What's the Difference
Between Mood and Emotion
(and what does that have to
do with binge eating)?
www.bingeeatingbreakthro...
When we are trying to deal
with the world of emotion, we
can often forget or be
confused about the
differences between moo...
Moods are generally emotional
feelings that last for an extended
period of time, say at least one or two
days. When we hav...
In contrast, emotions are things
that tend to come and go quite
quickly. Emotions are aroused in
people by some specific o...
When compared to moods, emotions are
more extreme. They're also much more
likely to be caused by immediate
circumstances. ...
We can experience emotions
at the same time as moods,
but they seem to ‘sit on top’ of
moods. For instance, in a bad
mood ...
Emotions are aroused in
people by some specific
objects or situations. On the
other hand, moods are not
created in someone...
Our emotions are susceptible to
the mood we are in, and this also
make us more likely to interpret
our environment in part...
So what's this got to do with
binge eating?
Suppressed emotions, or emotions
one feels embarrassed or ashamed
about, can drive one to turn to
something associated wit...
Often you're not conscious of
what's driving your behaviors,
and you operate in an "autopilot"
mode as you turn towards th...
Not only was food comforting and
nourishing to us as babies, but as
primal humans, sugary and fattening
foods often were i...
When you're troubled by an
emotion, the stress can trigger
your brain to operate in a
"survival" mode…causing you to
crave...
Often you don't realize what's
happening…you just know
you have a craving.
As you indulge in these cravings and
urges, you find pleasure, comfort and
relief from your stress. Naturally,
when you st...
Understanding how our
brains work and the nature of
emotions can be a useful way
to gain perspective on
compulsions like b...
When you feel powerless
against your urges, by
understanding what's
happening in your mind and
emotions, you can learn how...
For a free binge eating
breakthrough course and
further tips, visit
www.bingeeatingbreakthrough.com
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What's the difference between mood and emotion (and what does that have to do with binge eating)?

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Understanding how our brains work and the nature of emotions can be a useful way to gain perspective on compulsions like binge eating or compulsive overeating. When you feel powerless against your urges, by understanding what's happening in your mind and emotions, you can learn how to manage urges to overeat. For a free binge eating breakthrough course and further tips, visit http://www.bingeeatingbreakthrough.com.

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What's the difference between mood and emotion (and what does that have to do with binge eating)?

  1. 1. What's the Difference Between Mood and Emotion (and what does that have to do with binge eating)? www.bingeeatingbreakthrough.com
  2. 2. When we are trying to deal with the world of emotion, we can often forget or be confused about the differences between moods and emotions.
  3. 3. Moods are generally emotional feelings that last for an extended period of time, say at least one or two days. When we have these moody periods, they often feel like stages that we are going through and they are hard to shift. Mood is something a person may not express whereas emotions may be expressed.
  4. 4. In contrast, emotions are things that tend to come and go quite quickly. Emotions are aroused in people by some specific objects or situations. For example, if a person gets angry, he expresses that emotion towards someone.
  5. 5. When compared to moods, emotions are more extreme. They're also much more likely to be caused by immediate circumstances. Emotions are likely to be more sharper than moods, and also more varied; whilst we can have a great range of exquisitely different emotions, we tend to have moods which are more generalized -- i.e. a good mood, a bad mood.
  6. 6. We can experience emotions at the same time as moods, but they seem to ‘sit on top’ of moods. For instance, in a bad mood it's quite possible to have brief feelings of happiness and joy.
  7. 7. Emotions are aroused in people by some specific objects or situations. On the other hand, moods are not created in someone because of any specific object or any particular situation.
  8. 8. Our emotions are susceptible to the mood we are in, and this also make us more likely to interpret our environment in particular ways and distort our thinking. When we are in a bad mood, it is much easier to misinterpret things in the light of this bad mood.
  9. 9. So what's this got to do with binge eating?
  10. 10. Suppressed emotions, or emotions one feels embarrassed or ashamed about, can drive one to turn to something associated with comfort, pleasure or security…like food. Feeling overwhelmed by an emotion like grief, anger, sadness or loneliness can drive you to seek security or comfort that food often provides.
  11. 11. Often you're not conscious of what's driving your behaviors, and you operate in an "autopilot" mode as you turn towards the thing that comforts or relieves you (like food, especially sugary or fatty foods).
  12. 12. Not only was food comforting and nourishing to us as babies, but as primal humans, sugary and fattening foods often were in short supply. When we came in contact with them, we would hoard them. Food has always been a link to our survival but also our pleasure and delight.
  13. 13. When you're troubled by an emotion, the stress can trigger your brain to operate in a "survival" mode…causing you to crave sugary or fattening foods, or to want to eat more than you normally would.
  14. 14. Often you don't realize what's happening…you just know you have a craving.
  15. 15. As you indulge in these cravings and urges, you find pleasure, comfort and relief from your stress. Naturally, when you start to feel the stress again the next day, you'll again turn to the thing that gave you pleasure and comfort the day before. In a short time, you can then form a new habit.
  16. 16. Understanding how our brains work and the nature of emotions can be a useful way to gain perspective on compulsions like binge eating or compulsive overeating.
  17. 17. When you feel powerless against your urges, by understanding what's happening in your mind and emotions, you can learn how to manage urges to overeat.
  18. 18. For a free binge eating breakthrough course and further tips, visit www.bingeeatingbreakthrough.com
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