Academic Learning Spaces

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  • Academic Learning Spaces

    1. 1. ‘ACADEMIC’ LEARNING SPACES IN A DISTRIBUTED LEARNING AND TEACHING ENVIRONMENT Professor Mike Keppell Director, The Flexible Learning Institute & Professor of Higher Education Charles Sturt University 1
    2. 2. OVERVIEWWhat type of university does an academic wishto work in?What is an academic learning space?What types of spaces do academics inhabit?Personal learning environmentsProfessional learning networksImplications for ‘new generation learningspaces’ 2
    3. 3. BEING A UNIVERSITYRESEARCH - TEACHING - COMMUNITY 3
    4. 4. ‘BEING A UNIVERSITY’Scientific University (research)Entrepreneurial University (unpredictable future)Bureaucratic University (means of organisng thecomplex entity)Corporate (objectives and policies are developedcentrally)Liquid Universities (involved in wide range of intellectualand business opportunities)Ecological University (Barnett, 2011) 4
    5. 5. ECOLOGICAL UNIVERSITYGlobal connectedness and dependence onworld around themInstead of ‘having an impact’ on the worldwhich can be both positive and negativeecological universities seek sustainabilityThey are self-sustainable in their multiplelevels of interactions.They adopt a ‘care for the world’ as opposedto an ‘impact on the world’ approach(Barnett, 2011). 5
    6. 6. ECOLOGICAL UNIVERSITYNetworked universityValues and fosters itsnetworks and theirinterconnectednessFeels a responsibility to thewell-being of thesenetworks (Barnett, 2011). 6
    7. 7. 7
    8. 8. ACADEMIC LEARNING SPACES Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: enhance academic ‘work’ that motivate academic ‘work’ enable networking Spaces where academics optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space. 8
    9. 9. Distributed Learning Spaces Physical Blended VirtualFormal Informal Formal Informal Mobile Personal Academic Professional Outdoor Practice 9
    10. 10. ACADEMIC SPACESBarnett (2011) suggests that “today’s universitylives amid multiple time-spans, and time-speeds” (p. 74).Constant email...Committee meetings......Historians who focus on the pastResearchers who may focus on the future 10
    11. 11. ACADEMIC SPACESUniversities may need tobe conscious of the 24/7existence of theirstudents across theglobe, each in their ownunique time-span.Virtual spacesResidential students 11
    12. 12. ACADEMIC SPACESBarnett (2011) suggests that academics may beactive in university spaces that may include:Intellectual and discursive space which focuson the contribution to the wider public sphere.e.g. presentations, media, advising, translatingresearch into practical benefits, communityinvolvement, etc 12
    13. 13. ACADEMIC SPACESEpistemological space which focuses on the“space available for academics to pursue theirown research interests” (p. 76).e.g. labs, libraries, with colleagues at otheruniversities, schools, etc 13
    14. 14. ACADEMIC SPACESPedagogical and curricular space focuseson the spaces available to trial newpedagogical approaches and new curricularinitiatives.e.g. physical and virtual sandpits, workinggroups, meetings, etc 14
    15. 15. ACADEMIC SPACESOntological space which focuses on ‘academicbeing’ which is becoming increasingly multi-facetedbeyond the research, teaching and communitycommitments. In fact “the widening of universities’ontological spaces may bring both peril andliberation” (p. 77).e.g. diverse roles may include: instructional designer,educational technologist, academic staff developer,professional developer, manager, administrator,facilitator, teacher, researcher, evaluator, presenter,writer, editor, consultant, project manager, changeagent and innovator. 15
    16. 16. PERSONAL LEARNING SPACESPersonal learning environments (PLE) integrateformal and informal learning spacesCustomised by the individual to suit their needsand allow them to create their own identities.A PLE recognises ongoing learning and theneed for tools to support life-long and life-widelearning. 16
    17. 17. CONNECTIVISMPLE may also require new ways of learning asknowledge has changed to networks andecologies (Siemens, 2006).The implications of this change is that improvedlines of communication need to occur.“Connectivism is the assertion that learning isprimarily a network-forming process” (p. 15). 17
    18. 18. 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. PRESENT OR FUTURE WEB 2.0 SPACES? 21
    22. 22. Professional Virtual Learning Spaces 22
    23. 23. 23
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. MOBILE LEARNING SPACES“Learning when mobile means that contextbecomes all-important since even a simplechange of location is an invitation to revisitlearning” (ALT-J Vol 17, No.3 p.159) 25
    26. 26. MOBILE LEARNING SPACES“With its strong emphasis on learning rather thanteaching, mobile learning challenges educatorsto try to understand learners’ needs,circumstances and abilities even better thanbefore. This extends to understanding howlearning takes place beyond the classroom, inthe course of daily routines, commuting andtravel, and in the intersection of education, life,work and leisure” (Kukulska-Hulme, 2010, p.181). 26
    27. 27. ‘NEW GENERATION LEARNING SPACES’ConnectivismNetworked academicsMobile academicsAcademics working in moredistributive spaces 27

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