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Integrate Social Media into Your Communication Strategy
 

Integrate Social Media into Your Communication Strategy

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Slides from our presentation to DVSAE members on June 23, 2009.

Slides from our presentation to DVSAE members on June 23, 2009.

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  • Hello and Thank you for inviting us to present our response to Frank’s un-RFP. Find out who’s on the call, and their role in the MMS.
  • Our approach always starts with listening. In the short-term, this is how you’re finding your champions and stakeholders who are already online. Looking ahead, a strong social media monitoring program will be really important, especially for brand and reputation management. You can see from this slide that every part of our approach is informed by listening. So then, the strategy development becomes essential. You guys already know a lot about your stakeholders from the social technographics research you’ve done. You also know from experimentation what’s worked and what hasn’t. We’ll lay it all out and see where we stand and where we want to go from here. Then, everything else is based on that strategy. We generally launch something, feed and nurture it to see if it will take root on its own, evaluate how it’s going, then tweak the strategy according to what we’ve learned. From the slide, it looks like you can do all of this in a week – but it takes time. You could make it around the circle in 6 months, or it could take a year or more. It’s a journey.
  • Now, in your un-RFP, you identified three focus areas. We’re very well-versed in membership, education, and advocacy from our association training. Of course, there is some overlap, yes?
  • On the left of this slide, we’ve tried to visualize that overlap. Hopefully, those darker places create more buzz among your members and stakeholders, too. On the right of this slide, we’ve tried to visualize what social media is really good for. The outer ring, conversation, that’s the easiest to energize. Collaboration is harder, and collective action is perhaps the trickiest. So it makes sense to choose your battles wisely. Remember, we want to be efficient here.
  • When superimpose these two images together, you get an idea of how your focus might jive with what social media is good for. You can also see how it’s all going to have to work together for you to achieve the more inspired benefits of social media.
  • Our approach always starts with listening. In the short-term, this is how you’re finding your champions and stakeholders who are already online. Looking ahead, a strong social media monitoring program will be really important, especially for brand and reputation management. You can see from this slide that every part of our approach is informed by listening. So then, the strategy development becomes essential. You guys already know a lot about your stakeholders from the social technographics research you’ve done. You also know from experimentation what’s worked and what hasn’t. We’ll lay it all out and see where we stand and where we want to go from here. Then, everything else is based on that strategy. We generally launch something, feed and nurture it to see if it will take root on its own, evaluate how it’s going, then tweak the strategy according to what we’ve learned. From the slide, it looks like you can do all of this in a week – but it takes time. You could make it around the circle in 6 months, or it could take a year or more. It’s a journey.
  • We won’t spend a lot of time on this slide, but it begins to show how multi-faceted this process can be. There’s a lot to consider, and your content strategy needs to be flexible enough to feed any and all of these different facets of the social web. I’m gonna go out on a limb and guess that you guys have everything you need for all of this already, it’s just a matter of a few tweaks here and there.
  • Our approach always starts with listening. In the short-term, this is how you’re finding your champions and stakeholders who are already online. Looking ahead, a strong social media monitoring program will be really important, especially for brand and reputation management. You can see from this slide that every part of our approach is informed by listening. So then, the strategy development becomes essential. You guys already know a lot about your stakeholders from the social technographics research you’ve done. You also know from experimentation what’s worked and what hasn’t. We’ll lay it all out and see where we stand and where we want to go from here. Then, everything else is based on that strategy. We generally launch something, feed and nurture it to see if it will take root on its own, evaluate how it’s going, then tweak the strategy according to what we’ve learned. From the slide, it looks like you can do all of this in a week – but it takes time. You could make it around the circle in 6 months, or it could take a year or more. It’s a journey.
  • Our approach always starts with listening. In the short-term, this is how you’re finding your champions and stakeholders who are already online. Looking ahead, a strong social media monitoring program will be really important, especially for brand and reputation management. You can see from this slide that every part of our approach is informed by listening. So then, the strategy development becomes essential. You guys already know a lot about your stakeholders from the social technographics research you’ve done. You also know from experimentation what’s worked and what hasn’t. We’ll lay it all out and see where we stand and where we want to go from here. Then, everything else is based on that strategy. We generally launch something, feed and nurture it to see if it will take root on its own, evaluate how it’s going, then tweak the strategy according to what we’ve learned. From the slide, it looks like you can do all of this in a week – but it takes time. You could make it around the circle in 6 months, or it could take a year or more. It’s a journey.
  • We have a few case studies that relate to the business objectives that you’re trying to achieve. The first is our client, ASAE & The Center. They, too, want to increase member activity. Specifically, as it relates to their volunteer community. Now these screenshots are from their current website. The work we’re doing with them has not launched yet, but it will in a couple weeks, so we thought it would be a chance for you to see, first-hand, what we’ve been up to. We’ve worked to help them think of volunteer opportunities as social objects. Now what do you do with a social object? You create it, share it, tag it, save it, discuss it…We also emphasized the idea of creating the simplest thing that could possibly work, and starting there. We haven’t been able to measure anything yet, but we have worked with ASAE to help them identify what the key success metrics will be, so that’s what you see here.
  • Another part of your un-RFP had to do with integrating traditional media with social media. You definitely want it all to go together. I hope you like metaphors… We see traditional media as the rock, the land, solid and important, but not fluid. Digital media, on the other hand, flows like water. And that flow will, overtime, shape the rock. Finally, social media is the clouds, picking up the water and carrying it wherever they go until they let it fall as rain.
  • Another part of your un-RFP had to do with integrating traditional media with social media. You definitely want it all to go together. I hope you like metaphors… We see traditional media as the rock, the land, solid and important, but not fluid. Digital media, on the other hand, flows like water. And that flow will, overtime, shape the rock. Finally, social media is the clouds, picking up the water and carrying it wherever they go until they let it fall as rain.
  • Now, when you talk about achieving better business results, this is the hardest to measure, obviously. It’s also the thing that takes the most time. That’s why we’re presenting a project we’ve been working on since before we formed our company. YAP is the Young Association Professionals online community that Maddie and I launched along with a small group of friends involved with ASAE. We started as a FB group, and started spreading to a bunch of different outposts, those squares you see in the slide. Then we launched our homebase site and have seen tremendous growth. We can point to people who have attended ASAE conferences, even joined or renewed their ASAE membership because of the conversations happening in YAP. We’ve gotten sponsorship money and great turnout for the events we hold. We’ve also got a great sense of the types of content that our members respond to. There’s a lot of untapped business potential there. It just goes to show how an experiment can start from a seed and grow into something really vital.
  • Another part of your un-RFP had to do with integrating traditional media with social media. You definitely want it all to go together. I hope you like metaphors… We see traditional media as the rock, the land, solid and important, but not fluid. Digital media, on the other hand, flows like water. And that flow will, overtime, shape the rock. Finally, social media is the clouds, picking up the water and carrying it wherever they go until they let it fall as rain.
  • The next case study is a client of ours who was looking for more influence as well as more member activity. The National Association for the Self-Employed has a membership model that is centered on health insurance and affinity programs. They have 250,000 members, but when we first started working with them, they were not at all plugged in to the online community of self-employeds and freelancers. We’ve gotten them listening and building a presence on FB, LI, and Twitter. We’ve also helped them launch a blog and formulate a blogging and content strategy for their new website which they will launch soon. They’ve been connecting with some very influential bloggers in the micro-business community, and they’re beginning to make the connections that will be very important for them going forward.
  • Another part of your un-RFP had to do with integrating traditional media with social media. You definitely want it all to go together. I hope you like metaphors… We see traditional media as the rock, the land, solid and important, but not fluid. Digital media, on the other hand, flows like water. And that flow will, overtime, shape the rock. Finally, social media is the clouds, picking up the water and carrying it wherever they go until they let it fall as rain.
  • Another part of your un-RFP had to do with integrating traditional media with social media. You definitely want it all to go together. I hope you like metaphors… We see traditional media as the rock, the land, solid and important, but not fluid. Digital media, on the other hand, flows like water. And that flow will, overtime, shape the rock. Finally, social media is the clouds, picking up the water and carrying it wherever they go until they let it fall as rain.

Integrate Social Media into Your Communication Strategy Integrate Social Media into Your Communication Strategy Presentation Transcript

  • Web 2.0 - How to Integrate Social Media into Your Communication Strategy www.SOCIAL FISH .org
  • Social Media Strategy Listening Cyclical Approach Launch an Initiative Feed & Nurture Develop a Strategy Measure & Evaluate
  • Social Media Strategy Advocacy Education Membership Association Focus
  • Social Media Strategy Advocacy Education Membership Conversation Collaboration Collective Action Association Focus Social Focus
  • Social Media Strategy Advocacy Education Membership Results Focus
  • Social Media Strategy Listening Cyclical Approach Launch an Initiative Feed & Nurture Develop a Strategy Measure & Evaluate
  • Social Media Strategy Mobile Video Widgets Social Bookmarks Feeds and Content Syndication Social Networks Blogs & Micro-blogging Big Picture
  • Social Media Tools Brian Solis and JESS3
  • Social Media Tools Jessica Hagy , Indexed Blog
  • Social Media Tools Social Objects videos photos friends books jobs Name that Website
    • Key Success Metrics
    • # of members using online directory
    • # of co-created volunteer opportunities
    • # of actions around volunteer opportunities
    • # of active open volunteers
    • # of working first-time volunteers
    • Qualitative feedback from community
    Case Study Unique Social Object Community Social Objects
  • Content Strategy Traditional media ~ rock Digital media ~ water Social media ~ clouds Flickr photo credit: Alex Pears Integrating Media
  • Content Strategy Traditional media ~ static versus fluid Digital media ~ key assets & frequency Social media ~ feed the outposts Flickr photo credit: Alex Pears Integrating Media
    • Key Success Metrics
    • 593 members (was 412)
    • 17% active (was 27%) 31% online (was 53%)
    • Page views up 20% since February
    • Secured sponsorship for YAP in Toronto
    • CAE study groups launched
    • Part of Forrester’s research on communities that attract Gen-X
    Case Study Feeding the social media machine Outposts Champions
  • Content Strategy Flickr photo credit: Phil Gimp Operational Integration
    • Key Success Metrics
    • 563 followers on Twitter (was 250)
    • 95 LinkedIn  group memers (was 26)
    • 91 Facebook  group  members (was 28)
    • Launched NASE  on  Micro-Business blog
    • First contact with key influencers
    • Positive feedback from members & prospects.
    Case Study Sharing the Load Frequency Teamwork
  • Social Media Policies Framework
  • Social Media Policies
    • Code of Conduct/Ethics
    • Social media policy for employees, members and/or volunteers
    • Terms of use or user agreement
    • Privacy
    • Disclaimers
    • Copyright, intellectual property
    • Blogs – posting & commenting policies
    • Moderator’s guidelines
    • Logo guidelines
    • Crisis communication plan
    Types of Policies
  • Case Study Policies in Plain English
  • Questions http://www.buzz2009.org/ Lindy Dreyer Chief Social Media Marketer [email_address] Skype/Twitter: lindydreyer http://associationmarketing.blogspot.com/