Azure Deployment(Seattle)

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Going Live with your Azure Solution …

Going Live with your Azure Solution

Windows Azure features a powerful, yet simple deployment model. By focusing on your application and abstracting away the infrastructure details, you can deploy almost any app with minimal fuss. In this session, we’ll walk you through the basics of Windows Azure deployment, including site monitoring, diagnostics and performance issues.



Highlights include:

· Start-to-Finish Visual Studio demonstration of a realistic XML data driven business web site from the desktop to the cloud.

· Windows Azure Deployments

· Start-to-Finish Visual Studio demonstration of a realistic SQL Server data driven business web site from the desktop to the cloud.

· Configuration of your application in the cloud

· Guidance and Suggestions to ensure your success

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  • Welcome everyone my name is <name> and I’m here today to introduce you to one of the most important new developer technologies starting off our new decade… Microsoft Windows Azure
  • Our agenda for this session will be to show you Windows Azure in action using Visual Studio.Next, we’ll explore the Windows Azure Services PlatformWe’ll become familiar with the core services of Windows AzureWe’ll learn about Windows Azure RolesAnd we’ll use Visual Studio to develop our first Azure application
  • This is the first session of a three part series. My objective is to have you leave the third session ready to develop Windows Azure applicationsThis session will give you the basics of what you need to know, and the next two will build up your knowledge of application development targeting the Windows Azure Platform.In this session, you will gain an understanding of the Windows Azure platform components… including Windows Azure, Windows Azure Data Services, and SQL Azure… and you’ll learn what tools and software libraries you’ll need to start constructing applications for the cloud.
  • First… lets start with a clean slate and build a web application from the ground up. We’ll get that application running on our desktop in the local Windows Azure DevFabric. The Cloud will not be a part of this step... But well get there very soon.
  • In this step of our demonstration, we are going to take the web application that is presently running in the local DevFabric and we’re going to deploy it to what’s called the Staging area in the Windows Azure Cloud. Once we have completed this step, we’ll launch our web browser against the Staging area to see our application run in the Cloud for the very first time.
  • In this step of our demonstration, we are going to take the web application that is presently running in the Windows Azure Staging area, and we’re going to promote it to the Production environment.Once we have completed this step, we’ll launch our web browser against the Production environment to see our application run as our production users would see it.
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going back to our local DevFabric and making some changes to our application to migrate it from using XML data files to a SQL Server database. We’ll execute our application from the local Devfabric to get things running. Since this step is all development work, nothing will happen in the cloud… that will come later when we deploy.
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going to deploy only our SQL Database into the SQL Azure cloud. We’ll continue to execute our application from the local Devfabric to ensure that everything went smoothly with our database promotion.Unlike Windows Azure, SQL Azure does not have a Staging area, so this represents a direct promotion of our database into the production environment.
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going to complete our full deployment of database and application to the cloud!As you may recall, we already have a version of your application sitting in the production environment. This is the version that runs off of an XML data store.We’ve already deployed our SQL Database into the SQL Azure cloud… but I’m showing it here just to give us context. We’ll proceed now with deploying our web application to Windows Azure. We’ll deploy to staging and test there. Then when we are satisfied that everything is working properly, we’ll swap Production and Staging.Once this has been done, we’ll point our web browser at the Production environment to see our finished product!
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going to complete our full deployment of database and application to the cloud!As you may recall, we already have a version of your application sitting in the production environment. This is the version that runs off of an XML data store.We’ve already deployed our SQL Database into the SQL Azure cloud… but I’m showing it here just to give us context. We’ll proceed now with deploying our web application to Windows Azure. We’ll deploy to staging and test there. Then when we are satisfied that everything is working properly, we’ll swap Production and Staging.Once this has been done, we’ll point our web browser at the Production environment to see our finished product!
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going to show how updates can be made to our live Windows Azure application.We’ll revise our application with Visual Studio and test it locally from our Dev Fabric. Then, in the interest of demonstration brevity, we’ll deploy our revised application directly into the production environment, thereby bypassing staging.Once our upgrade deployment has been completed, we’ll point our web browser at the Production environment to see our finished product!
  • In this step of our demonstration, we’re going to show how configuration changes can be made to our Windows Azure environment, such as the number of web and worker instances to create to service our application’s users.It is important to understand the differences between our application’s configuration and the services configuration. Our application keeps its configuration data in its web.config file, while the service keeps its environmental configuration in the ServiceConfiguration.cscfg. If you consider the procedures that we have been through, it will be apparent that changes made to the web.config file will require a service redeployment as that is the only way to get a service package propagated to service instances.Keep in mind that it’s possible to add custom configuration to the ServiceConfiguration as we did for the demos in the Data segment of this presentation thereby avoiding the need to redeploy when making configuration changes.Let’s proceed with a configuration change to the ServiceConfiguration.cscfg file.
  • Here is a list of resources that will allow you to follow up on many of the features you’ve seen today, as well as become part of our development community!
  • Questions?

Transcript

  • 1. Windows Azure ApplicationsFrom Construction through Deployment
    Sumit Chawla
    Senior Program Manager
    Interoperability@Microsoft
    http://blogs.msdn.com/interoperability
  • 2. Agenda
    Deploying your solution to Windows Azure
    Build Web Application
    Migrate Web Application to Windows Azure
    Deploy to the Cloud
    Migrate Database to SQL Server
    Migrate SQL Database to SQL Azure
    Deploy SQL Azure Database
    Migrate Web Application to the Cloud
    Repeat with Eclipse:
    Develop & Deploy a PHP application
  • 3. Objectives - What are you leaving with?
  • 4. Part 1 - Developing and Running Application From the Local DevFabric
    Development Workstation
    The Cloud
    DevFabric
    Web App
  • 5. Part 2 - Deploy A Web ApplicationFrom DevFabric to Windows Azure Staging
    Development Workstation
    Cloud Fabric
    Production
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Web App
    Staging
  • 6. Part 3 - Deploy A Web ApplicationFrom Windows Azure Staging to Production
    Cloud Fabric
    Production
    Staging
    Web App
    Web App
  • 7. Demo
  • 8. Part 4 - Developing and Running ApplicationWith SQL Server From the Local DevFabric
    Development Workstation
    The Cloud
    DevFabric
    Web App
    SQL Database
  • 9. Part 5 - Developing and Running ApplicationWith SQL Server From the Local DevFabric
    Cloud Fabric
    Development Workstation
    Production
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Staging
    SQL Database
    SQL Database
    SQL Azure
  • 10. Part 5 - Developing and Running ApplicationWith Windows Azure and SQL Azure
    Cloud Fabric
    Development Workstation
    Production
    Web App
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Web App
    Staging
    SQL Database
    Web App
    SQL Database
    SQL Azure
  • 11. Part 6 – Deploying ApplicationsWith Windows Azure and SQL Azure
    Cloud Fabric
    Development Workstation
    Production
    Web App
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Web App
    Staging
    SQL Database
    Web App
    SQL Database
    SQL Azure
  • 12. Demo
  • 13. Part 7 - Deploying Updates To Applications
    Cloud Fabric
    Development Workstation
    Production
    Web App
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Web App
    Staging
    Web App
    SQL Database
    SQL Azure
    SQL Database
  • 14. Part 8 - Revising Application Configuration
    Cloud Fabric
    Development Workstation
    Production
    Config
    Web App
    DevFabric
    Web App
    Web App
    Staging
    Web App
    SQL Database
    SQL Azure
    SQL Database
  • 15. Demo
  • 16. More InformationStuff We Wanted To Talk About But Didn’t Have Time For…
    Kerner, Mathew. “Windows Azure Diagnostics, Logging and Monitoring in the Cloud.” Microsoft PDC. 2009. http://microsoftpdc.com/Sessions/SVC15
    AppFabric
    Smith, Justin. “REST Services Security Using the Access Control Service”. Microsoft PDC. 2009 http://microsoftpdc.com/Sessions/SVC19
    Interoperability
    - Java, PHP, Ruby SDKs for Windows Azure Platform
    http://www.azure.com/interoperability
  • 17. Q & A
  • 18. Open Platform