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CSSE 2013 - Voracious Appetite of Online Teaching: Examining Labour Issues Related to K-12 Online Learning
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CSSE 2013 - Voracious Appetite of Online Teaching: Examining Labour Issues Related to K-12 Online Learning

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Barbour, M. K., Kuehn, L., & Adelstein, D. (2013, June). Voracious appetite of online teaching: Examining labour issues related to K-12 online learning. A paper presented at the annual Canadian ...

Barbour, M. K., Kuehn, L., & Adelstein, D. (2013, June). Voracious appetite of online teaching: Examining labour issues related to K-12 online learning. A paper presented at the annual Canadian Society for the Study of Education conference, Waterloo, ON.

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  • This study was funded by the British Columbia Teachers Federation
  • The study that was funded by the BCTF focused on two areas.
  • This presentation focuses on the second of those two areas.
  • The vast majority of distance education programs are housed within the public school system, and as such they are subject to the same rules as classroom-based education. The main exceptions to this are online private schools in Ontario (where students have to pay full tuition) and British Columbia (where the Ministry pays a significant percentage of the FTE).Unions in Canada have been cautiously supportive. They recognize that this medium can provide a quality education and opportunity for students that may not otherwise have access to it, but are still unsure what equivalent workloads and quality of life issues look like for distance teachers.
  • In the supplemental environment, teachers are hired on contract and, depending on the particular program, teachers may have some benefits (but are considered contract and not full-time employees). Teachers unions have been generally favourably towards these supplemental programs, as the teachers are generally union members - although not necessarily unionized (i.e., a unionized classroom teacher accepts a contract to teach an online course in addition to their regular classroom job); and the working conditions are often similar to the face-to-face environment.In the full-time model, teachers are hired under conditions that we would expect to find in private schools in Canada. Few have benefits or job security or union representation. In some states, charter school teachers do not even have to be certified by the state. Charter schools and, in particular, online charter schools are seen by many in the United States – specifically those pursuing a neo-liberal agenda of educational reform – as a way to removing union influence from the public education system (i.e., union busting). It is the full-time model that is growing the most rapidly, often due to favourable legislative changes made by neo-liberal and conservative allies of the corporations profiting from this free market model of public education (generally following intense lobbying).

CSSE 2013 - Voracious Appetite of Online Teaching: Examining Labour Issues Related to K-12 Online Learning CSSE 2013 - Voracious Appetite of Online Teaching: Examining Labour Issues Related to K-12 Online Learning Presentation Transcript

  • Michael BarbourWayne State UniversityLarry KuehnBritish Columbia Teachers FederationDavid AdelsteinWayne State University
  • 1. How does teaching in a distance or onlineenvironment compare with teaching in atraditional classroom environment?2. What is the relationship of teachers’unions with K-12 online learning inCanada, the United States and othercountries within the context of eachjurisdiction?
  • 1. How does teaching in a distance or onlineenvironment compare with teaching in atraditional classroom environment?2. What is the relationship of teachers’unions with K-12 online learning inCanada, the United States and othercountries within the context of eachjurisdiction?
  •  distance and online learning generallyoccurs within the traditional publicschool systemo exceptions include online private schools inOntario and British Columbia• generally speaking, unions have beensupportiveo but cautious as unions try to understand whatteaching in these environments means for theirmembers
  • Newfoundland and Labrador union partners with K-12 online learning program toprovide online professional development centerOntario Ontario Secondary School Teachers’ Federation passesmultiple resolutions supporting online learning prepares brief about online teacher working conditionsfor locals to use in collective bargainingAlberta commissioned several studies examining online teachersupport, preparation, and workload conditions
  • Nova Scotia eleven provisions related to distance teaching incollective agreement focused on:o ensuring that distance education teachers have comparableworkloads to their face-to-face counterpartso adequate and regular training to teach in the distance educationenvironmento input on the future development of K-12 distance education in theprovinceBritish Columbia have commissioned numerous studies and researchbriefs into distance education (beginning in 2002) established an Educators for Distributed LearningProvincial Specialist Association
  •  supplemental online programs are districtor state-based and fundedo teachers contracted to teach• full-time programs are generally createdunder charter school legislationo teachers are not unionized, paid less thantraditional public school teachers, and – in certainjurisdictions – do not have to be certified
  • Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Learners Online is the only unionized cyber charterschool in the United States contract similar to brick-and-mortar contracts, with some differencesin appropriate areas (e.g., required hours and work site)Wisconsin Wisconsin Education Association Council (WEAC) led a court battleto close cyber charter schools for violating state law for enrolling non-residential students, taking money away from other school districts,and utilizing uncertified teachers WEAC won, forcing changes to state’s cyber charter legislationCalifornia California division of the American Teachers Federation initiallycalled for an outright ban of online courses union later reached a compromise that would see the two sides meetif there were any changes made to the employment conditions
  • Brazil teachers’ unions believes that distance learning leads toanti-social behavior, as face-to-face interaction wasremoved from the education experience took the position that all education should be deliveredin traditional, face-to-face formatsNew Zealand Post Primary Teachers’ Association (PPTA) active inproviding input into a variety of e-learning initiativesfrom the Government supportive of potential opportunities offered bydistance education, but concerned about issues ofaccess and teacher workload
  • Michael K. Barbourmkbarbour@gmail.comLarry Kuehnlkuehn@bctf.caDavid Adelsteindave.adelstein@gmail.comReport available at:http://www.bctf.ca/uploadedFiles/Public/Issues/Technology/VoraciousAppetite.pdf