E-Learn 2007 - Making Sense of Video Games: Pre-Service Teachers Struggle with This New Medium

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Barbour, M. K., Kinsella, J. & Rieber, L. P. (2007, October). PowerPoint games in K-12 e-learning environments . Paper presentation at the annual World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare and Higher Education, Quebec City , QC.

This next generation of students have had exposure to digital media far more than any previous generation, particularly video games. Almost daily, news outlets report the latest news on the evils of video games, how much children are playing video games, the potential of video games, and the list just goes on. In this presentation, the researchers explore how pre-service teachers make sense of a commercially purchased video games and its role in classroom teaching.

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E-Learn 2007 - Making Sense of Video Games: Pre-Service Teachers Struggle with This New Medium

  1. 1. Making Sense of Video Games:Pre-Service Teachers Struggle with This New Medium Medium Mark Austin Evans University of Georgia maevans@uga.edu Michael K. Barbour Wayne State University mkbarbour@gmail.com
  2. 2. Video Games are Popular"spent fewer than 5,000hours of their lives reading,but often more than 10,000hours playing video games"(Prensky, 2006)
  3. 3. Simulations & Gaming in Social Studies 21 students ed and non-ed majors major projects playing video games
  4. 4. Reaction PapersThe purpose of the reaction paper is twofold. The firstis to provide an opportunity for you to reflectivejournal your journey through the video game that youpurchased. The second is to reflect on your ownexperiences playing your game. You should try andrelate your experience to the literature that you arereading, the discussions that we are having in classand on WebCT, and how does or could yourexperiences or your game relate to a social studiesclassroom. When you relate your experiences to thesethings, try to be specific.
  5. 5. Reaction PapersWhy did you select the particular game that you purchased? What are yourfirst impressions of playing the game?While Gillespie isnt talking about video games, is anything she says relevantto your own game play? Rieber talks about how play can be a powerfullearning experience, what have you learned about your game?What have you learned about the story or narrative of your game? In yourK-12 experience, do you ever recall playing a game in school? If so, whatlessons did you learn from it?Under "Simulation and Gaming Resources" go to the "Grading theEducational Value of Popular Video Games" and search for you game.Do you agree with the comments made in this review? Why or why not? Ifyou game hasnt been reviewed, click on "Game Ratings" and select"Understanding the Ratings". Using these categories, how would you rate yourgame?
  6. 6. Reaction PapersHave someone of the opposite gender, not in this class, play yourgame for at least one (1) hour. Based on your reading of Dickeyand that persons experiences, how is your game perceived by theopposite gender?Based on your reading of Gee and your own game play experience,have you experienced the things that Gee has described? Explain.Squires completed his Ph.D. dissertation on using Civilization inmiddle school and high school history classrooms; can your game beused in a social studies classroom? If so, how? If not, why not? Bespecific and use both the state-wide standards and the NationalCouncil of Social Studies standards in your discussion.
  7. 7. Methodologyopen codingRuona (2004)
  8. 8. Initial Resultsidentify content within their video gamesthat was consistent with the standardsthese future teachers had difficult inidentifying opportunities where thoseconnections could be used in their futureclassrooms
  9. 9. Initial Resultsthe four female undergraduate studentswere able to make more and morecreative connections between the contentof their video games and the standards
  10. 10. So What?Kids are playing video gamesKids seem different and seem to learndifferently todayKnowledge of video games is simplyanother schema that teachers can drawupon
  11. 11. Making Sense of Video Games:Pre-Service Teachers Struggle with This New Medium Medium Mark Austin Evans University of Georgia maevans@uga.edu Michael K. Barbour Wayne State University mkbarbour@gmail.com

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