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SITE 2009 - Challenging Teachers’ Preconceptions, Misconceptions, and Concerns of Virtual Schooling
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SITE 2009 - Challenging Teachers’ Preconceptions, Misconceptions, and Concerns of Virtual Schooling

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Barbour, M. K., & Unger, K. (2009, March). Challenging teachers’ preconceptions, misconceptions, and concerns of virtual schooling. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Society for …

Barbour, M. K., & Unger, K. (2009, March). Challenging teachers’ preconceptions, misconceptions, and concerns of virtual schooling. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, Charleston, SC.

This study examined the perceptions of graduate students in an instructional technology course related to K-12 online learning based upon their completion of the Teacher Education Goes into Virtual Schooling (TEGIVS) curriculum. The TEGIVS program was created through a grant funded initiative at Iowa State University. Nine graduate students at a large, state-funded, mid-Western university completed this curriculum as a part of their Internet in the Classroom course. Based upon our initial analysis, the TEGIVS curriculum was effective for providing these graduate students with some experience with how K-12 online learning opportunities are delivered, along with some of the possibilities and challenges associated with these opportunities. The analysis of this data is continuing, and there are plans to continue this line of inquiry with additional students in future offerings of this course.

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  • First initial effort to address the gap by Iowa State UniversityOther schools: University of Florida, Boise State, and Plymouth, Queens University, University of Central Florida, Jacksonville StateRationale for online environmentDescription of CourseDiscussion of ToolsSyllabi; Materials; Activities; Assessment Examples
  • Introduction to Web 2.0 toolsTEGIVS Scenarios Included:Technology, Pedagogy, Assessment, and ManagementDemonstrate Various Approaches to Online LearningShowcased Online ToolsExamples of Assessment in Online LearningManagement IssuesConstant Comparative Coding of their blogs postings and comments
  • BenefitsCustomized InstructionEasily Adapt to Curriculum ChangesFlexibilityConsistent with the demands placed on teacher’s timeDrawbacksIncreased TrainingMore ResponsibilityPrep Time
  • primarily due to the perceived ability of online learning to increase learning and engagementViewed VS in Positive manner for students
  • Lack of information to stakeholdersLack of Administrative Support
  • Stakeholders not equipped with the knowledge to supportWhen provided materialsMore skills to begin utilizing
  • Transcript

    • 1. Michael Barbour Kelly UngerWayne State University
    • 2.  Increasing US  To date there has been enrollment little in the way of teacher education on Michigan, New Mexico, virtual school or online Alabama requiring teaching and learning online experience pedagogy (Smith, Clark & Blomeyer, 2005) Florida districts must provide students online learning opportunities
    • 3.  Limited Existing Resources through various universities Iowa State University1. Good Practice to Inform Iowa Online Learning2. Teacher Education Goes Into Virtual Schools http://ctlt.iastate.edu/~tegivs/TEGIVS/homepage.html
    • 4.  Fall 2008 – Wayne State University - Internet in the Classroom. Final 5 – 6 Weeks of Course  Materials:  5 TEGIVS Scenarios  K-12 Online Learning Readings  Reflective Blogging Discussions 9 Volunteer Graduate Students
    • 5. 1. Affects on K-12 Teachers2. Affects on K-12 Students3. Why VS are unsuccessful at the K-12 level4. Making VS successful at the K-12 level
    • 6.  Benefits  “online courses would serve as a way of freedom for teachers…it gives teachers the ability to design and deliver a course that will fit the students learning patterns and interests” Drawbacks  “Training burnt out teachers”  “there would be a lot more work because of the setup and keeping track of students,”
    • 7.  Populations  HS and MS  Dropouts  Alternative Education Benefits  Various Entry Points  More Alternatives Drawback  Interaction
    • 8.  “I never ever hear anything at school about virtual schooling. It is not mentioned in workshops or at meetings. I doubt very many teachers are even aware of its possibilities. Or its existence”
    • 9.  “without well-trained, qualified teachers to facilitate online instruction, virtual schooling will be ineffective as an educational model” Educate Stakeholders Access to Proper Technology Train Students On-site Coach
    • 10. Research Application Lack of Knowledge  Refinement of Current Materials Teachers Perceive Benefit for Students  Creation and Evaluation Eager for More of MI Based Materials
    • 11. Michael Barbourmkbarbour@gmail.com Kelly Ungerkellyunger@wayne.edu