• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Matt Medeiros Portfolio
 

Matt Medeiros Portfolio

on

  • 854 views

Portfolio for landscape historian and writer Matt Medeiros

Portfolio for landscape historian and writer Matt Medeiros

Statistics

Views

Total Views
854
Views on SlideShare
853
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
4
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Matt Medeiros Portfolio Matt Medeiros Portfolio Presentation Transcript

    • Matt Medeiros
    • Matt Medeiros My intention in presenting this writing sample and work samples is to showcase my writing and research abilities, graphic abilities, and the recurring themes of my work: his- tory as a heritage resource, and sustainability. The Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC) entry is an excerpt from Warren H, Manning, a biography of landscape architect and planner Warren Manning that will be published by the Library of American Landscape History. Being the most recent entry I’ve created, it is the culmination of my work thus far as a writer and researcher. In writing the entry I searched the college’s archives for previous campus plans, and researched Warren Manning’s intentions using letters, plan drawings, and documents written during that time pe- riod by Manning himself and his colleagues in the project. My master’s project encompasses my personal and profes- sional interests in music and historic landcapes. Sustain- ability came into the picture as I explored current challenges in the performance industry. By creating a sustainability master plan, I put into practice the results of my research us- ing an actual site slated for development as a music venue. Mountain Park is an area with significant resources such as wildlife habitat, wetlands, recreational opportunities, and the site’s cultural heritage as a favorite of Holyokers since the amusement park opened in 1894. Creating the masterplan I was also able to utilize the site analysis skills I’d developed during graduate school while exploring mapping via ArcGIS, and the graphic power of CAD, Photoshop, Illustrator, and Sketchup. My hand graphics, and panorama transfers are another side to the visual elements in my work. I included them to give a sense of the whole picture of my visual senses and abilities. Page 2
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample MASSACHUSETTS for an agricultural school, one of numerous land-grant col- AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE leges throughout the country enabled by the Morrill Act. The Amherst, MA topography of the campus landscape ranged from a large hill named Prexy’s Ridge on the eastern side to a plateau known The Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC) entry is an as Chestnut Ridge in the center of the land, and a downward excerpt from Warren H. Manning, a two-volume biography of slope on the western edge of the campus. The land was rich landscape architect and planner Warren Manning that will be in wetland systems and Cushman Creek flowed north-south published by the Library of American Landscape History. The first volume is a biography of Manning’s life. My involvement through the center of campus, then drained into a ravine that in the project is to create entries for the second volume, which ran east-west and led to the Mill River as it flowed south on the researches Manning’s significant designs and assesses their western edge of the campus towards its mouth on the Con- preservation. necticut River 4 miles west of campus. 4 Existing roads con- sisted of North Pleasant Street, which ran north-south through Entry Researched and Written by Matt Medeiros the center of campus, and East Pleasant Street, which was a north-south route along Prexy’s Ridge at the eastern edge of In June 1911, landscape architect Warren Manning submitted campus. The first class of students wouldn’t arrive until 1867, a campus master plan to the building and grounds commission but once the land was bought the board of trustees had al- of Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC), now the Univer- ready agreed that the College should be housed on the central sity of Massachusetts, Amherst. His report was the result of plateau of Chestnut Ridge within one large building that would three years of working with the members of the commission accommodate student housing, classrooms, and offices for and a team of architects who had been hired to design several faculty and administrators. 5 new buildings.1 Campus planning was not new for Manning. In 1896 he had developed designs for Mount Holyoke College, With this project Manning joined a list of eminent designers and in 1908 he had created a campus plan for the University who had contributed designs for the campus, beginning with of Minnesota in Minneapolis. During the same time period that landscape architect Calvert Vaux and architect Joseph Rich- he worked at MAC, he also drafted plans for the North Carolina ards (in late 1865 or early 1866) and followed by Frederick Normal and Industrial College (Now University of North Caro- Law Olmsted (1866). The central planning issue at the time of lina Greensboro), and the University of Virginia. 2 A report on the College’s founding was locating the area for new buildings campus planning at MAC by landscape architect Frank Waugh, and a campus core, which the board wanted in the geographic the founding head of the College’s department of landscape center of the land, but both Vaux and Richards and later Olm- gardening, notes that the commissioners may have been sted recommended an area to the east at the base of Prexy’s aware of Manning because at that time his firm employed a Ridge. 6 Olmsted went further from the board’s preferences MAC alumnus, “a person of special ability” as Manning put it, and proposed emulating the feel of a New England village with named Albert Davis Taylor. 3 a cluster of smaller buildings around a central common and suggested damming the creek to create a pond on the western Massachusetts Agricultural College was created in 1863, edge of his recommended campus site. 7 Strong disagreement when 310 acres of land were bought from six Amherst farmers among the board and MAC president French delayed action Page 3
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample on Olmsted’s recommendations, which were shelved in 1867, The campus in 1911 (Figure 1) consisted of 484.5 acres that when William Smith Clark became MAC president and took were agricultural in character, surrounded by open fields for over the campus design project. When Clark left office in 1879, use by the agriculture departments, and thirty-nine buildings the campus had expanded to include a grouping on Chestnut clustered around a large lawn edged by specimen trees with Ridge of half a dozen residential scale buildings made of brick and frame, as well as a new campus entrance along East Pleasant Street. During the ensuing years, the landscape was chiefly laid out by S. T. Maynard, (the professor of horticulture), and James Draper, chair of the campus planning and land- scape committee. The campus pond, still one of the campus’s most distinctive landscape features, was created in 1892 during Draper and Maynard’s tenure by damming the brook as Olmsted had first suggested. 8 According to institutional records, the next campus plans were both submitted on May 19, 1908 by Waugh and architect F.I. Cooper. 9 Though the board had asked the two to collaborate, a misunderstanding of these instructions resulted in Waugh and Cooper creating separate plans. 10 Manning’s autobiogra- phy states that both of these plans focused on the question of how to group new buildings with the existing ones on campus, 11 and a subsequent note from President Kenyon But- terfield to Manning dated June 1908 clarified that the idea of the board was to create clusters of buildings grouped accord- ing to categories such as academic, science, agricultural, and so on. 12 Manning’s involvement began at the same May 1908 meeting at which Waugh’s and Cooper’s plans were presented. After listening to the presentations, the commissioners re- solved to invite Manning to “study the arrangement of buildings and grounds . . . with a view to the establishment of a perma- nent plan.” 13 It is not apparent from existing records whether he was suggested as a third-party to resolve the conflicting suggestions from the two competing plans, or whether there was some other motivation for hiring a new designer rather than continuing with Waugh and Cooper. Figure 1: Manning’s 1911 Drawing of Existing Conditions (source: UMASS Archives) Page 4
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample the campus pond at its center. The road network consisted two tree lined lawns at the center of campus that surrounded of North Pleasant Street, a public way, in its current route. In the Campus Pond and which Manning called the “East Cam- addition there were two lanes to the east and west of North pus Green” and “West Campus Green.” Manning shared Ol- Pleasant named Stockbridge Road and Olmsted Road. These msted’s concerns about the safety of traffic on North Pleasant internal roads connected with North Pleasant on the northern Street, and the 1911 plan closed North Pleasant Street to all and southern entrances to the campus and followed a circular traffic except for electric streetcar, but otherwise preserved the pattern flowing north-south around it. The campus was bi- existing road network in the campus core. sected north–south by the pond, which emptied into Cushman Creek as it flowed into a ravine that ran east-west in an area In terms of new features, Manning’s plan is significant as the that is now occupied by the University’s physical plant build- first in MAC’s history to integrate then-new modes of transpor- ing. Then, as now, the creek emptied into the Mill River on the tation by expanding circulation on the perimeter with elec- western edge of campus. 14 tric streetcars running along routes that closely anticipated the present-day automobile roads, and a new auto highway In his autobiography Manning states that in formulating his along the eastern side of campus at the foot of Prexy’s Ridge. plan he “went back to the studies of Vaux and Richards in Another significant element of the 1911 plan was a proposed 1864, and to the very important report and plan of Frederick scenic roadway to the Connecticut River that would have run Law Olmsted, Sr. in 1866,” 15 and it is evident that his plan is from campus along the Mill River, thereby physically connect- especially influenced by Olmsted’s sensitive use of the site’s ing the College to one of the most prominent features of the topography to organize the campus, his concern about the Pioneer Valley region’s natural landscape. A second pond was traffic on North Pleasant Street, and the campus green as a also envisioned by Manning where the Campus Center now dominant landscape feature. The idea of topography as an stands, which would have expanded the park-like feel of the organizing element is first present in an archival plan, dated two large campus greens that existed during his time. Beyond September 1910 (Figure 2), that consists of a color drawing the campus greens, Manning planned for agricultural fields and designating regions of the campus according to site topog- orchards all beyond the core campus buildings and raphy: an Uplands area along Prexy’s Ridge in the east, a lawn. 17 Many elements of the 1911 plan were not instituted, Midlands area in Chestnut ridge at the center of campus, and a such as the second pond or the scenic drive on the Mill River, Lowlands area on the western side of campus. 16 but Manning’s influence on the campus in 2011 can still be seen in the placement of buildings built during his time as the Manning’s final plan, dated September 1911, (Figure 3) incor- campus designer, French Hall and Fernald Hall. 18 Manning’s porates Olmsted’s sensitive treatment of the site’s topography, 1911 plan also anticipates the external road system around and also includes his idea of a campus green and his concern North Pleasant Street that Sasaki proposed and the University about the safety of traffic on North Pleasant Street. The 1911 then instituted in 1962. plan combines Manning’s earlier topographical scheme for new growth while creating the groupings of academic build- Since Manning submitted his 1911 plan to the MAC trustees, ings specified by the College president and the buildings and much has changed in the landscape and at the College. Man- grounds commission. Manning also recommended preserving ning continued consulting periodically for at least another two Page 5
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample Figure 2: Manning’s 1910 Plan Figure 3: Manning’s 1911 Plan (source: UMASS Archives) (source: UMASS Archives) Page 6
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample years. 19 In 1920 and again in 1932, Waugh created a plan that from the firms of Wilson Architects and Ayers Saint Gross. preserved the campus greens, and while some elements of Their stated goals are to integrate neighborhoods within the Waugh’s plan were not followed-the green campus core was campus, strengthen open spaces, improve connections, and preserved relatively undisturbed until 1962. As MAC became create a more compact and sustainable campus. 24 One hopes Massachusetts State College, in 1932, and then the University that the new team will show the wisdom Manning did, and of Massachusetts, in 1947, enrollment soared. In 1953 the integrate suitable ideas from previous designers with visionary firm of Shurcliff, Shurcliff, and Merrill created a plan that called planning for future growth at the University. for enlarging the campus by more than a quarter from 821 to 1,121 acres. The plan dealt with the new dominance of auto transportation in a way that preserved the campus green by shuttling traffic and parking to the edges of campus. Like Man- ning, the Shurcliff plan called for the closing of North Pleasant Street to autos, but the plan also envisioned an urban cam- pus replacing the fields and orchards still along the campus perimeter. The final drawing shows dense groupings of build- ings centered on courtyards and parking ringing the perimeter of the new buildings. Much of this plan was not instituted. In 1962, the firm of Sasaki, Dawson and DeMay created a masterplan to accommodate still-increasing enrollment (Figure 4). Although subsequent plans were developed internally, in 1993 and in 2007, Sasaki’s plan most significantly shaped the campus as it exists today. The plan eliminated internal roads such as Stockbridge Road and Olmsted Road and created a network of perimeter roads that bear more than a passing re- semblance to those proposed in Manning’s 1911 plan. Sasaki’s plan broke with previous plans though, by siting buildings much closer to the campus pond and reducing the greenspace that Manning had formalized. 20 Today 356 buildings are densely arranged 21 on a campus that contained only 39 buildings in Manning’s time. 22 The campus has almost tripled in size, from 484.5 acres in 1911 to 1,400 in Figure 4: Sasaki’s 1962 Plan 2011. Many of the buildings built since the 1960s are at such (source: UMASS Archives) a large scale that the campus as a space feels dominated by architecture rather than by landscape. 23 In 2010 the University Documents began another round of planning, with two architectural teams 1. Warren H. Manning, Report Upon A Plan for The Massachusetts Agri- Page 7
    • Matt Medeiros Writing Sample cultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 24 18. Frank A. Waugh, Development of the Grounds of the Massachusetts June 1911, 1 Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 2. Warren H. Manning, Client List, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, 1920, 11 Center for Lowell History, re-sorted and converted to PDF by LALH, Low- 19. Warren H. Manning, Study for Relocation of Infirmary, University of ell, MA, June 2007, 18, 26, 29, 42 Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 20 December 1913 3. Frank A. Waugh, Development of the Grounds of the Massachusetts 20. University of Massachusetts Campus Planning Department, Cam- Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, pus Physical Master Plan Update, University of Massachusetts Planning 1920, 9. Warren H. Manning, The Autobiography of Warren H. Manning, Document, Amherst, MA, 2007, 5-7 University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Center for Lowell History, transcrip- 21. Ayers Saint Grosse Architects and Wilson Architects, Framework Plan: tion by LALH (PDF), Lowell, MA, 1937, 244 Preliminary Observations of Existing Conditions, University of Massachu- 4. Warren H. Manning, Massachusetts Agricultural College Existing Condi- setts Planning Document, Amherst, MA, June 2010, 86 tions 1870, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 24 June 22. Warren H. Manning, Massachusetts Agricultural College Map of Exist- 1911 ing Conditions, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, June 5. Laura Wood Roper, F.L.O.: A Biography of Frederick Law Olmsted, 1911 John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD, 1983, 309-310 23. University of Massachusetts Campus Planning Department, Cam- 6. Frank A. Waugh, Development of the Grounds of the Massachusetts pus Physical Master Plan Update, University of Massachusetts Planning Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, Document, Amherst, MA, 2007, 6 1920, 3-4 24. Ayers Saint Grosse Architects and Wilson Architects, Framework Plan: 7. Frederick Law Olmsted, A Few Things To Be Thought Of Before Pro- Preliminary Observations of Existing Conditions, University of Massachu- ceeding To Plan Buildings For The National Agricultural Colleges, Univer- setts Planning Document, Amherst, MA, June 2010, 11 sity of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 1866 8. Frank A. Waugh, Development of the Grounds of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 1920, 6-7 9. Frank A. Waugh, Commission on Buildings and Grounds Meeting Min- utes, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 19 May 1908 10. Frank A. Waugh, Development of the Grounds of the Massachusetts Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 1920 11. Warren H. Manning, The Autobiography of Warren H. Manning, Uni- versity of Massachusetts, Lowell, Center for Lowell History, transcription by LALH (PDF), Lowell, MA, 1937, 147 12. Warren H. Manning, President Butterfield’s Letter to W.H. Manning dated June 11, 1908 - A Summary, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, undated 13. Frank A. Waugh, Commission on Buildings and Grounds Meeting Min- utes, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 19 May 1908 14. Warren H. Manning, Report Upon A Plan for The Massachusetts Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 24 June 1911, 2-5. Warren H. Manning, Massachusetts Agricultural Col- lege Map of Existing Conditions, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, June 1911 15. Warren H. Manning, The Autobiography of Warren H. Manning, Uni- versity of Massachusetts, Lowell, Center for Lowell History, transcription by LALH (PDF), Lowell, MA, 1937, 147 16. Warren H. Manning, Massachusetts Agricultural College General Plan, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, September 1910 17. Warren H. Manning, Report Upon A Plan for The Massachusetts Agricultural College, University of Massachusetts Archives, Amherst, MA, 24 June 1911, 2-7 Page 8
    • Matt Medeiros Mountain Park, Holyoke, MA: Sustainability Masterplan Source: MassGIS, PVTA Northampton Regional Context of Mountain Park Mountain Park is located in the northern area of Holyoke, on the southern slopes of Mount Tom. It was the location of an amusement park and resort from 1894 until 1987.Spring 2009 MLA ProjectUniversity of Massachusetts Easthampton Encompassing 60 acres, Mountain Park is in private owner-Instructors: Peter Kumble, South ship. The owner is proposing creation of an outdoor venue similar to Tanglewood. While the site is zoned for commer-Mark Hamin Hadley cial development, there are concerns in the community Southampton due to the proximity to Mount Tom and its conservationThe project encompassed four Mountain areas.stages: Park The site has direct access from Route 5, good proximity to N Interstates 91 and 90, and possible transit connections.1. Literature Review on achiev- Chicopeeeing sustainability for outdoorperformance venues West2. Case studies of Wolf Trap Source: MassGIS, Ducharme 2008, Mount Tom Commission 1993 Source: MassGIS, Ducharme 2008, Mount Tom Commission 1993National Park for the Perform-ing Arts and Bonnaroo Musicand Arts Festival Land Uses Near Mountain Park3. Site analysis of Mountain Mountain Park was part of a whole resort meant to encour-Park in Holyoke, MA age riders to ride to the end of the streetcar network in Holyoke. At its height Mountain Park stretched from Mount Tom’s summit to the river and encompassed a summit4. Three Concepts and a Final house, ski area, zoo, dinosaur tracks, and the amusementSustainability Masterplan park. Most of the parcels that made up the park are now owned by the state Department of Conservation and Recreation. Other properties adjacent to the site include the inactive Whiting Reservoir, a gravel mining operation, and the Wyckoff Golf Course. N 0 900 Page 9
    • Matt Medeiros Mountain Park, Holyoke, MA: Sustainability MasterplanThe Masterplan brings togetherthree concepts relating to ecolog-ic sustainability, economic sus- Whiting Reservoir Trail to Whiting Reservoir Ntainability, and socially equitable Recreation and Rd Mount Tomsustainability. Concessions ess Acc rvoir seIt features: Re Historic Mount TomAmphitheater: outdoor seats Interpretation State Conservationand a 4,000 person capacity Amphitheater Venue Figure AreaIndoor Theatre: the indoor Parking C Picnic Shelter &theater can be used for music or Venue Concessionsplays and accommodates 200 Figure BConcessions: these two conces- Loading &sion areas are outside venue Figure Backstagesecurity to allow access for hikers Aera A Parking tor R dand concert-goers d Sk iR d omPicnic Area: a concessions area r kR Indoor Theater n tT Pa M oufor audience members only in untaTrails: the western entrance path Moforks to form a trail to the conser- Intvation areas of Mt. Tom ers 0 240 Bus Stop tatTransit Connections: there is a & e9bus stop and turnaround at the Turnaround 1 LegendentranceParking: accommodates 1300cars. The large audience lot is turf Rare Species Parceland all other parking areas are View Locator Wetlands Habitat Boundarypaved with gravelMidway Plaza: there is a plaza at Existing 10’ Contours (50 ft, 100 ft, Existing Trees Forest Edgethe venue’s entrance where there & 200 ft)is public art and signage aboutthe park’s history. The historic Source: Map Data from MassGIS,gates are relocated to serve as the Illustration and Design Page 10venue gateway. by Matt Medeiros
    • Matt Medeiros Mountain Park, Holyoke, MA: Sustainability Masterplan Source: Design and Sketchup Model by Matt MederosFigure A shows all majorstructures:- 4,000 person amphitheater- 200 person indoor theater- Preserved picnic structure Figure A- Re-interpreted midway area- Trailhead to hiking on Mount TomFigure B features a view of theentrance, which re-interpretsthe landscape features leftbehind from the amusementpark. The walkway to thevenue follows the historictrolley line route. Gates fromthe park’s original entrance Figure Bon Route 5 have been relo-cated here to create a sense ofgateway and continuity in thereborn Mountain Park.Figure C shows a view of themidway plaza, which evokesthe shape of the historicmerry-go-round that was relo-cated downtown, and wouldbe constructed using debrisfrom the demolished Midway Figure Cbuildings as a symbolic andsustainable gesture. Page 11
    • Matt Medeiros AutoCADAmphitheater Grading Plan:Site Engineering CourseSpring 2009This is a grading plan for anamphitheater, concessionarea and restrooms, parkinglot with 55 parking spots, andentrance drive.Existing 2’ contours are in-dicated by dotted lines, andproposed are solid and drawnat a 1’ interval.Stormwater is directed into aseries of bioswales and smallinfiltration areas, and to a levelspreader on the Northeasternportion of the site. Page 12
    • Matt Medeiros Hand Graphics and PhotographyThe WillistonNorthampton SchoolCampus MapMay 2008 27The school required updates 26 28 29to the campus map to reflect 30 31recent construction and ac- 25 24 32 33 36 37quisitions on the campus. In 23 34 38 39drawing the new buildings I 35carefully replicated the style 18 21 22of the existing map. 16 20 40 41 15 19 11 3Photography 14 1 43 42Easthampton Brownfields 12 10 9 8 44 45Panoramic Photo Transfers 13 7 6 5 47 4 46December 2008 T he W illiston 48 N orthampton School C ampusI relate to photography bothas visual expression, as wellas a practical tool for assess-ment of the landscape.This image was created bytaking a panoramic photo ofa site that had been contam-inated, and using a phototransfer technique to distortthe image according to thelevel of remediation that hasoccurred. Page 13