Elizabethan Theatre Conventions of the Time
Convention <ul><li>Special or traditional way of doing things </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some conventions of our time?...
The Elizabethan Era HIGHLIGHTS <ul><li>Queen Elizabeth I embodied power and beauty </li></ul><ul><li>An extravagant and br...
p Performances started in inn yards/taverns
<ul><li>Evolved to  outdoor stages </li></ul>
 
Elizabethan Theatre <ul><li>Finally ended up in  theatres </li></ul>
 
TAVERNS  OUTDOOR STAGES THEATRES
Theatre Structure Public theaters were either  a round, square, or octagonal wooden structure which  consisted of: <ul><li...
Major Elizabethan Theatres  <ul><li>-The Theatre  (1576)  first theatre </li></ul><ul><li>- The Rose  (1587)  a rose by an...
The Globe Theater <ul><li>Built in 1599  by Cuthbert Burbage </li></ul><ul><li>Burned  to the ground after a cannon malfun...
Cockpit Salisbury Red   Lion Curtain Rose Swan Globe Theatre Fortune Red Bull Boar’s Head Hope Bell Inn Blackfriars Paul’s...
Yay! The Globe!
Shakespeare performed many of his plays at  The Globe Theatre  including:
<ul><li>Productions were  performed during the daytime  – candles were the only light source available </li></ul><ul><li>F...
SEATING <ul><li>Determined by  the  wealth  and the  social status  of the people. </li></ul><ul><li>The  wealthiest  peop...
- GROUNDLINGS: People standing on the ground in front of the stage.  This was the  cheapest  area.
<ul><li>-Performers often tried to please the groundlings more than others.  Why? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Threw food! </...
<ul><li>Theatres were shut down because of the plague </li></ul><ul><li>Alternatives? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Origin of trav...
BEAR BAITING __________________ ________________________
Rooster Fights __________________ ________________________
Public Executions
Public Executions By hanging, drawing, and quartering for the traitors
Public Executions By burning for heretics Monty Python and the Holy Grail: &quot;She's a Witch!&quot;
Public Executions By boiling in oil for prisoners
Acting Companies <ul><li>Before the theaters  were built, performances were put on by  traveling troupes   </li></ul><ul><...
Actors <ul><li>Actors were expected to  be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>sing </li></ul><ul><li>clown </li></ul><ul><li>weapo...
 
<ul><li>Women did not perform </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Female roles were performed by young boys </li></ul></ul>
Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>Playwrights were practical men bent on making a living </li></ul><ul><li>Once a playwright...
Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>William Shakespeare  – be able to name five plays that he wrote </li></ul><ul><li>Christop...
Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>Ben Jonson  Volpone  – man fakes his own death  (greed/poor morals) </li></ul><ul><li>Thom...
Costumes <ul><li>Consisted of  Elizabethan clothing </li></ul>
 
 
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Elizabethan theater and shakespeare

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  • DISCOVERY SPACE: a small room behind a curtain - which allows characters to be suddenly revealed by opening the curtain Behind the entrances is the TIRING HOUSE, for actors to dress, prepare and wait offstage.
  • Many Inns were used as playhouses until the theatres began to be built in London from 1576 - 1629
  • Coach students to remember one play performed at the Globe
  • Start clip at about 2:10, end about 6:00 when Richard Dreyfuss says “We can do RAPIERS.”
  • Transcript of "Elizabethan theater and shakespeare"

    1. 1. Elizabethan Theatre Conventions of the Time
    2. 2. Convention <ul><li>Special or traditional way of doing things </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What are some conventions of our time? </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. The Elizabethan Era HIGHLIGHTS <ul><li>Queen Elizabeth I embodied power and beauty </li></ul><ul><li>An extravagant and brutal age! </li></ul><ul><li>The first theaters in England appeared </li></ul>
    4. 4. p Performances started in inn yards/taverns
    5. 5. <ul><li>Evolved to outdoor stages </li></ul>
    6. 7. Elizabethan Theatre <ul><li>Finally ended up in theatres </li></ul>
    7. 9. TAVERNS OUTDOOR STAGES THEATRES
    8. 10. Theatre Structure Public theaters were either a round, square, or octagonal wooden structure which consisted of: <ul><li>unroofed courtyard </li></ul><ul><li>roofed galleries </li></ul><ul><li>platform stage </li></ul><ul><li>tiring-house </li></ul><ul><li>curtained discovery space </li></ul><ul><li>trap door </li></ul>
    9. 11. Major Elizabethan Theatres <ul><li>-The Theatre (1576) first theatre </li></ul><ul><li>- The Rose (1587) a rose by any other name… odor problem! </li></ul>
    10. 12. The Globe Theater <ul><li>Built in 1599 by Cuthbert Burbage </li></ul><ul><li>Burned to the ground after a cannon malfunction (1642) </li></ul><ul><li>associated with Shakespeare </li></ul>
    11. 13. Cockpit Salisbury Red Lion Curtain Rose Swan Globe Theatre Fortune Red Bull Boar’s Head Hope Bell Inn Blackfriars Paul’s Bulls Inn BelSavage Inn Cross Keys Inn
    12. 14. Yay! The Globe!
    13. 15. Shakespeare performed many of his plays at The Globe Theatre including:
    14. 16. <ul><li>Productions were performed during the daytime – candles were the only light source available </li></ul><ul><li>Flag flown on the playhouse usually alerted citizens that a play would be shown that day </li></ul>
    15. 17. SEATING <ul><li>Determined by the wealth and the social status of the people. </li></ul><ul><li>The wealthiest people took the best seats (higher up = better!) </li></ul>
    16. 18. - GROUNDLINGS: People standing on the ground in front of the stage. This was the cheapest area.
    17. 19. <ul><li>-Performers often tried to please the groundlings more than others. Why? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Threw food! </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yelled at performers! </li></ul></ul></ul>
    18. 20. <ul><li>Theatres were shut down because of the plague </li></ul><ul><li>Alternatives? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Origin of traveling theatre troupes </li></ul></ul>
    19. 21. BEAR BAITING __________________ ________________________
    20. 22. Rooster Fights __________________ ________________________
    21. 23. Public Executions
    22. 24. Public Executions By hanging, drawing, and quartering for the traitors
    23. 25. Public Executions By burning for heretics Monty Python and the Holy Grail: &quot;She's a Witch!&quot;
    24. 26. Public Executions By boiling in oil for prisoners
    25. 27. Acting Companies <ul><li>Before the theaters were built, performances were put on by traveling troupes </li></ul><ul><li>They had the reputation of being vagabonds </li></ul><ul><li>Many people gathered and sometimes behaved in disorderly manner Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead: Travelling Theater Troupe </li></ul>
    26. 28. Actors <ul><li>Actors were expected to be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>sing </li></ul><ul><li>clown </li></ul><ul><li>weapon/sword skills for stage combat </li></ul><ul><li>perform acrobatic feats </li></ul><ul><li>dance </li></ul>
    27. 30. <ul><li>Women did not perform </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Female roles were performed by young boys </li></ul></ul>
    28. 31. Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>Playwrights were practical men bent on making a living </li></ul><ul><li>Once a playwright sold his manuscript, he had no personal right to it </li></ul><ul><li>Plays were written to be acted , not read </li></ul>
    29. 32. Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>William Shakespeare – be able to name five plays that he wrote </li></ul><ul><li>Christopher Marlowe Dr. Faustus – man sells his soul to the devil for power and knowledge </li></ul>
    30. 33. Elizabethan Playwrights <ul><li>Ben Jonson Volpone – man fakes his own death (greed/poor morals) </li></ul><ul><li>Thomas Middleton The Chaste Maid of Cheapside – exposed the harsh reality of prostitution, sin, and poverty </li></ul>
    31. 34. Costumes <ul><li>Consisted of Elizabethan clothing </li></ul>

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