Enzymes activity in tenderizing meat

  • 6,154 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
6,154
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
59
Comments
0
Likes
2

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Tenderizing meat makes tough cuts morepalatable.Physical methods for tenderizing meat includepounding it with a meat mallet or cooking it.Chemical methods include using a commerciallyprepared meat tenderizer or another type of additive,such as a marinade, to make the meat easier to cut andchew. Science projects can be devised to explore theprocess of tenderizing meat.
  • 2. The way a meat tenderizer works dependson whether it is an enzymatic tenderizer or amanual tool. The first type breaks down the bondsbetween the cells of a piece of meat on a chemicallevel, while the second breaks the bonds usingforce.The way a meat tenderizer works dependson whether it is an enzymatic tenderizer or amanual tool. The first type breaks down the bondsbetween the cells of a piece of meat on a chemicallevel, while the second breaks the bonds usingforce.
  • 3. Enzymatic meat tenderizers are made ofproteolytic enzymes called proteases, which breakdown the peptide bonds between the amino acidsfound in complex proteins. This makes the meatsofter, since one of the main things holding meattogether is the complex protein collagen.The most common types of enzymatictenderizers are bromelain, which is made frompineapples; papain, which is made from papayas;actinidin, which is made from kiwis; and ficin, which ismade from figs. When sprinkled on uncooked meat,they can soften it within minutes, but may make itsquishy if left on too long. They can be used both inmarinades or independently.Enzymatic meat tenderizers are made ofproteolytic enzymes called proteases, which breakdown the peptide bonds between the amino acidsfound in complex proteins. This makes the meatsofter, since one of the main things holding meattogether is the complex protein collagen.The most common types of enzymatictenderizers are bromelain, which is made frompineapples; papain, which is made from papayas;actinidin, which is made from kiwis; and ficin, which ismade from figs. When sprinkled on uncooked meat,they can soften it within minutes, but may make itsquishy if left on too long. They can be used both inmarinades or independently.
  • 4. Other products can also be used to improvethe texture of meat, even if theyre not usually soldas meat tenderizers. This includes mostly acidicproduce, like ginger and tomatoes, as well as acidicbeverages like coffee, beer, and soda. These alsowork by breaking down the bonds that hold meatcells together, but they do it with acid, rather thanenzymes. Baking soda and fermented milk productslike yogurt can also soften meat enzymatically.Other products can also be used to improvethe texture of meat, even if theyre not usually soldas meat tenderizers. This includes mostly acidicproduce, like ginger and tomatoes, as well as acidicbeverages like coffee, beer, and soda. These alsowork by breaking down the bonds that hold meatcells together, but they do it with acid, rather thanenzymes. Baking soda and fermented milk productslike yogurt can also soften meat enzymatically.
  • 5. Pros and Cons of TenderizingTenderizing meat can make it softer and improve its texture. Italso makes it easier to cut and can often cut cooking time. Additionally,it may be necessary for some recipes that call for meat to be all onethickness, and can ensure that meat cooks evenly. Despite this, usingtenderizers for too long or on meat thats already soft can make itunpleasantly squishy, and it may be difficult to anticipate how differentingredients in a recipe interact with enzymatic or acidic tenderizers. Toget good results with this process, its generally best to understand therecommended time for using each substance, consider any reactions itmight have with oils or cookware, and to choose cuts of meat thatcontain a lot of collagen, like the shank, brisket, neck, or ribs.ConsiderationsPapain and bromelain tenderizers require temperatures as highas 185 degrees F to stop the tenderizing process. Meats cooked to rareor medium rare dont reach those temperatures and the tenderizer willcontinue to break down collagen even after the meat is cooked, giving ita mushy texture over time. Alternatively, freezing will not fully stop thecollagen breakdown. Thus, you should use tenderizers just beforecooking, following the manufacturers directions.Pros and Cons of TenderizingTenderizing meat can make it softer and improve its texture. Italso makes it easier to cut and can often cut cooking time. Additionally,it may be necessary for some recipes that call for meat to be all onethickness, and can ensure that meat cooks evenly. Despite this, usingtenderizers for too long or on meat thats already soft can make itunpleasantly squishy, and it may be difficult to anticipate how differentingredients in a recipe interact with enzymatic or acidic tenderizers. Toget good results with this process, its generally best to understand therecommended time for using each substance, consider any reactions itmight have with oils or cookware, and to choose cuts of meat thatcontain a lot of collagen, like the shank, brisket, neck, or ribs.ConsiderationsPapain and bromelain tenderizers require temperatures as highas 185 degrees F to stop the tenderizing process. Meats cooked to rareor medium rare dont reach those temperatures and the tenderizer willcontinue to break down collagen even after the meat is cooked, giving ita mushy texture over time. Alternatively, freezing will not fully stop thecollagen breakdown. Thus, you should use tenderizers just beforecooking, following the manufacturers directions.
  • 6. Sources/ References:  Enzymes & Meat Tenderizers | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6296829_enzymes-meat-tenderizers.html#ixzz2NW9mG8T6 http://www.wisegeek.org/how-do-meat-tenderizers-work.htm Science Projects on Tenderizing Meat |eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_7936176_science-projects-tenderizing-meat.html#ixzz2Nu8XaHl0 Sources/ References:  Enzymes & Meat Tenderizers | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6296829_enzymes-meat-tenderizers.html#ixzz2NW9mG8T6 http://www.wisegeek.org/how-do-meat-tenderizers-work.htm Science Projects on Tenderizing Meat |eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/info_7936176_science-projects-tenderizing-meat.html#ixzz2Nu8XaHl0