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Intro to missing_basics_goldberg
 

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    Intro to missing_basics_goldberg Intro to missing_basics_goldberg Presentation Transcript

    • The Missing Basics:What Engineers Don’t Learn & Why They Need to Learn It
      David E. GoldbergIllinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering EducationUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana, IL 61801 USAdeg@illinois.edu
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Do Engineers Learn the Right Stuff?
      • Engineering education filled with “the basics:” math, science, & engin science.
      • Many reform lists the same:
      • Need more “design.”
      • Need more “people skills.”
      • Need better “communications.”
      • Want to do 3 things:
      • Argue that important stuff missing.
      • Identify it clearly & rigorously.
      • Understand why the missing stuff is so important right now.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Begin with the End in Mind
      • Reflection on 20-years experience with Senior Design.
      • General Engineering at UIUC established in 1921 following curriculum study.
      • Grinter report of 1955 led to more math and engineering science at expense of design.
      • UCLA conference 1962 & Ford Foundation grant 1966.
      • Money ran out 1971.
      • Industrially sponsored ever after.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      Stephen R. Covey (b. 1932 )
    • Ready, Set, Go
      • These are seniors.
      • Should be engineers on the threshold.
      • Express preferences for projects.
      • Get assigned to a project: 3-member teams & faculty advisor.
      • Go on the plant trip.
      • Query: What don’t they know how to do?
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Failure 1: Inability to Ask
      • Don’t know how to frame or ask good questions.
      • Difficulty probing the problem.
      • Trouble querying what has been tried.
      • Problem learning about vendors and sources of information.
      • Historical terms: Socrates 101.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      Socrates (470-399 BCE)
    • Failure 2: Inability to Label
      • Don’t know names of common systems, assemblies, and components of technology.
      • Difficulty labeling new artifact concepts or models.
      • Linguistically naïve.
      • Mainly comfortable with familiar categories and objects.
      • Historical terms: Aristotle 101.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      Aristotle (384-322 BCE)
    • Failure 3: Inability to Model
      • Don’t know how to model conceptually:
      • As causal chain.
      • As categorical list of types or kinds.
      • Pavlovian dogs when it comes to equations.
      • Need to understand problem qualitatively in words and diagrams prior to quantitative modeling undertaking.
      • Historical terms: Hume 101 or Aristotle 102.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      David Hume (1711-1776)
    • Failure 4: Inability to Decompose
      • Don’t know how to decompose big problem into little problems.
      • Look for magic bullets in equations of motion.
      • Most projects too hard: Companies don’t pay $9500 for plugging into Newton’s laws.
      • Historical terms: Descartes 101?
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      René Descartes (1596-1650)
    • Failure 5: Inability to Measure
      Don’t know how to measure stuff or collect data.
      Engineering taught as abstract math/science exercise.
      Ignore benefit of direct measurement.
      Historical terms: Locke 101 or Bacon 101?
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      John Locke (1632-1704)
    • Failure 6: Inability to Visualize/Ideate
      Don’t know how to draw sketches or diagrams when helpful.
      Have trouble envisioning solutions.
      Graphics education greatly diminished.
      Historical terms: da Vinci or Monge 101.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Failure 7: Inability to Communicate
      • Finally finish the project.
      • Don’t know how to present or write for business.
      • “What we have here is a failure to communicate.”
      • Historical terms: Newman 101.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
      Paul Newman (1925-2008)
    • The Missing Basics vs. the Basics
      • Call these lacunae the missing basics (MBs) vs. “the basics” = math, sci, & eng sci.
      • Invoke great figures of intellectual history to underline their importance.
      • Enlarge the space of “rigor” by adding conceptual rigor (philosophy) to math/science rigor.
      • MBs unlock the three joys: joy of engineering, joy of community (working with others) & joy of learning.
      • Engineering involves MBs as much as the basics.
      • MBs help you with people.
      • MBs help you learn new stuff on your own and from others.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Why So Important Now?
      • The old paradigm was OK for WW2 & Cold War.
      • Then: Engineers did technically specialized work in domestic hierarchical organizations enhancing existing categories of product or service.
      • Now a creative era, a flat world.
      • Need category creators, not just category enhancers.
      • Now: Engineers do integrative work spanning specialties in global flat organizations making that which has never existed.
      • MBs and basics important like never before.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • Bottom Line
      • Have identified 7 “missing basics” of engin ed.
      • MBs unlock the three joys: joy of engineering, joy of community, joy of learning.
      • MBs expand notion of rigor beyond math & science to conceptual rigor usually in philosophy.
      • MBs help prepare you to be a linchpin in a creative era.
      • Will still take classes with plenty of math & science.
      • This class will help you in thinking more deeply about your math & science.
      • Will also help you in engineering effectiveness with customers and co-workers in a changing world.
      © David E. Goldberg 2010
    • The Missing Basics:What Engineers Don’t Learn & Why They Need to Learn It
      David E. GoldbergIllinois Foundry for Innovation in Engineering EducationUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbana, IL 61801 USAdeg@illinois.edu
      © David E. Goldberg 2010