Plan 1: Big Goals

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Plan 1: Big Goals

  1. 1. Plan 1 The Big Picture of Daily Lesson Planning
  2. 2. Do Now: Imagine that your first lesson plan is due tomorrow (Don’t worry, it isn’t). Write down 5-10 steps you would take in order to prepare. Handout 1 (pg 55): Daily Lesson Planning Overview Self-Check: How many responses did you get correct? How many did you get in the right order?
  3. 3. Set 1 Review What was the main point of SET1? Effective planners are backwards planners who “Mind the GAP”: think about goals, assessments, and plans (in that order)
  4. 4. Virtual CS • Template: – Anything that determines or serves as a pattern – Lesson plan templates give us a pattern or a model for how we think about teaching
  5. 5. Virtual CS • Session Objective: – CM’s will select, defend, (and sometimes modify) only those lesson plan templates that would help the teacher backwards plan for student mastery
  6. 6. Virtual CS • The Jigsaw Puzzle: – Template = the picture on the lid of the box • Guides our lesson planning • Provides us with a big picture understanding • Allows us to create a strong plan – Strong plans are the foundation for student achievement
  7. 7. In this session… • Step One: How Students Learn – We’ll look at a framework for how students learn, and thus for how teachers should plan and teach • Step Two: Characteristics of Effective Templates – We’ll learn what distinguishes an effective template, and look at several examples • Step Three: – We’ll address the question of whether even strong templates can be modified to suit specific planning needs
  8. 8. Introduction to New Material: How Students Learn • I Do = a segment where the teacher shows students what to do, and how and why to do it • We Do = when the teacher offers support as a coaching, correcting, and supporting role • You Do = when students are practicing independently, with minimal teacher intervention
  9. 9. Introduction to New Material: How Students Learn • Opening = when the teacher sets students up to want to learn • I Do = a segment where the teacher shows students what to do, and how and why to do it • We Do = when the teacher offers support as a coaching, correcting, and supporting role • You Do = when students are practicing independently, with minimal teacher intervention • Closing = where students are asked to summarize and connect what they learned
  10. 10. Guided Practice: How Students Learn • Handout 3 (pg 57): Planning Pitfalls, Part I – Scenarios • Your Task – Read Scenarios – Decide which scenarios matches which pitfall, and discuss which part of our learning framework the teacher is not using effectively
  11. 11. Guided Practice: How Students Learn Handout 3: Planning Pitfalls, Part I – Scenarios Scenario Name That Pitfall A- HS Government (Ms. Laidlaw) All Teacher, All the Time B- Spanish I (Ms. Wakefield) There’s No “U” in Team C- 6th Grade Math (Mr. Wetzler) Three, Two, One – Action! D- 1st Grade Reading (Ms. Lewis) And Cut! E- 8th Grade Writing (Mr. Wetterhahn) What’s this “We” Business
  12. 12. Guided Practice: How Students Learn Handout 4 (pg 60): Planning Pitfalls, Part II -Consequences • Your Task – Read the student comment that corresponds with each pitfall – Brainstorm with your partner, specific consequences this pitfall will have for either students or for the teacher • What did the student’s comment tell you about how their learning suffered as a direct result of the pitfall? • Are the learning consequences for students short-term, long-term or both? • What other consequences are there to this pitfall? Will students be less invested in learning? Will the teacher potentially have increased difficulty managing the class?
  13. 13. Pitfall: Three, Two, One – Action! • Pitfall = lack of strong opening – Students are unmotivated • Don’t know why it’s important • Curiosity is not piqued • No connection – Low investment • Opportunities for deep learning are missed
  14. 14. Pitfall: All Teacher All the Time • Pitfall = teacher’s inability to balance the “I do” with the rest of the lesson, their inability to focus on key points, and their inability to present the content in a meaningful way – Students are confused – don’t know what is important and what is not – Students are bored – Students do not get meaningfully engaged with the content
  15. 15. Pitfall: What’s This “We” Business? • Pitfall = because the teacher did not actively coach and correct students during the “We Do” portion of the lesson – Students don’t receive in-the-moment feedback – Students may harbor misconceptions • May lead to frustration • May lead to misbehavior
  16. 16. Pitfall: There’s No “U” in Team • Pitfall = lack of “You Do” – Students have limited opportunity to internalize new knowledge/skill – Teacher doesn’t have a clear understanding of whether individual students have made progress
  17. 17. Pitfall: And Cut! • Pitfall = the lack of a strong closing to summarize and connect the new knowledge and skills – Students don’t have a clear understanding of how what they learn on one day connects to anything they have done in the past or will do in the future
  18. 18. Pitfall Conclusion If we don’t plan in a way that aligns to how students learn, the risk is that students won’t learn, and we know that isn’t an option.
  19. 19. Effective Lesson Planning Templates Using a Strong template increases the likelihood that you will create an effective plan…which in turn increases the likelihood that your students will learn.
  20. 20. Characteristics of Effective Lesson Plan Templates • Template = Anything that determines or serves as a pattern; a model • Effective lesson plan templates guide teacher thinking in 2 ways: – They make backwards planning easier • They Mind the GAP: Goal, Assessment, Plan – They push us to plan in a way that maximizes student learning
  21. 21. Guided Practice: Effective Lesson Plan Templates Handout 5 (pg 62)- Template Sort Packet – Your Task • With a partner: examine and discuss templates, sort templates into two groups: effective and non-effective • Criteria: – Will this template help me backwards plan? (Mind the GAP) – Will this template help me plan a sequence of methods that leads to student mastery? (I Do, We Do, You Do)
  22. 22. Guided Practice: Effective Lesson Plan Templates Handout 5- Template Sort Packet Template Mind the GAP I Do, We Do, You Do Verdict A Yes Yes Effective B No No Ineffective C Yes Yes Effective D Yes Yes Effective E Yes Yes Effective
  23. 23. Template Evaluation Handout 6 (pg 68) – Template Sort Response Guide Directions: Work and Discuss with a Partner • Red the Template Evaluation • Identify which template it matches (A, B, C, D, or E) • Compare the evaluation to your own response
  24. 24. Check Your Responses Evaluation Template 1 C: Pre-K – 1st Grade PPA Activities 2 D: Five “E’s” Lesson Plan 3 A: Five-Step Lesson Plan 4 E: Read-Aloud Lesson Plan 5 B: Elementary Daily Planner
  25. 25. Synthesis: Templates as Dynamic Resources • For a Template to be effective, the answer to these two questions needs to be “yes”: – Will it help me backwards plan? – Will it lead me to plan a sequence of methods aligned to how students learn?
  26. 26. Key Takeaways • Effective teachers are made, not born • Creating purposeful lesson plans is a foundational action of strong teachers, an action that must be taught, learned, and continuously improved. • All lesson planning is driven by effective goals – daily objectives • Strong teachers backwards plan their daily lessons by thinking of goals, assessments, and plans in that order. • Students learn best when new content and skills are presented in an “I do, We do, You do” framework, and when this framework is bookended by clear openings and closings.
  27. 27. Conclusion Strong teachers start with strong plans. And strong plans are guided by strong templates that push teacher thinking in the right way.
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