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Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
Classical greece
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Classical greece

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  • 1. Theatre History Greek Theatre
  • 2. Why the Greeks? <ul><li>Because of what happened afterwards: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Hellenization (influence of Greek culture) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Influence of the Roman Empire </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Renaissance values (Greece &amp; Rome revisited) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Aristotle (criticism as footnotes) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 3. Where is Greece?
  • 4. &nbsp;
  • 5. Timeline <ul><li>1300 BC Trojan war, worship of Dionysus arrives </li></ul><ul><li>800 Homer (Iliad &amp; Odyssey), origin of myths for Greek Drama </li></ul><ul><li>800 – 600 Development of the Polis (city-state), rise of the nobles, developed writing from Phoenicians </li></ul><ul><li>750 Development of Greek colonies - dependent on control of the sea, states compete for control </li></ul><ul><li>650 – 500 Rule of the Tyrants </li></ul><ul><li>560 - 510 Peristratus (tyrant) founded City Dionysia </li></ul><ul><li>508 - 404 Democracy - Classical Greece </li></ul><ul><li>490s War with Persians </li></ul>
  • 6. &nbsp;
  • 7. <ul><li>480-404 Golden Age of Athens </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Socrates, Plato, Aristotle - philosophers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Herodotus - father of history as a social science </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pythagorus - geometry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hippocrates - oath for physicians </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Playwrights - Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophones </li></ul></ul><ul><li>430-380s Pelopennesian war/Decline of Athens </li></ul><ul><li>404 Athens falls, Sparta takes control </li></ul><ul><li>371 Thebes takes control </li></ul><ul><li>Hellenistic Period </li></ul><ul><li>338 Macedonia takes political control, Athens continues as cultural capital </li></ul><ul><li>336-323 Alexander the Great </li></ul><ul><li>146 Rome conquers Greece </li></ul>
  • 8. Classical Greek Culture <ul><li>Never complete/whole, has elements of Helladic, democratic, near eastern, Egyptian, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Religion </li></ul><ul><li>Individual ( Humanism ) </li></ul><ul><li>Democracy </li></ul><ul><li>Justice </li></ul>
  • 9. <ul><li>Art Concepts </li></ul><ul><li>Beauty – is part of character, aesthetic, not philosophical. Beauty is realized through actions, art is realized in artworks/not discussion. Consisted of rationality, idealism, proportion, balance. </li></ul><ul><li>Greek architects - Parthenon, Acropolis </li></ul>
  • 10. Sculpture
  • 11. Architecture
  • 12. Audience <ul><li>4 Festivals a year – Rural, City, Lenaia, Anthesteria </li></ul><ul><li>(2 Dithyrambs, satyr play) </li></ul><ul><li>City Dionysia – c. March 530 B.C. presented in honor of Dionysus, god of wine, fertility, revelry/celebration </li></ul><ul><li>c. 501, becomes dithyrambs, 3 tragedies and a satyr play, 5 writers compete </li></ul><ul><li>c. 430 B.C. Oedipus Rex - 3 actors, 1 musician, 15 chorus </li></ul><ul><li>Play selection &amp; finance </li></ul><ul><li>Archons (magistrates) give out chorus, choregus pay for it all, playwrights direct </li></ul>
  • 13. Audience <ul><li>Theatre of Dionysus held 14,000 - 17,000 people </li></ul><ul><li>Performances lasted all day </li></ul><ul><li>Women and slaves? </li></ul><ul><li>Special seats for archon, choregoi, city leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Violence punishable by death </li></ul><ul><li>Prizes for actors, representatives selected from the audience </li></ul><ul><li>Plays represent community values, are social events </li></ul>
  • 14. Theatre Architecture <ul><ul><ul><li>orchestra (dancing place) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>theatron (seeing place) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>skene (background building with doors) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>paradoi (chorus entrances) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>pinakes (flats) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>periaktoi (triangles) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ekkyklema (for revealing bodies) rolls out </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>machina (crane) </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 15. &nbsp;
  • 16. &nbsp;
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  • 18. &nbsp;
  • 19. &nbsp;
  • 20. &nbsp;
  • 21. Plays <ul><li>Fifth Century tragic playwrights – 31 0f 1000 survive </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Aeschylus - introduced 2nd actor, plays dealt with noble families &amp; lofty themes, used chorus extensively, powerful poetry in choral sections, soldier, prominent citizen, fought at Marathon, wrote 90 plays, 7 extant, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Sophocles - plot construction, added 3rd actor, exploration of character, focus on individual, innovations in scene painting, single dramas not trilogies, civic leader, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Euripides - sympathetic potrayal of women, greater realism, skeptical treatment of gods, ‘modern’, diminished use of chorus </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Aristophones – old comedy, attacks authority figures, bold comic premise, exagerration, sexual humour </li></ul></ul></ul>
  • 22. <ul><li>Tragic Play Structure </li></ul><ul><li>a. Prologue </li></ul><ul><li>b. Parodos - Chorus Entrance </li></ul><ul><li>c. First Episode - Characters have dialogue (scene) </li></ul><ul><li>d. First Stasimon - Chorus response </li></ul><ul><li>e. Exodos - Chorus Exits </li></ul>
  • 23. Aristotle <ul><li>1. PLOT </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning i) Exposition </li></ul><ul><li>ii) Point of Attack </li></ul><ul><li>iii) Inciting Incident </li></ul><ul><li>iv) Major Dramatic Question </li></ul><ul><li>Middle i) Complications </li></ul><ul><ul><li>ii) Crisis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>iii) Division of Scenes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>End Resolution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>2. CHARACTERS </li></ul><ul><li>3. THOUGHT/IDEA </li></ul><ul><li>4. DICTION (Sound) </li></ul><ul><li>5. MUSIC </li></ul><ul><li>6. SPECTACLE </li></ul>
  • 24. Acting <ul><li>In early days playwright was the single actor, Thespis considered the first actor in 6th Cent. B.C. (534) </li></ul><ul><li>Aeschylus added second actor </li></ul><ul><li>By Sophocles it was three semi-professional actors playing multiple roles through the use of masks. </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on voice’s ability to express character, no facial expression, use of body to express emotion </li></ul><ul><li>Chorus </li></ul><ul><li>5 functions of the Greek Chorus </li></ul><ul><li>i) group character, gives advice, expresses opinion </li></ul><ul><li>ii) expresses author’s point of view </li></ul><ul><li>iii) ideal spectator, model the audience’s response </li></ul><ul><li>iv) establish mood </li></ul><ul><li>v) spectacle </li></ul>
  • 25. &nbsp;
  • 26. &nbsp;

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