2012 june eden_ls

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Workshop for EDEN conference - Porto

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2012 june eden_ls

  1. 1. DISTRIBUTED LEARNING SPACES IN OPEN LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS Professor Mike Keppell Director, The Flexible Learning Institute & Professor of Higher Education Charles Sturt University 1Thursday, 7 June 12 1
  2. 2. OVERVIEW Provide an overview of distributed learning spaces Examine seven principles of learning space design Explore affordances of learning spaces 2Thursday, 7 June 12 2
  3. 3. INTRODUCTIONS Personal introductions (University?; Role? One goal? Number of EDEN conferences attended?) My background (University?; Role? One goal? Number of EDEN conferences attended?) 3Thursday, 7 June 12 3
  4. 4. DISTRIBUTED SPACES Growing acceptance that learning occurs in different ‘places’ Proliferation of approaches emerging including ‘flexible’, ‘open’, ‘distance’ and ‘off-campus’ that assist the ubiquity of learning in a wide range of contexts (Lea & Nicholl, 2002). Growing acceptance of life-long and life-wide learning also have a major influence on distributed learning spaces. 4Thursday, 7 June 12 4
  5. 5. ASSUMPTIONS Universities value and seek to enhance the skills essential for lifelong and life wide learning, developing graduates who will continue to develop intellectually, professionally and socially beyond the bounds of formal education. Universities believe that programs, services and teaching methods should be responsive to the diverse cultural, social and academic needs of students, enabling them to adapt to the demands of university education and providing them with the cultural capital for life success. 5Thursday, 7 June 12 5
  6. 6. Barnett, R. (2011). Being a university. New York: Routledge. 6Thursday, 7 June 12 6
  7. 7. ECOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY Global connectedness and dependence on world around them Instead of ‘having an impact’ on the world which can be both positive and negative ecological universities seek sustainability They are self-sustainable in their multiple levels of interactions. They adopt a ‘care for the world’ as opposed to an ‘impact on the world’ approach (Barnett, 2011). 7Thursday, 7 June 12 7
  8. 8. HIGHER EDUCATION PRINCIPLES Access and Equity & Equivalence of Learning ethical obligations Outcomes traverses physical, blended Student Learning Experience and virtual learning spaces. ‘place’ of learning is diverse learning outcomes, subject, Constructive Alignment degree program, generic attributes Discipline Pedagogies specific needs of disciplines 8Thursday, 7 June 12 8
  9. 9. 9Thursday, 7 June 12 9
  10. 10. Key principle throughout the presentation is ‘design’ 10Thursday, 7 June 12 10
  11. 11. LEARNING SPACES 11Thursday, 7 June 12 11
  12. 12. LEARNING SPACES Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: enhance learning that motivate learners promote authentic learning interactions Spaces where both teachers and students optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space (Keppell & Riddle, 2012). 12Thursday, 7 June 12 12
  13. 13. QUESTION: IDENTIFY THREE WIDELY USED LEARNING SPACES THAT YOUR LEARNERS OR TEACHERS UTILISE 13Thursday, 7 June 12 13
  14. 14. Distributed Learning Spaces Physical Blended Virtual Formal Informal Formal Informal Mobile Personal Academic Professional Outdoor Practice 14Thursday, 7 June 12 14
  15. 15. PHYSICAL LEARNING SPACES 15Thursday, 7 June 12 15
  16. 16. 16Thursday, 7 June 12 16
  17. 17. SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING SPACE DESIGN The SKG project has established seven principles of learning space design which support a collaborative and student-centred  approach to learning: Comfort: a space which creates a physical and mental sense of ease and well-being Aesthetics: pleasure which includes the recognition of symmetry, harmony, simplicity and fitness for purpose Flow: the state of mind felt by the learner when totally involved in the learning experience 17Thursday, 7 June 12 17
  18. 18. SEVEN PRINCIPLES OF LEARNING SPACE DESIGN • Equity: consideration of the needs of cultural and physical differences • Blending: a mixture of technological and face-to-face pedagogical resources • Affordances: the “action possibilities” the learning environment provides the users, including such things as kitchens, natural light, wifi, private spaces, writing surfaces, sofas, and so on. • Repurposing: the potential for multiple usage of a space (Souter, Riddle, Keppell, 2010) (http://www.skgproject.com) 18Thursday, 7 June 12 18
  19. 19. ALBURY-WODONGA LEARNING COMMONS 19Thursday, 7 June 12 19
  20. 20. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing 20Thursday, 7 June 12 20
  21. 21. APPLE - CUPERTINO TRAINING ROOM 21Thursday, 7 June 12 21
  22. 22. WALLENBERG HALL - STANFORD UNIVERSITY 22Thursday, 7 June 12 22
  23. 23. Affordances? - Blending 23Thursday, 7 June 12 23
  24. 24. Comfort Aesthetics Flow Equity Blending Affordances Repurposing 24Thursday, 7 June 12 24
  25. 25. 25Thursday, 7 June 12 25
  26. 26. MIT - STATA CENTER - EDDY SPACES 26Thursday, 7 June 12 26
  27. 27. Technology-enhanced Active Learning (TEAL) Centre Affordances - Blending 27Thursday, 7 June 12 27
  28. 28. HARVARD UNIVERSITY 28Thursday, 7 June 12 28
  29. 29. Discipline Pedagogies ‘Plasma to Chalkboard’ for Physics Professors 29Thursday, 7 June 12 29
  30. 30. Affordances 30Thursday, 7 June 12 30
  31. 31. 31Thursday, 7 June 12 31
  32. 32. SEVEN PRINCIPLES - QUESTIONS http://mike-keppell.blogspot.co.nz/2012/04/questions-to- consider-in-learning-space.html 32Thursday, 7 June 12 32
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  36. 36. ACTIVITY: ANALYSE YOUR INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM OR VLE IN RELATION TO THE SEVEN PRINCIPLES 36Thursday, 7 June 12 36
  37. 37. VIRTUAL LEARNING SPACES 37Thursday, 7 June 12 37
  38. 38. VIRTUAL LEARNING SPACES Virtual learning spaces provide unique opportunities that are unavailable in physical learning spaces These affordances or ‘action possibilities’ allow a richer range of learning interactions 38Thursday, 7 June 12 38
  39. 39. Formal Virtual Informal Virtual Learning Spaces Learning Spaces 39Thursday, 7 June 12 39
  40. 40. VIRTUAL SPACES FLI Website: http://www.csu.edu.au/division/landt/flexible- learning/ FLI Blog: http://blendedandflexiblelearning.blogspot.com/ FLI Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/FLINews FLI Delicious: http://www.delicious.com/flexiblelearninginstitute Design: http://blendedandflexiblelearning.wikispaces.com/home FLI YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/FLIMedia Slidehare: http://www.slideshare.net/mkeppell 40Thursday, 7 June 12 40
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  42. 42. FACEBOOK Online and offline worlds are clearly coexisting Face-to-face friendships from home have been developed and sustained through continued online interactions Newer online relationships have flourished at university and developed into face-to-face indepth relationships” (Madge, Meek, Wellens and Hooley 2010, p. 145). 42Thursday, 7 June 12 42
  43. 43. BLENDED LEARNING SPACES 43Thursday, 7 June 12 43
  44. 44. FLEXIBLE LEARNING “Flexible learning” provides opportunities to improve the student learning experience through flexibility in time, pace, place (physical, virtual, on-campus, off-campus), mode of study (print- based, face-to-face, blended, online), teaching approach (collaborative, independent), forms of assessment and staffing. It may utilise a wide range of media, environments, learning spaces and technologies for learning and teaching. 44Thursday, 7 June 12 44
  45. 45. BLENDED & FLEXIBLE LEARNING “Blended and flexible learning” is a design approach that examines the relationships between flexible learning opportunities, in order to optimise student engagement and equivalence in learning outcomes regardless of mode of study (Keppell, 2010, p. 3). 45Thursday, 7 June 12 45
  46. 46. MOBILE LEARNING SPACES 46Thursday, 7 June 12 46
  47. 47. MOBILE LEARNING SPACES “Learning when mobile means that context becomes all-important since even a simple change of location is an invitation to revisit learning” (ALT-J Vol 17, No.3 p.159) 47Thursday, 7 June 12 47
  48. 48. MOBILE LEARNING SPACES With its strong emphasis on learning rather than teaching, mobile learning challenges educators to try to understand learners’ needs. Understanding how learning takes place beyond the classroom, and Intersection of education, life, work and leisure” (Kukulska-Hulme, 2010, p.181). 48Thursday, 7 June 12 48
  49. 49. QUESTION: WHAT ARE THE AFFORDANCES OR ACTION POSSIBILITIES OF MOBILE LEARNING SPACES? 49Thursday, 7 June 12 49
  50. 50. ACADEMIC LEARNING SPACES 50Thursday, 7 June 12 50
  51. 51. ACADEMIC LEARNING SPACES Physical, blended or virtual ‘areas’ that: enhance academic ‘work’ that motivate academic ‘work’ enable networking Spaces where academics optimize the perceived and actual affordances of the space. 51Thursday, 7 June 12 51
  52. 52. ACADEMIC SPACES Barnett (2011) suggests that “today’s university lives amid multiple time-spans, and time- speeds” (p. 74). Constant email... Committee meetings...... Historians who focus on the past Researchers who may focus on the future 52Thursday, 7 June 12 52
  53. 53. ACADEMIC SPACES Universities may need to be conscious of the 24/7 existence of their students across the globe, each in their own unique time-span. Virtual spaces Residential students 53Thursday, 7 June 12 53
  54. 54. ACADEMIC SPACES Barnett (2011) suggests that academics may be active in university spaces that may include: Intellectual and discursive space which focus on the contribution to the wider public sphere. Epistemological space which focuses on the “space available for academics to pursue their own research interests” (p. 76). 54Thursday, 7 June 12 54
  55. 55. ACADEMIC SPACES Pedagogical and curricular space focuses on the spaces available to trial new pedagogical approaches and new curricular initiatives. Ontological space which focuses on ‘academic being’ which is becoming increasingly multi-faceted beyond the research, teaching and community commitments. In fact “the widening of universities’ ontological spaces may bring both peril and liberation” (p. 77). 55Thursday, 7 June 12 55
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  61. 61. PERSONAL LEARNING SPACES 61Thursday, 7 June 12 61
  62. 62. PERSONAL LEARNING SPACES Personal learning environments (PLE) integrate formal and informal learning spaces Customised by the individual to suit their needs and allow them to create their own identities. A PLE recognises ongoing learning and the need for tools to support life-long and life-wide learning. 62Thursday, 7 June 12 62
  63. 63. CONNECTIVISM PLE may also require new ways of learning as knowledge has changed to networks and ecologies (Siemens, 2006). The implications of this change is that improved lines of communication need to occur. “Connectivism is the assertion that learning is primarily a network-forming process” (p. 15). 63Thursday, 7 June 12 63
  64. 64. 64Thursday, 7 June 12 64
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  68. 68. OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACES 68Thursday, 7 June 12 68
  69. 69. OUTDOOR LEARNING SPACES These pathways, thoroughfares and occasional rest areas are generally given a functional value in traffic management and are more often than not developed as an after thought in campus design. As such the thoroughfares and rest areas are under valued (or not recognized) as important spaces for teaching and learning (Rafferty, 2012). 69Thursday, 7 June 12 69
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  76. 76. Putting it all together 76Thursday, 7 June 12 76
  77. 77. CONCLUSION A global revolution is taking place in tertiary education. The traditional concept of the lecture room is being redefined as digital and distance education becomes the "new normal" (Mark Brown, Dominion Post). It is time that we begin changing our thinking about the ‘place’ of learning for both learners and staff. We need to let go of the tradition of universities as being a ‘singular place’ where learning and teaching occurs. Distributed learning spaces are the future. 77Thursday, 7 June 12 77
  78. 78. FURTHER INFORMATION SKG Report: http:// documents.skgproject.com/skg-final- report.pdf Book Chapter: http:// www.slideshare.net/mkeppell/ distributed-spaces-for-learning Mike’s Blog: http://mike- keppell.blogspot.com.au/ 78Thursday, 7 June 12 78
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