Workshop: Learning Spaces - National University of Singapore

8,969 views
8,869 views

Published on

Personal learning spaces constitute the formal and informal spaces and technologies customised by the learner or teacher. They are spaces that are owned by the learner or teacher. However, insufficient attention has been given to providing assistance to learners and teachers to design their own personal learning spaces. This workshop provides a framework for personal learning spaces that includes: distributed learning spaces, seamless learning and principles of learning space design that assist learners and teachers to design their own personal learning spaces. Distributed learning spaces include physical, blended, virtual mobile, personal, outdoor, academic and professional practice spaces (Keppell & Riddle, 2012). Seamless learning occurs when a person experiences a continuity of learning across a combination of locations, times, technologies or social settings (Sharples, et al, 2012). Seven principles of learning space design include: comfort, aesthetics, flow, equity, blending, affordances and repurposing (Souter, Riddle & Keppell, 2010). By taking account of distributed learning spaces, seamless learning and principles of learning space design both learners and teachers will be empowered to construct their own personal learning spaces.

Published in: Education, Technology

Workshop: Learning Spaces - National University of Singapore

  1. 1. Owning the Place of Learning: Principles for Designing Personal Learning Spaces for Learners and Teachers TeL 2013 - Technology Enhanced Learning Towards an Engaging & Meaningful Digital Future NUS, Singapore October 7-8, 2013 Professor Mike Keppell Executive Director Australian Digital Futures Institute Director, Digital Futures - CRN 1Tuesday, 8 October 13
  2. 2. Overview n Provide an overview of distributed learning spaces n Examine seven principles of learning space design n Explore affordances of learning spaces n Design personal learning spaces 2 2Tuesday, 8 October 13
  3. 3. Schedule - 9:30 - 12:30 n 9:30-10:45 n Trends and challenges n Defining Space n Distributed spaces n Principles n 10:45-11:15 Break n 11:15 - 12:30 n Analysis of spaces n Evaluating our current space n Affordances n Next steps 3 3Tuesday, 8 October 13
  4. 4. Introductions n Personal introductions (University?; Role? One word goal? A favourite space?) n My background (University?; Role? One goal? A favourite space?) 4 4Tuesday, 8 October 13
  5. 5. What Trends and Challenges do we Need to Consider? 5Tuesday, 8 October 13
  6. 6. CSIRO Megatrends 6 On the move Personalisation IWorld 6Tuesday, 8 October 13
  7. 7. University of the Future n Democratisation of knowledge and access n Contestability of markets and funding n Digital technologies n Global mobility n Integration with industry 7 7Tuesday, 8 October 13
  8. 8. Horizon Report 8 8Tuesday, 8 October 13
  9. 9. Trends ‣ People expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. ‣ The abundance of resources and relationships will challenge our educational identity. ‣ Students want to use their own technology for learning. ‣ Shift across all sectors to online learning, hybrid learning and collaborative models. ‣ 9 9Tuesday, 8 October 13
  10. 10. Challenges n Seamless learning – people expect to be able to work, learn, and study whenever and wherever they want. n Digital literacies – capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society (JISC) n Personalisation - our learning, teaching, place of learning, technologies will be individualised n Digital scholarship will be the norm. 10 10Tuesday, 8 October 13
  11. 11. Spaces for Knowledge Generation 11Tuesday, 8 October 13
  12. 12. Spaces for Knowledge Generation n Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: n enhance learning n that motivate learners n promote authentic learning interactions n Spaces where both teachers and students optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space (Keppell & Riddle, 2012). 12 12Tuesday, 8 October 13
  13. 13. What Spaces are You Currently Using for Learning? 13Tuesday, 8 October 13
  14. 14. Distributed Learning Spaces 14Tuesday, 8 October 13
  15. 15. Distributed Spaces n Growing acceptance that learning occurs in different ‘places’ n Proliferation of approaches emerging including ‘flexible’, ‘open’, ‘distance’ and ‘off- campus’ that assist the ubiquity of learning in a wide range of contexts (Lea & Nicholl, 2002). n Growing acceptance of life-long and life- wide learning also have a major influence on distributed learning spaces. 15 15Tuesday, 8 October 13
  16. 16. Physical Virtual Formal Informal InformalFormal Blended Mobile Personal Outdoor Professional Practice Distributed Learning Spaces Academic 16 16Tuesday, 8 October 13
  17. 17. n Book Chapter: http:// www.slideshare.net/ mkeppell/distributed- spaces-for-learning Distributed Learning Spaces 17 17Tuesday, 8 October 13
  18. 18. Seamless Learning Continuity of learning across a combination of locations, times, technologies or social settings (Sharples, et al, 2012). 18Tuesday, 8 October 13
  19. 19. 19Tuesday, 8 October 13
  20. 20. http://www.skgproject.com 20Tuesday, 8 October 13
  21. 21. http://documents.skgproject.com/skg-final-report.pdf 21Tuesday, 8 October 13
  22. 22. Seven Principles of Learning Space Design n The SKG project has established seven principles of learning space design which support a collaborative and student-centred approach to learning: n Comfort: a space which creates a physical and mental sense of ease and well-being n Aesthetics: pleasure which includes the recognition of symmetry, harmony, simplicity and fitness for purpose n Flow: the state of mind felt by the learner when totally involved in the learning experience 22 22Tuesday, 8 October 13
  23. 23. Seven Principles of Learning Space Design •Equity: consideration of the needs of cultural and physical differences •Blending: a mixture of technological and face-to-face pedagogical resources •Affordances: the “action possibilities” the learning environment provides the users, including such things as kitchens, natural light, wifi, private spaces, writing surfaces, sofas, and so on. •Repurposing: the potential for multiple usage of a space (Souter, Riddle, Keppell, 2010) (http://www.skgproject.com) 23 23Tuesday, 8 October 13
  24. 24. Physical Learning Spaces 24Tuesday, 8 October 13
  25. 25. CSU Albury-Wodonga Learning commons 25Tuesday, 8 October 13
  26. 26. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing 26Tuesday, 8 October 13
  27. 27. Flow 27Tuesday, 8 October 13
  28. 28. Apple - Cupertino training Room 28Tuesday, 8 October 13
  29. 29. Wallenberg Hall - Stanford University 29Tuesday, 8 October 13
  30. 30. Affordances? - Blending 30Tuesday, 8 October 13
  31. 31. Discipline Pedagogies ‘Plasma to Chalkboard’ for Physics Professors Repurposing 31Tuesday, 8 October 13
  32. 32. MIT - STATA center - EDDY Spaces 32Tuesday, 8 October 13
  33. 33. Technology-enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) Centre Affordances - Blending 33Tuesday, 8 October 13
  34. 34. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing 34Tuesday, 8 October 13
  35. 35. Affordances 35Tuesday, 8 October 13
  36. 36. 36Tuesday, 8 October 13
  37. 37. Virtual Learning Spaces 37Tuesday, 8 October 13
  38. 38. Virtual Learning Spaces nVirtual learning spaces provide unique opportunities that are unavailable in physical learning spaces nThese affordances or ‘action possibilities’ allow a richer range of learning interactions 38 38Tuesday, 8 October 13
  39. 39. Virtual Learning Spaces Blending - Affordances - Equity? 39Tuesday, 8 October 13
  40. 40. Aesthetics Blending Affordances 40Tuesday, 8 October 13
  41. 41. Academic Learning Spaces 41Tuesday, 8 October 13
  42. 42. Barnett, R. (2011). Being a university. New York: Routledge. 42Tuesday, 8 October 13
  43. 43. Academic Learning Spaces Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: n enhance academic ‘work’ n that motivate academic ‘work’ n enable networking n Spaces where academics optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space. 43 43Tuesday, 8 October 13
  44. 44. Discursive Spaces n Intellectual and discursive spaces focus on the contribution to public discourse in areas such as: n e.g. presentations, media, advising, translating research into practical benefits, community involvement, etc n MOOCs? 44 44Tuesday, 8 October 13
  45. 45. Epistemological Spaces nEpistemological spaces focus on the “space available for academics to pursue their own research interests” (p. 76). ne.g. labs, libraries, collaborations and networking with university colleagues 45 45Tuesday, 8 October 13
  46. 46. Pedagogical and Curricular Spaces nPedagogical and curricular spaces focus on the spaces available to trial new pedagogical approaches and new curricular initiatives. ne.g. physical and virtual sandpits, working groups, meetings, etc nMOOCs? 46 46Tuesday, 8 October 13
  47. 47. 47Tuesday, 8 October 13
  48. 48. 48Tuesday, 8 October 13
  49. 49. Ontological Spaces n Ontological spaces focus on ‘academic being’ which is becoming increasingly multi-faceted beyond the research, teaching and community commitments. In fact “the widening of universities’ ontological spaces may bring both peril and liberation” (p. 77). n MOOCs? n e.g. diverse roles may include: academic staff developer, professional developer, manager, administrator, facilitator, teacher, researcher, evaluator, presenter, writer, editor, consultant, project manager, change agent and innovator. 49 49Tuesday, 8 October 13
  50. 50. Outdoor Learning Spaces 50Tuesday, 8 October 13
  51. 51. 51Tuesday, 8 October 13
  52. 52. Outdoor Learning Spaces These pathways, thoroughfares and occasional rest areas are generally given a functional value in traffic management and are more often than not developed as an after thought in campus design. As such the thoroughfares and rest areas are under valued (or not recognized) as important spaces for teaching and learning (Rafferty, 2012). 52Tuesday, 8 October 13
  53. 53. 53Tuesday, 8 October 13
  54. 54. 54Tuesday, 8 October 13
  55. 55. 55Tuesday, 8 October 13
  56. 56. Mobile Learning Spaces 56Tuesday, 8 October 13
  57. 57. Mobility n “Learning when mobile means that context becomes all-important since even a simple change of location is an invitation to revisit learning” (ALT-J Vol 17, No.3 p.159) 57 57Tuesday, 8 October 13
  58. 58. Mobile Learning Spaces n With its strong emphasis on learning rather than teaching, mobile learning challenges educators to try to understand learners’ needs. n Intersection of education, life, work and leisure” (Kukulska- Hulme, 2010, p.181). 58 58Tuesday, 8 October 13
  59. 59. Evaluating our Current Space 59Tuesday, 8 October 13
  60. 60. 60Tuesday, 8 October 13
  61. 61. 61Tuesday, 8 October 13
  62. 62. Personal Learning Spaces 62Tuesday, 8 October 13
  63. 63. Personal Learning Spaces ‣ Personal Learning Environments (PLE) integrate formal and informal learning spaces ‣ Customised by the individual to suit their needs and allow them to create their own identities. ‣ A PLE recognises ongoing learning and the need for tools to support life-long and life- wide learning. 63 63Tuesday, 8 October 13
  64. 64. 64Tuesday, 8 October 13
  65. 65. 65Tuesday, 8 October 13
  66. 66. 66Tuesday, 8 October 13
  67. 67. 67Tuesday, 8 October 13
  68. 68. Personal Learning Networks 68Tuesday, 8 October 13
  69. 69. 69Tuesday, 8 October 13
  70. 70. Connectivism ‣ Knowledge has changed to networks and ecologies (Siemens, 2006). ‣ Need improved lines of communication in networks. ‣ “Connectivism is the assertion that learning is primarily a network-forming process” (p. 15). 70 70Tuesday, 8 October 13
  71. 71. Affordances 71Tuesday, 8 October 13
  72. 72. Action Possibilities n Learning commons n Specific outdoor space n Your mobile phone n Your tablet/ipad n Virtual synchronous space n Virtual asynchronous space n Choose your own space 72 72Tuesday, 8 October 13
  73. 73. Conclusion n A global revolution is taking place in tertiary education. The traditional concept of the lecture room is being redefined as digital and distance education becomes the "new normal" (Mark Brown, Dominion Post). n It is time that we begin changing our thinking about the ‘place’ of learning for both learners and staff. n We need to let go of the tradition of universities as being a ‘singular place’ where learning and teaching occurs. n Distributed learning spaces are the future. 73 73Tuesday, 8 October 13
  74. 74. Access and Equity & Equivalence of Learning Outcomes ethical obligations Student Learning Experience traverses physical, blended and virtual learning spaces. ‘place’ of learning is diverse Constructive Alignment learning outcomes, subject, degree program, generic attributes Discipline Pedagogies specific needs of disciplines 74Tuesday, 8 October 13
  75. 75. 75 75Tuesday, 8 October 13
  76. 76. 76 76Tuesday, 8 October 13

×