• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
How WordPress Themes Changed the World - 2011
 

How WordPress Themes Changed the World - 2011

on

  • 1,164 views

My slides from WordUp Edinburgh, note the typo on one of the final few slides :)

My slides from WordUp Edinburgh, note the typo on one of the final few slides :)

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,164
Views on SlideShare
1,121
Embed Views
43

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
10
Comments
0

1 Embed 43

http://wordup.wpscotland.org 43

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Apple Keynote

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n

How WordPress Themes Changed the World - 2011 How WordPress Themes Changed the World - 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • How WordPress ThemesChanged The World UPDATED by Michael Kimb Jones for WordUp Edinburgh 2011 http://mkjones.co.uk @mkjones
  • About me• 4 years agoin the NHS Work made the first Foundation Trust WordPress-powered website• I love WordPressa long search Started using in 2005 after for a solid CMS platform (Joomla, Drupal, PHP Nuke.. etc)• I love WordPress Themes!! For me, its always been about the themes. My personal site http://mkjones.co.uk
  • I love WordPress themes so much I made my own marketplace.....
  • ...ends shameless plug
  • not really.....
  • ......ok really this time
  • About this talk• History over the past few years before A look back Lesson premium themes and how we got to where we are today.• Commercial/Premium Themes A look at how people/businesses started to sell WordPress themes.• Case Studies/Success Stories How people/businesses have grown theme marketplaces and created businesses My personal site http://mkjones.co.uk
  • Why Themes?
  • The eureka moment....If you can design, if you know HTML/CSS and a little PHP, then chances are you can make a WordPress Theme
  • The eureka moment....If you can design, if you know HTML/CSS and a little PHP, then chances are you can make a WordPress Theme
  • the embarrassing baby photos
  • the embarrassing baby photos
  • MY FIRST THEME! Circa 2005 - personal blog theme - embarrassing!
  • MY FIRST THEME! Circa 2005 - personal blog theme - embarrassing!
  • ...and, my 2nd theme...A few months later - project for a local training company website
  • ...and, my 2nd theme...A few months later - project for a local training company website
  • Why Designers/Developerslove the WordPress theme platform• Provides a usable easy to learn platform• Well supported, lots of documentation, open-source and FREE• Anyone with intermediate CSS/HTML skills can pick up the basics and get theming• Improving all the time; &ameworks, parent themes, TwentyEleven etc...
  • The evolution of WordPress themes• Over the past 5 years the WordPress theme landscape has changed dramatically• Thousands of WP users are now developing beautiful and elegant themes either for themselves, for clients or as products/services which they can sell• This is significant because IMO it helped drive the growth and acceptance of WordPress more than anything else (i.e. plugins, CMS improvements, core upgrades...)
  • Think about it....Theme development is the most innovativedriving force in theWordPress ecosystem agree? / disagree?
  • The History Lesson
  • 5 years ago (ish).......if you wanted a theme, chances are, you would go here
  • 5 years ago (ish).......if you wanted a theme, chances are, you would go here
  • Today...there are a lot places to get (buy!) themes from
  • Today...there are a lot places to get (buy!) themes from
  • WordPress Commercial Themes How did we get here?
  • 4 years ago (ish)1. No theme clubs, 4. Most of the themes were marketplaces or stores simple blog themes, no cool options or features2. WordPress was still growing as a platform and 5. A few individuals creating was still seen as purely a the first ‘premium’ themes ‘blog’ platform 6. One of the first3. 1000’s of FREE themes in to see potential the directory of varying was WPDesigner.com quality
  • WP DesignerThe wpdesigner.com website by Small Potato (AKA Yung D0 now a DevPress partner)
  • WP DesignerThe wpdesigner.com website by Small Potato (AKA Yung D0 now a DevPress partner)
  • The WPDesigner Themes Club$5 per-year, 12 themes, support, tutorials, community
  • The WPDesigner Themes Club$5 per-year, 12 themes, support, tutorials, community
  • 6 months in, WP Designer was SOLDLess than 6 months after launching the theme club, Small Potato sold the site and moved on.Although the site went on to be a failure (http://bit.ly/q3vXVP) its legacy is everlasting.
  • 6 months in, WP Designer was SOLDLess than 6 months after launching the theme club, Small Potato sold the site and moved on.Although the site went on to be a failure (http://bit.ly/q3vXVP) its legacy is everlasting.
  • What did this prove?There was now serious money to be made selling premium WordPress themes
  • Meanwhile....Other personalities were becoming well known in the WP themearena and putting their own spin on the premium theme model
  • Meanwhile....Other personalities were becoming well known in the WP themearena and putting their own spin on the premium theme model
  • What happened next?The WordPress Commercial Theme Explosion TM 2008 - present
  • What happened next?The WordPress Commercial Theme Explosion TM 2008 - present
  • WordPress CommercialTheme Vendor Case Studies
  • StudioPress (aka Revolution, Revolution2)Founded by Brian Gardner. Evolved from the‘Revolution’ theme.Revenue Models Yearly subscription - $249 Access to Genesis &amework Access to a* child themes (and legacy themes) Access to support forums Access to future upgrades for 12 months Individual Purchase Genesis &amework - $59.95 Child themes - $80/$100 (lower in new marketplace) Access to related support forums Access to theme upgrades http://studiopress.com
  • StudioPress (aka Revolution, Revolution2)Other NotesBrian has changed his business model a numberof times before settling on StudioPress, recentchanges make the site part of the CopyBlo,erMedia businessRevolution/Revolution2 themes were FREE todownload with optional purchase of supportTheir Genesis framework is now central to theStudioPress brand and businessRecently introduced a ‘marketplace’ optionwhere selected Genesis-powered child themesare sold http://studiopress.com
  • DIYThemes/ThesisFounded by Chris Pearson. Centres aroundThesis, a single, customisable, user friendly theme.Revenue Model One-off payment - $164 or $87 Developer or Personal option Access to support forums Access to a* future upgrades Skins/Child/Sub-Themes Developed using built in custom CSS features Available though the DIY Themes community Theme sites such as http://thesisthemes.com also exist http://diythemes.com
  • DIYThemes/ThesisOther NotesOne of the first truly popular premium themesThesis used to be a strictly closed-source projectand didn’t embrace the GPL causing frictionbetween DIYThemes/WordPress in the pastThesis is one of the most popular and affiliatedWordPress-related products onlineMajor selling point is the Thesis advancedoptions panel which allows the most novice ofusers to create different layouts and quickdesigns easily using the product http://diythemes.com
  • WooThemesCo-founded by Adii Pienaar (AKA Adii Rockstar).A WordPress blogger and online personalityknown for the ‘Premium News Theme’.Revenue Model ‘Theme Club’ - $125/$200 joining fee + $15/$20 per-month Access to ALL themes/upgrades Access to support forums Individual Purchase Single/Standard/Developer - $40 $70 $150 Access to related support forums Access to theme upgrades Permanent 3-for-1 on a* single purchases http://woothemes.com
  • WooThemesOther NotesUses the first real subscription-based ‘theme club’model since the demise of WPDesignerRecently moved into the premium plugin marketwith WooCommerceInitially non-GPL, this was swiftly changed oncethe site became more establishedIn an interview with Mixergy.com Adii announcedthat the site had taken in over $2million dollarsin its first 2 years http://woothemes.com
  • ThemeForestPart of the ‘Envato Marketplaces’ founded byCollis Taeed (Tuts+, Freelance Switch).Revenue Model Digital Marketplace - no fixed price structure User submitted themes Revenue sharing on single sales Offers ‘regular’ or ‘extended’ licences on themes but a* themes are licensed under the GPL Theme Seller Options Se*ing Exclusively - 40% to 70% of every sale Se* Items Elsewhere - 25% of every sale http://themeforest.net
  • ThemeForestOther NotesAlso sells Joomla, Magento, Drupal and basicHTML/PSD, Flash-based productsUses GPL for PHP but not strictly for images,CSS, HTML - most themes have a mixed licensingsystemCan be highly profitable - For example a top userhas 2784 sales of theme worth $42 = $116,928The entire marketplace has almost 1millionregistered users http://themeforest.net
  • ThemeForest, a final noteSuccess stories...Other high earning examples include: Display Theme Makes an Average of $28,000 a Month LondonCreative+ Theme Makes an Average of $7,000 a Month Twicet Theme Makes an Average of $7,000 a Month ShareShifter Theme Makes an Average of $7,000 a Month BigFeature Theme Makes an Average of $5,500 a Month Find out more: http://themeforest.net/winter-wordpress/ http://themeforest.net
  • Recap...StudioPress DIYThemesMixed yearly subscription One-off fee revenue model.or individual item revenuemodel. Based around a single,Based around a WordPress strong product.Theme Framework. Relies on theme supportRelies on theme support and future upgrades.and future upgrades.Has a marketplace.WooThemes ThemeForestMixed monthly subscription One-off individual sales.fees or individual itemrevenue model. Community driven products.Now moving into Premium Revenue share.Plugins GPL/Mixed-licence model.Relies on theme supportand future upgrades. Part of a more elaborate network of sites.
  • Recap... StudioPress DIYThemes Mixed yearly subscription One-off fee revenue model. or individual item revenue model. Based around a single, Based around a WordPress strong product. Theme Framework. Relies on theme support Relies on theme support and future upgrades.Over just a few years these 4 sites alone have and future upgrades. managedmarketplace. Has a to generate millions of dollars in revenue by selling WordPress themes WooThemes ThemeForest Mixed monthly subscription One-off individual sales. fees or individual item revenue model. Community driven products. Now moving into Premium Revenue share. Plugins GPL/Mixed-licence model. Relies on theme support and future upgrades. Part of a more elaborate network of sites.
  • So.....
  • Changed the world ?Probably not.
  • Changed the web?Maybe.
  • Changed WordPress?Defiantly.
  • Done...
  • Have WordPress Themes Changed the World? What do you think? questions, discussion....