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Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?
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Bridgewater Academy - Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates In An Asynchronous Environment?

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Barbour, M. K. (2013, January). Strategies to improve student completion rates in an asynchronous environment?. An invited presentation to Bridgewater Academy, Rock Rapids, IA.

Barbour, M. K. (2013, January). Strategies to improve student completion rates in an asynchronous environment?. An invited presentation to Bridgewater Academy, Rock Rapids, IA.

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  • 1. Strategies to Improve Student Completion Rates in an Asynchronous Environment? Michael K. Barbour Assistant Professor Wayne State University
  • 2. Strategies• Predicting success and remediating weaknesses• Using the data available to you• Collaborating with school-based colleagues
  • 3. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• "help predict which high school students would be likely to succeed in online courses and provide a basis for counseling and support for other students interested in becoming online learners to help them become more successful" (Roblyer & Marshall, 2002-2003, p. 241)
  • 4. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• reliability level of 0.92 with a sample of 135 online learning students (Roblyer & Marshall, 2002-2003)• reliability level of 0.92with a sample of 4100 online learning students (Roblyer, Davis, Mills, Marshall & Pape, 2008)
  • 5. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• 20 question instrument• Focuses upon: 1. access to and expertise with computer 2. organization and self-regulation 3. beliefs about achievement 4. responsibility, and 5. risk-taking
  • 6. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• 20 question instrument• Focuses upon: 1. access to and expertise with computer 2. organization and self-regulation 3. beliefs about achievement 4. responsibility, and 5. risk-taking
  • 7. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• Access to and expertise with computers – To take advantage of virtual school courses, students usually find it helpful to have a computer at home and possess better-than-average computer skills. However, studies have shown that less affluent students are not as likely to have computers at home. As a result, more affluent students are showing up in greater numbers in virtual school enrollments.• Organization and self-regulation – Successful online students are able to organize their time and regulate their own learning in the relatively unstructured environments of online courses. Although virtual teachers frequently build in checks and prompts to remind and encourage students to keep up with courses tasks, students who do best are already so organized and motivated that they need fewer or no such prompts.
  • 8. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• Beliefs about achievement – Studies indicate that students who do best online have a strong need to achieve and have confidence in their ability to tackle new topics and use new strategies. Online courses represent new and unfamiliar territory, but successful students are not intimidated by this novel setting.• Responsibility – Successful online students seem to be those who realize that their success lies in their own hands. They also know that the source of failure is usually not the teacher, course organization, or other factors. They accept responsibility for finding ways to be successful. When they do less well than they had hoped, they seek out information to improve their performance. This ability relates to a quality sometimes referred to in the educational psychology literature as having "internal locus of control."
  • 9. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• Risk-taking – Communication in virtual environments is primarily written, and assigned tasks may have varying degrees of clarity. Students have to be willing to proceed in the midst of ambiguity and be prepared to do "course corrections" as needed. (Roblyer, 2005, ¶ 6)
  • 10. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• The problem with the ESPRI was that the instrument was simply a prediction instrument.• An online learning program is able to predict that a student will get a C or a F in a course with reasonable (90%+) certainty, then what?
  • 11. Educational Success Prediction Instrument (ESPRI)• The problem with the ESPRI was that the instrument was simply a prediction instrument.• An online learning program is able to predict that a student will get a C or a F in a course with reasonable (90%+) certainty, then what?
  • 12. Data Analytics
  • 13. Data Analytics
  • 14. Data Analytics
  • 15. Data AnalyticsToward a Deeper Understanding of StudentPerformance in Virtual High School Courses: Using Quantitative Analyses and Data Visualization to Inform Decision Making by Patrick Dickson
  • 16. Data Analytics• More clicks = higher grade• Early participation = success• Regular participation = success• Non-traditional time participation = success
  • 17. Data Analytics• Using trends to prompt or motivate students• Using historical data to prompt or motivate students• Understanding individual course trends
  • 18. School-Based Personnel• teachers at the school level provided substantial levels of support in a wide range of areas, including supervisory and administrative duties, technical troubleshooting, and providing content-based assistance (Barbour & Mulcahy, 2004)• the amount of time these school-based teachers spent supporting the students engaged in online learning had actually increased over the past five years and, as students with a wider range of abilities are enrolling in online courses, the local school-based teachers have to spend more time monitoring students’ progress and assisting the academically weaker students (Barbour & Mulcahy, 2009)• school-based teachers “directly working with students day by day [were] key to the success of the [K-12 online learning] program” (Roblyer, Freeman, Stabler, & Schneidmiller, 2007, p. 11)
  • 19. School-Based PersonnelProvide training or coaching for the school-basedfacilitators on topics including: – first day of school – how to talk about and support online assignments – potential student fears – helping to develop time management skill – assisting with the problem of too much work – what to do when students become disengaged – how to ease students who are worried about their grades (Irvin, Hannum, Farmer, de la Varre, & Keane, 2009)
  • 20. School-Based Personnel• effective school-based facilitators had“a good, working relationship, who were consistently responsive in their interactions with the teacher, and engaged with and interested in their students” (de la Varre, Keane, & Irvin, 2010, pp. 202–203)
  • 21. School-Based Personnel• the school-based facilitator should undertake some of the functions that project teacher presence – instructional design and organization – direct instruction – facilitating discourse (de la Varre, Keane, & Irvin, 2011).
  • 22. YourQuestions andComments
  • 23. Assistant Professor Wayne State University, USA mkbarbour@gmail.comhttp://www.michaelbarbour.com

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