• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Stylus Marketing To Chinese Youth
 

Stylus Marketing To Chinese Youth

on

  • 788 views

This is an interview I did for Stylus in London. Great firm doing exciting work. www,stylus.com

This is an interview I did for Stylus in London. Great firm doing exciting work. www,stylus.com

Statistics

Views

Total Views
788
Views on SlideShare
787
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Stylus Marketing To Chinese Youth Stylus Marketing To Chinese Youth Document Transcript

    • NEWS & ANALYSIS20 March 2012Marketing to Chinese Youth  It’s the biggest youth market in the world, but how much do we really know about it? Stylus spoke to American Michael Clauss, who has become a specialist on the subject through LP33, a company founded in 2010 to bring western media and technology into China. © SMG 2012
    • CONSUMER LIFESTYLE  Marketing to Chinese YouthIt’s the biggest youth market in the world, but how much do we really know about it? Stylus spoke toAmerican Michael Clauss, who has become a specialist on the subject through LP33, a companyfounded in 2010 to bring western media and technology into China.Tell us a little more about LP33.  LP33 is a media and technology company that specialises in bringing new and disruptive media properties and technologies into the Asian region, using world­changing resources and methodologies.  The potential of the Chinese youth market is huge, but most western businesses find it harder than they expect. Why should this be so?  It’s all about expectation adjustment. Western expectations are usually based on assumptions that customer acquisition rates will be similar to their own markets.  In many cases, marketers cant fathom the drastic nuanced differences in China in brand management and loyalty – and how quickly successful ventures (especially online and mobile) are cloned.  Beijing subway advert Michael Clauss   At a certain point, I think you quit vocalizing “why?” or “how can they allow that?” because it’s futile. I still think “why is it like that?” on occasion (which is good because it gets you to the core of the issue), but you become more comfortable with the fact that this is how it is here in China, and that thinking, as well as methods, need to be modified to succeed.  In terms of regulation and oversight of markets, there may be things you dont agree with and want to change, but over time you realize it may not be changeable and you have to move around the obstacle rather than running it over – like we are used to doing in the US and elsewhere in the west.  Are Chinese Youth intrinsically different to Western Youth?  As a marketer, and as part of that an amateur sociologist and psychologist/voyeur, I depend a great deal on observation in the market, besides the numbers available – which show modest differences.  Empirically, Ive noticed they are different at the edges of their personalities. Quieter in general, louder when able, but much the same in the middle. I picture it like a parochial school kid in the US who gets out of that rigid school environment and goes to a less strict public high school or college, where they enjoy their freedom and take advantage because they were previously restrained. I find it the same in China. When not being watched and decorum allows, they really let loose and have a lot of fun.  Any big surprises you’ve noted?  As an anecdotal example, every month Im there I try to get out of my comfort zone and explore. So, I went to a dance club in Beijing in late 2011 to check out the atmosphere and see what it was like and I was quite surprised.  These Chinese, who were all around 20 years old, were much more expressive than Id ever seen, whereas on the streets – where everyone is monitored at a low level – they are very stoic and reverent compared to the average kid on the street in the US.   © SMG 2012
    • It wasnt like anywhere else. There was a tremendous spike of energy – not drug­ or alcohol­fuelled, as far as I could tell –that just seemed like explosive exuberance coming out.  Im not saying that they got any crazier than Ive seen in bars or clubs in the US or Europe, but it was enormously powerful in that its a much starker contrast – just because the baseline norm is so much more stoic on the street in China.  Do they have the same kind of spending power as their Western counterparts? Presumably not just yet?  Generally no. The urban middle class is exploding in China, but the median income is still pretty low. However, the Chinese youth have a way of making the most of what they have. I find it similar to my experience in Europe somewhat, in that in some things brand is very important and they would rather have one branded item as opposed to three so­so non­branded items. The Chinese strongly equate brand to quality.   However, in most cases the amount of money they make is probably the most theyve ever made or had (as with all young people), so there is an air of excitement about being a consumer at any level that is heightened in China.  In the US many young people are focused on being the best at something but the ability to innovate and possibility of wealth has always been there. In China, because of communism and the new possibilities capitalism brings, people are just excited about being part of the new system and era, as well as it bringing the possibility of success and wealth.  American and European youth arent as excited to be involved, somewhat taking it for granted because they’ve always had capitalistic opportunity, and because of the poor economic conditions in those regions and in many cases the inherent lack of opportunity.  Many think that China needs rebellion and system upheaval. In China, no one I know wants to rebel against the system: theyre too busy trying to succeed within it.    What consumer characteristics have you noted in the youth demographic in China?  There are three issues I would suggest are pervasive:  1. Ambition is universal. Whether you come from a blessed or impoverished background, it’s the same.  2. The social hierarchy is pretty flat when it comes to money. All money is the same. The perception of new money vs old money is the same. Success is success – and its all the same.  3. Chinese youths backgrounds are diverse, but they have a great deal in common as well. The need to get a foothold in the professional hierarchy is important for them all. A more affluent education, which starts early, usually produces a much better white­collar job, which in turn makes it easier to build and maintain a more affluent lifestyle and build purchasing power long­term.  Specifically on tastes in music, do Chinese youth display the same diversity of tastes that we see in the West? Or is it all rather more predictable?  Very diverse and very unpredictable. Many Chinese youth respect and listen to international and Chinese classical musicand even Disney music because of the quality. This is great in my mind, even though it would be viewed as kiddie music by our teens or twentysomethings. In the US, most teens wouldnt be caught dead listening to classical or Disney music in a social setting.   As an example in China, one of my counterparts is a male twentysomething college educated Beijing native. We get in his car to go to a meeting and hes listening to the Beauty and the Beast soundtrack! In discussing it with him, he loves itand wasnt embarrassed or affected by my questions at all.  By contrast, I have worked with several music companies full of young people in the US, and I guarantee you we never listened to Disney music in their cars or offices.   © SMG 2012
    • Any other thoughts you would like to add on marketing to Chinese youth?  Aspiration, affluence, and amplification are the keys. This could be argued in most youth markets, but it’s especially true in China where most everything is exaggerated and faster.  Chinese youth are hyper­aspirational. There is an old Chinese proverb that translates as, “The old horse in the stable still yearns to run 1000 miles.” I like it because it speaks to the universal aspiration of the young and old in Chinese culture.  They love affluence and being able to convey affluence, especially as they climb the ladder of success. Everything is amplified and should be amplified across all types of networks. A girl with a new Juicy Couture bag in China would be under­using it if she just carried stuff in it and didnt show it off in her web video – and weibo it when purchased.  In terms of the difference in men I recently heard an interview where the CEO of Coach Inc. mentioned that according to their research 50% of men in the US dont know the brand of wallet they carry, let alone the brand of briefcase. I will say this is very different in China.  Id also mention that the Chinese accept and even expect to be immersed in marketing and commercialism everywhere inevery way. This means they put stickers and promotional signs on bus and subway ceilings, sidewalks, taxi headrests, flashing signs and logos in places we would think are way over­the­top in the US. The headrest covers on Air China flightsadvertise Chinese Citic Bank before you even arrive!  When I first arrived I would go out on the streets for a meal or a walk and feel like Id been picked up by the ankles and literally dipped (like an ice­cream cone dipped in sprinkles) in consumerism and advertising. On my first couple of trips, long ago, it felt very intrusive to me, but then I realized its all part of the amplification as well and you just adapt and barely notice it now.  The Chinese, especially the young, seem to have picked up on social media lightning­fast: is this a trend you’ve identified too?  Social media adoption and usage are growing incredibly quickly. Things are changing so fast (new jobs and companies popping up, new social media emerging, new brands becoming pervasive) that the velocity of messages and attention are split between many things at any one time.  There are also differences in that certain things become popular so quickly and arent regulated as stringently (like knock­off products) as in the US. This produces a certain caveat emptor that isnt necessary in the US.  This is tricky at first – and you have to be careful. For instance, it’s fine to buy novelties or low­cost paraphernalia and snacks at a street shop or market, but you wouldnt buy trendy high­end goods thinking theyre real, or hyped vitamins or pharmaceuticals in that environment for safety’s sake, but it’s fine to buy them in the properly authorized shops. This seems like common sense to most, but there are constantly stories in the news about Chinese natives and foreigners (who are used to the FDA and such) buying the latest trending energy pill or pharmaceutical on the street and ending up poisoned.   In the time frame that you’ve been working with China, have you noticed changes in Youth? Is this a fast­changing market?  To me, life in China for the young urban dweller is comparatively like living your whole life in the US as a teen in a year.  There is a book that came out several years ago called "bowling alone". It is about how tribes (demographic groups, mostly in the US in the book) have become more secular, transient and professionally based. The primary example in thebook being the disintegration of the bowling league (which was one of the primary social outlets for workers) from the mid 20th century.  The Chinese youth tribes are changing radically in this way and even more quickly because of the hyper rural to urban movements as well as in professional aspirations and opportunities. Young people are leaving their rural villages and families by the hundreds of thousands and establishing new urban “tribes” based on new professional relationships and impromptu initial living and social arrangements.  Add in mobile computing and social media – and the transience for professional advancement is almost unlimited in China. I cant speak to the regional differences as much.  Do you find it restrictive working in a country where the government influence is so all­pervasive?  No. As I mentioned above, as long as you can make certain adjustments to your expectations and learn to find work around and compromise as opposed to considering forcing things as the only course of action.  A rebellious attitude in brand messaging would not be welcomed in China and could be seen as disruptive to the collective good of the people, and therefore not allowed or censored. This is a judgment call by the Chinese government, but also shows how a moving line might be approached, but should not be stepped over.  © SMG 2012
    • Stylus Summary     Conventional thinking has it that  Chinese Youth tastes in music can  Chinese Youth are more deferential  be surprising, including classical  than their western counterparts. Away  music and Disney musicals!  from public settings, that may not be  so true.     The system is the system in China.  Understand it, work with it – a more  aggressive western approach may  prove inappropriate or counter­ productive.    ARTICLE REFERENCES LP33  © SMG 2012