors and producers choose the play. Often, just the director.
    • They choose plays that they enjoy, that “speak” to them and their audience.
  • Choosing a Play…
    • In high school productions, directors take into consideration WHO THEY HAVE and SPECIFIC CHALLENGES.
  • Choosing a Play…
    • What does “who they have” mean?
    • What types of challenges would a high school director have that would affect play selection?
  • 2. Reading the Play
  • Directors read to know:
    • genre
    • characters
    • plot
    • setting
    • theme
  • Other fun stuff…
    • A dramaturg may work with a director before and during rehearsals.
    • Dramaturgs are consultants who research & provide specific in-depth info to the director and actors.
  • 3. AUDITIONS!
  • AUDITIONS may be held in two ways:
    • Cold Readings
    • In a “cold” reading, the actor reads from a piece of the script (a “side”) with another actor or actors.
    • Monologues
    • In this type of audition, actors come prepared with one or more memorized monologues to perform.
  • Which type of audition would YOU prefer? WHY?
  • Who ELSE is at this AUDITION???
    • Director
    • Assistant Director (if there is one!)
    • Stage Manager
    • Producer (sometimes)
  • Directors look for actors who:
    • physically “fit” the parts
    • can be heard
    • can take direction
  • Answer these questions in your notes!
    • Q1. Which audition-type would you rather be part of? Why?
    • Q2. What kind of role would you like to play? Comedic? Dramatic? Give a description of a character you’d like to play.
  • Discuss at your table:
    • Think back to the first day of school. . .
    • What did your teachers go over?
    • What did you DO in class that day ?
  • #4: Casting Choosing the Right People to do the Job
  • On Casting…
    • After reading the quotes, why do you think directors believe casting is so important?
    • “ Casting is everything. If you get the right people they make you look good.”
    • “ Casting is 65 percent of directing. “
    • “ Casting is sort of like looking at paintings. You don't know what you'll like, but you recognize it when you see it. “
  • The First Rehearsal Getting our Act Together
  • What to Expect:
    • The director will distribute scripts.
    • The stage manager and/or director will go over rehearsal etiquette & expectations.
  • What to Expect:
    • Contracts (if any) will be signed/returned.
    • Cast and crew introductions will be made.
  • What to Expect:
    • Rehearsal schedules will be distributed.
    • A contact list will be distributed.
  • What to Expect:
    • The cast will do a “read-through,” the initial reading of the script.
  • Why do you think it’s important to do cast & crew introductions at the first rehearsal?
  • Why do you think a “contact list” is important to a cast & crew?
  • Production Meetings (What do all those techies DO, anyway?)
  • Production Meeting FACTS…
    • Production meetings involve ALL TECHNICAL positions.
    • They are typically held 3-4 times during rehearsal period.
  • Production Meeting FACTS…
    • Topics of discussion include:
    • Design concepts
    • Scheduling
    • Overall tech (lights, sound, costumes, etc.)
  • Production Meeting FACTS…
    • Topics of discussion include:
    • Budget
    • Publicity
    • House management
  • Name the areas of technical theater that would be included in production meetings.
  • GROUP Writing (Will be turned in today!)
    • In your group, discuss
    • the budget of a
    • production. Answer
    • the following on a
    • sheet of paper.
    • One per group.
    • Name 10-15 things that a production would spend money on. (Think of areas of technical theater!)
    • Which of these do you think is the most expensive? Why?
  • Discuss at your tables:
    • Think of some classes where you are expected to work independently (i.e. where the teacher doesn’t hover over you all the time).
    • In which classes does this occur?
    • What rules are you expected to follow in class while working independently?
  • #6. Rehearsals A How-To Guide
  • What to Bring With You:
    • A pencil. Not a pen.
    • Your script. Always .
    • A good attitude.
  • Why must you bring a pencil? Why can’t you use a pen? What do you think might happen if a cast member forgot their script?
  • Rehearsal Procedures
    • Actors & crew members sign in. (Think: taking roll.)
    • Warm-ups – director’s choice. Sometimes improv games, sometimes stretches.
    • Crew and/or cast set-up. They get stage set up with furniture, props, etc. Sometimes they’ll just “tape it.”
  • What happens if an actor or crew member is absent? What is the purpose of “warm-ups?” What does “taping” or “marking out” the set mean?
  • Procedures, cont.
    • 4. Director or stage manager gives the start. Usually, a page number or a line.
    • 5. Actors take places. They know where they should be on stage!
    • 6. Director gives blocking.
    • 7. ACTORS WRITE THEIR BLOCKING IN THEIR SCRIPT. IN PENCIL ONLY.
  • What is “blocking?” Who else at the rehearsal will write down blocking for actors? Why is writing down your blocking so Important?
  • Why do you think it’s important to do cast & crew introductions at the first rehearsal?
  • Why do you think a “contact list” is important to a cast & crew?
  • Name the areas of technical theater that would be included in production meetings.
  • GROUP Writing (Will be turned in today!)
    • In your group, discuss
    • the budget of a
    • production. Answer
    • the following on a
    • sheet of paper.
    • One per group.
    • Name 10-15 things that a production would spend money on. (Think of areas of technical theater!
    • Which of these do you think is the most expensive? Why?