Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Wordpress as a CMS
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Wordpress as a CMS

6,298

Published on

Presentation given at the Colorado Springs Open Source Meetup January 2009 meeting.

Presentation given at the Colorado Springs Open Source Meetup January 2009 meeting.

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
6,298
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
150
Comments
0
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Let's talk about WordPress as a CMS What is a CMS? CMS = Content Management System Tools that provide a workflow for publishing collaborative content for multiple users. * Examples: * Drupal: php / MySQL * Joomla: php / MySQL * Xoops: php / MySQL * Plone: python / various DBs WordPress * open source CMS * originally focused on blogging * but has evolved far beyond those humble beginnings
  • Transcript

    • 1. WordPress as a CMS Michael J. Hammel http://www.graphics-muse.org [email_address]
    • 2. Credits Shamefully stolen from Beyond a Blog By Jamie Oastler WordCamp Toronto 2008 Icons from Crystal Clear collection at Wikimedia Commons
    • 3. Highlights
        The Blue Pill
      • Introduction
      • 4. The Power of the Platform
      • 5. Anatomy of a theme
      • 6. Plugins
        The Red Pill
      • Wordpress-as-CMS
      • 7. What can WordPress do?
      • 8. Where do we go from here?
    • 9. Power of the Platform
        Downloads
      • 11.1 million by Oct 2008
      • 10. 1.3 million since Dec 2009 (2.7 release)
      • 11. 1100 changes to repository
      • 12. 3000+ registered plugins
    • 13. Power of the Platform
      • Fast / Easy Installation
      • 14. Hierarchical data structure (categories, pages, etc.)
      • 15. User Roles
      • 16. Content Approval / publishing workflow
      • 17. Content Versioning
      • Customizable presentation layer
      • 18. Comment system
      • 19. Canonical URLs
      • 20. Support for RSS, SSL
        Out of box functionality
    • 21. Power of the Platform
        Open Source
      • Community Built
      • 22. Community Driven
      • 23. PHP backbone
      • 24. MySQL backend
    • 25. Power of the Platform
        Modularity
      • Themes
      • 26. Plugins
      • 27. Filters: database or display pipelines
      • 28. Actions: event or code-location based
      • 29. WordpressMU: multiuser version
    • 30. Power of the Platform “ WordPress was always designed as a simple CMS for people smart enough to not get mired in the things the CMSes usually get mired in.” Matt Mullenweg
    • 31. Themes
      • Templates
      • 32. “ Template files are the building blocks of your WordPress site. They fit together like the pieces of a puzzle to generate the web pages on your site. Some templates (the header and footer template files for example) are used on all the web pages, while others are used only under specific conditions.” - Stepping into Templates (Codex)
      • 33. Themes Directory - /wp-content/themes
    • 34. Anatomy of a theme Theme File Usage 404.php Invalid URL requests will be served this page archive.php Display template for posts without category styling category.php Display template for categories requests comments.php Included inside display templates to display comments and allow users to add new comments to a post / page. footer.php Put your analytics code here! functions.php A container for functions called in other themes files header.php <head> </head> and usually top-navigation index.php Primary and possibly only page Start simple, design iteratively http://wpcandy.com/articles/the-WordPress-starter-theme-project.html
    • 35. Anatomy of a theme The volume and types of files in any theme will be based on the complexity / variety of designs and the skill of the author to implement those styles. Theme File Usage page.php Display template for pages (non-blog) searchform.php <?php include(TEMPLATEPATH.'/searchform.php');?> sidebar.php Navigation or code included in other display templates. Can be managed through admin via widgets - http://automattic.com/code/widgets/themes/ single.php Display template for individual blog posts style.css Primary css stylesheet [Javascript] Sub-folder index.php Primary and possibly only page
    • 36. Anatomy of a theme
        Make Your Own
      • Less cost / more time
      • 37. More coding / less customization (maybe)
      • 38. Self Sufficient: DIYers
        Acquire / Customize
      • Less time / more cost (potentially)
      • 39. Less coding, more customization
      Starting Points http://www.wordpress.org http://www.wordcamptoronto.com http://vibr8bros.com/Wordpress-project http://weblogtoolscollection.com http://themestation.com Starting Points http://www.wordpress.com/extend/themes http://www.templatemonster.com http://woothemes.com http://www.wPremix.com http://www.revolutoinstheme.com http://www.themeforest.net
    • 40. Plugins
      • Good / Bad / Ugly: choose with caution
      • 41. Read code / comments
      • 42. Backups!!!
      • 43. Experiment: Dev Server
        • scp plugindir `pwd`
      • Share your experiences!
      http://weblogtoolscollection.com
    • 44. Plugins
        Manual Install
      • Download, unzip, upload, activate, integrate, test
      • 45. More control of process
      • 46. More secure
        Development Documentation
      • WordPress Help Sheet and Advanced Version
      • 47. WordPress Snippets
      • 48. WordPress Reference
        Automatic Install
      • Requires FTP
      • 49. Use ssh / dev server instead
        Impact
      • Cross browser implications
      • 50. Cross plugin compatibility
    • 51. Plugins
        Standard Plugins
      • Akismet
      • 52. WordPress.com Stats
      • 53. WP-Print
      • 54. WP Super Edit
      • 55. Google XML Sitemaps
      • 56. Maintenance Mode
      • 57. WordPress Database Backup
      • 58. WP-Cache or WP Super Cache – high volume (Slashdot effect)
      • 59. NextGen Gallery
    • 60. WordPress as a CMS
      • What does this mean?
      • 61. Go beyond blogs
      • 62. Provide Publishing Workflow
      • 63. Multiple Users
    • 64. What can WordPress do?
        Basic Content
      • Blogs: http://scobleizer.com/
      • 65. Magazines: http://wphacks.com/best-magazine-style-wordpress-themes/
      • 66. Portals: http://cnnpolitics.com/
      • 67. Tutorials: http://psdtuts.com/
      • 68. Subscription based content
      • 69. AJAX: http://wordpress.org/extend/plugins/ajaxd-wordpress/
      • 70. GPS / Google Maps
      • 71. Auctions / eCommerce: paypal, google checkouts
      • 72. Mailing lists, Contact Managers, CRM
      • 73. Role Management: http://agapetry.net/news/introducing-role-scoper/
      • 74. Events / Calendars
    • 75. What can WordPress do? Website / App Plugin Social Media Everything Share This Social Traffic Monitor Social Homes Facebook Wordbook Twitter Twitpress SimpleTwitter StumbleUpon Stumble Reviews Stumble Digest Ping.FM WPing.FM Flickr PhotoXhibit OpenID SimpleOpenID Amazon S3 TanTan S3
        External Integration
    • 76. What can WordPress do?
        Galleries
      • NextGen
      • 77. flShow Manager
      • 78. Post Thumb
      • 79. Custom Fields + LightBox2
    • 80. What can WordPress do?
        Podcasting
      • PodPress
      • 81. Blubrry Powerpress
      • 82. CaveMonkey50.com
      • 83. Attach mp3 to post!
    • 84. What can WordPress do?
        Language Support
      • Multiple languages supported (see Codex )
      • 85. Plugins for translating data
    • 88. WordPress in Use
      • WebAppers – Open Source for Web developers
      • 89. Web Designer Depot
      • 90. Tech Republic
      • 91. ZDNet News
      • 92. Reuters Blogs
      • Anderson Cooper 360
      • 93. Andy Roddick
      • 94. Ford Auto Shows
      • 95. Simms Furniture
      • 96. The Thunderbird – Univ. Journalism Dept. magazine
    • 97. Summary
        What's Good
      • Start simple
      • 98. Plugins as modular extensions
      • 99. Stock themes to custom themes
        What's Missing
      • Better stock user management
      • 100. Um...that's it!
    • 101. Where to go from here
    • 107. Where to go from here
        WordCamp Denver 2009
      • Denver Art Museum
      • 108. Saturday, February 28 th
      • 109. 9:30 – 5 (schedule TBD)
      • 110. Registration: http://denver.wordcamp.org/register/
    • 111. An InteractiveTour

    ×