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Administrative Services LO3

Administrative Services LO3

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    LO2 LO2 Presentation Transcript

    • Describe Factors Affecting the Administrative Assistant in the Work Environment Admin Services Outcome 2 © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Learning Outcomes
      • Changes in Today’s Business Environment.
      • Working Practices in Today’s Business Environment.
        • Full Time
        • Part Time
        • Flexi-Time
        • Job Share
        • Homeworking
        • Teleworking
        • Hot Desking
      • Contract Of Employment
      • Different Types of Contracts
      • Providing a Healthy & Safe Working Environment
      • Security Measures
      • Health & Safety Legislation
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Today’s Business Environment
      • The working practices in today’s business environment are in place to ensure that the needs of the employee are met.
      • As a result there are many different types of working practices which organisations now offer their employees.
      • The reasons why there has been a dramatic change in working practices are:
        • Changes in technology.
        • Changes in employee’s lifestyles – the return of working mothers for example.
        • Increased competition – organisations have to fight to get the best employees out there.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Benefits of the new Working Practices to an Organisation
      • The organisation benefits in many ways by offering their employees a working practice which best suits their needs:
        • There is lower staff turnover therefore the organisation saves money.
        • The employees feel valued therefore are motivated – this results in higher productivity for the organisation.
        • If the employees are happy in their working environment, then they are less likely to take time off work.
        • The organisation builds up an excellent reputation of looking after its employees therefore more and more will want to come and work for the organisation.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Benefits of the new Working Practices for the Employee
      • The employee benefits in many ways by receiving a working practice which best suits his/her needs:
        • The balance between work-life and home-life can be better achieved – it is easier to meet the challenges of work as well as commitments at home.
        • The employee will tend not to be as stressed if he/she is working hours suited to his/her needs.
        • The longer an employee stays with an organisation, the more opportunities he/she will receive to build up their skills and knowledge and progress in his/her career.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices in Today’s Business Environment
      • There are a variety of working practices which currently exist in today’s business environment:
        • Full-time
        • Part-time
        • Flexi-Time
        • Job Share
        • Homeworking
        • Teleworking
        • Hot Desking
      © Inspiring Education 2006 We are now going to discover what each of these working practices actually mean and analyse how they affect both the organisation and the employee.
    • Working Practices - Full Time
      • This type of working practice means that the employee works a specified number of hours.
      • Usually, this means that the employee works from 9 am until 5 pm.
      • In the UK it is reported that employees work the longest average full-time week – a grand total of 41 hours!
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Full Time Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • The organisation is able to build a relationship with its employees.
      • Employees are able to develop and grow by taking training courses.
      • The organisation will have a consistent workforce – less likely for there to be a high turnover.
      • It is expensive to offer employees full time contracts.
      • If an employee has a long term period of absence, then the organisation will need to hire someone to temporarily fill the position – this is also very expensive.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employee feels a great sense of security and is therefore motivated to do well.
      • The employee is more likely to be offered promotion.
      • The employee is able to develop his/her skills.
      • The employee is required to work a set amount of hours each week – this can make other commitments (family) very difficult to meet.
    • Working Practices - Part Time
      • This type of working practice means that the employee works an agreed amount of hours each week.
      • The employee will agree with his/her Manager what hours are to be worked.
      • Depending upon the nature of the job, this will determine the hours worked.
      • Examples of part time hours are:
        • 3 days a week.
        • 5 half days each week.
        • 2 full days and 2 half days.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Part Time Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • The employees who are focussed on their work for a shorter period of time tend to be very productive – the employees are able to give their full commitment and are not as tired of the tasks compared to an employee who works 5 full days a week.
      • Changes in society have resulted in organisations finding it very easy to recruit employees who wish to work this way.
      • If more and more people are working part time then more money will be required to train the extra staff – very expensive for the organisation.
      • Also, it could be more difficult for managers to supervise all employees if they are not in full time.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employee is able to get a good balance between work life and home life.
      • The employee will be more focussed working on tasks fewer days of the week therefore will be more motivated in his/her job.
      • The employee will receive pay lower than if he/she were working a full time job.
      • Many part time employees feel that they do not have a great status in the organisation – are perhaps devalued by senior management.
      • Difficult to attend meetings, training courses etc May miss out on opportunities.
    • Working Practices - Flexi Time
      • Flexi time means that the employee can be FLEXIBLE with his/her working hours.
      • The employee must work CORE hours – this means that during specific hours (for example 10 am – 12 noon and 2 pm – 4 pm) the employee must be present in the office.
      • The employee is able to decide when they start and finish as long as they work the minimum number of hours in a week.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Flexi Time Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • It is very easy to supervise the hours each employee is working as a computerised system can log when each employee has signed in and out of the building.
      • The organisation is able to build a reputation of offering flexibility to its employees.
      • Enabling employees to choose their own starting and finishing times reduces the need for them to take time off for appointments – they can now work around their own hours.
      • Managers have to ensure that when they say it is okay for a member of staff to have a flexi day that there is indeed enough personnel to cover the work for that afternoon or day.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employee will feel more motivated that he/she is in control of their own working hours.
      • The employee will be able to have a balance between work life and other commitments.
      • If the employee has a very demanding schedule and is working longer hours at the beginning of the month, then he/she will be able to build up flexi time so that they can have an afternoon or day off at the end of the month.
      • Some managers may not agree to flexi time being offered – this could cause resentment.
    • Working Practices - Job Share
      • This type of working practice means that two people share the duties and responsibilities of one full time job.
      • The employees will share the same workstation and other resources.
      • This type of working practice is always carried out on a voluntary basis i.e the employee(s) have requested the arrangement from his/her Line Manager.
      • The pay and benefits are shared between the two employees.
      • Often, existing employees who wish to start a family or simply reduce their working hours will request this arrangement so that they can continue their career with more suitable working hours.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Job Share Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • The organisation is able to retain good staff.
      • The employees, having asked for the arrangement, will be highly committed to ensuring it works.
      • If the employees do not communicate well with one another then important decisions may not be made and the standard of work could diminish.
      • If one employee is off for a long period of time this would mean that for half the week work was not being completed.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employees would be able to balance work life and home life.
      • The employees would be highly committed to doing a good job.
      • The employees may not agree who works which half of the week.
      • There may be an inappropriate handover time whereby important information is not communicated.
      • There may be duplication of work because responsibilities have not been split properly.
      • The employee only receives half of the pay and benefits.
    • Working Practices - Homeworking
      • The advancement in Information Communications Technology has led to a dramatic increase in the number of employees who now work from home.
      • The organisation equips the employee with all the required resources and the employee carries out his/her daily duties from home.
      • At times the employee will be required to travel into the office eg. Meetings, interviews, training course etc.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Teleworking
      • The advancement in Information Communications Technology has also resulted in more and more teleworkers.
      • Teleworkers rely heavily on the use of the Internet and other forms of electronic communications such as mobile phones and broadband.
      • Teleworkers can also work from home however they are more associated to those employees who have to travel a lot in their job.
      • For example:
        • Senior Executives who oversee a number of different organisations and have to visit on a regular basis for updates and meetings.
        • Sales Representatives who each day travel from one client’s offices to the next.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Homeworking & Teleworking Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • The organisation has to pay less on accommodation – lighting, workstations etc.
      • The employees may prefer to work from home and as a result be more productive.
      • If there was a fault with the IT then communications would be very difficult with the employee and important tasks may not be completed.
      • It is very difficult to supervise exactly how well the employee is working.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employee is able to balance work life and home life more easily.
      • The employee may feel more relaxed in his/her home environment and as a result be more productive.
      • It may be difficult for the employee to receive help to solve a problem if needed straight away.
      • The employee could feel very isolated and removed from the team ethos in the office.
      • The employee may miss out on important information regarding meetings.
    • Working Practices - Hot Desking
      • For those employees who are not based in the office, hot desks are created to enable them to book a workstation when they require to spend time in the office.
      • The employee is able to use the facilities of a workstation and have access to files and other resources however when finished all the resources must be cleared away so that the desk is available for another employee to use.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Working Practices - Hot Desking Effects on the Organisation and the Employee
      • The organisation is able to save money on resources as they are being shared by the employees and require less office space.
      • This type of system encourages employees to have a very disciplined approach to ensuring that all files etc are stored away correctly.
      • There may be a lot of arguments if employees wish to use the hot desks at the same time.
      • The system could become overbooked resulting in less productivity.
      © Inspiring Education 2006 THE ORGANISATION THE EMPLOYEE
      • The employee is able to use the resources he/she requires by booking a hot-desk.
      • The employee will benefit from being back in the team environment.
      • The employee may not be able to access a hot desk and waste a whole day.
    • Contract of Employment
      • So far the discussion has shown the different ways in which people can work.
      • Attention must now be given to HOW people work.
      • The first thing a person receives upon starting a job is a CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.
      • The purpose of a Contract of Employment is a legal agreement between the organisation and the employee stating the rights of the employee and his/her conditions of employment.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Features of a Contract of Employment
      • The following will be included in a Contract of Employment:
        • Details of the organisation.
        • Personal details of the employee.
        • The employee’s job title, role and responsibilities.
        • The amount of hours the employee is required to work each week/month.
        • The employee’s salary.
        • The working conditions: details relating to sick leave; holiday entitlements; discipline procedures etc.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • The Different Types of Job Contracts
      • There are a number of contracts which an organisation may offer:
      © Inspiring Education 2006 TYPES OF CONTRACT
      • PERMANENT
      • This means that the employee has a contract to work with the organisation all the time.
      • There is no end date on the contract.
      • TEMPORARY
      • This means that the employee’s contract can be terminated at any time.
      • This is often given to employees as a trial – if they get on well, a permanent contract may be offered.
      • FULL TIME
      • This means that the employee has a contract to work in the organisation for a specific number of hours.
      • full time hours in the UK averages at 41 hours per week.
      • PART TIME
      • This means that the employee works less than the full time hours.
      • FIXED TERM
      • This means that the employee works for a specific amount of time then leaves the organisation.
      • Very common in seasonal employment eg Christmas workers.
    • Providing a Healthy & Safe Working Environment
      • It is very important that all employees and visitors to an organisation feel safe at all times.
      • There are many different pieces of legislation which all organisations must follow to ensure that this is the case at all times.
      • It is important that the employer ensures that the organisation has a very clear Health & Safety Policy and that all employees are aware of what this is.
      • Employers must ensure that employees are trained on a regular basis and informed of any changes to the policies immediately.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • A Health & Safety Policy
      • A Health & Safety Policy will include the following:
        • The organisation’s commitment to Health & Safety.
        • Procedures for dealing with accidents and injuries.
        • Procedures for dealing with fire prevention.
        • Procedures for dealing with training all employees on health & safety issues.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Security Measures Taken By An Organisation
      • There is a number of security measures an organisation can take to ensure a secure working environment:
        • Staff sign in and sign out at the Reception to monitor staff movement.
        • Issue all employees and customers with an ID badge which will show they have been given permission to enter the building.
        • Use CCTV in and around the premises.
        • Employ security guards to monitor the Reception area and the surrounding areas of the premises.
        • Ensure that access to computers is controlled by issuing all employees with a unique username, password and log-on.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Health & Safety Legislation
      • The following pieces of legislation will now be studied:
        • The Offices, Shops & Railway Premises Act 1963.
        • The Health & Safety at Work Act 1974.
        • Health & Safety ( Display Screen Equipment ) Regulations 1992.
        • The Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981.
        • Fire Precautions (Places of Work) Regulations 1995.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • The Offices, Shops & Railway Premises Act 1963
      • This Act is designed to ensure that employers comply with the following:
        • A high standard of cleanliness at all times.
        • Appropriate heating, lighting and ventilation for employees to work in.
        • An adequate provision of toilets and cleaning areas.
        • Clean drinking water – many organisations now have water fountains based in each Department so that employees can access it at any time of the day.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • The Health & Safety at Work Act 1974
      • This Act is designed to ensure that EVERYONE in the organisation is provided with a safe working environment.
      • The Act outlines the following:
        • The responsibilities of the employer.
        • The responsibilities of the employee.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 – the EMPLOYER’S responsibilities
      • The employer must ensure that the following are provided in order to comply with legislation:
        • Look after employee’s welfare eg offer free eye tests.
        • Provide protective clothing where necessary. For example, on a building site all employees must wear protective hats and shoes; in a hospital all staff must wear gloves when treating patients.
        • Provide First Aid facilities. It is important that there are First Aiders within the workplace and that all First Aid kits are fully stocked.
        • Keep records of any accidents or incidents which occur.
        • Prepare a Health & Safety policy so that all staff are aware of the organisation's policies and procedures and know what to do in an emergency.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Health & Safety at Work Act 1974 – the EMPLOYEE’S responsibilities
      • All employees have responsibilities in ensuring that the legislation is followed at all times. Employees must ensure:
        • That they look after their own health and safety.
        • That they take care of their colleagues’ health & safety.
        • That they report any accidents or faulty pieces of equipment immediately.
        • That they cooperate at all times with their employer to make sure that the workplace is a healthy and safe environment at all times.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Health & Safety ( Display Screen Equipment ) Regulations 1992
      • This Act is designed to ensure that EVERYONE in the organisation is provided with a workstation that meets the needs of the employee and causes no harm.
      • The Act outlines the following:
        • The responsibilities of the employer.
        • The responsibilities of the employee.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • HASAW (DSE) 1992 – the EMPLOYER’S responsibilities
      • The employer must ensure that the following steps are taken to make sure that the legislation is being followed:
        • All workstations must meet the minimum requirements eg footrests; brightness control.
        • Employees should be offered free eye tests and glasses if required.
        • Ensure that equipment is safe to use.
        • Enforce breaks – these are essential as employees should not work at the PC constantly.
        • Supply anti-glare screens to prevent headaches.
        • Provide employees with appropriate training.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
      • All employees of the organisation have responsibilities in ensuring that the legislation is followed at all times. Employees must ensure:
        • That they use equipment properly.
        • That they use adjustable brightness control, colour etc to their individual needs.
        • That they use chairs correctly – chairs will have adjustable back rests.
        • That they use anti-glare screens for the VDUs.
      HASAW (DSE) 1992 – the EMPLOYEE’S responsibilities © Inspiring Education 2006
    • The Health & Safety (First Aid) Regulations 1981
      • This Act is designed to ensure that employers have first aid provision within the organisation at all times.
      • This requires the organisation to ensure the following:
        • That there is an adequate amount of First Aiders on site at any given time.
        • That there are suitable numbers of First Aid Kits available at any time – all kits must be appropriately stocked.
        • That all staff are trained on First Aid procedures:
          • Who to report the accident to.
          • Where First Aiders are located.
          • Emergency Numbers to phone – internally and externally.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • Fire Precautions (Places of Work) Regulations 1995
      • This Act is designed to ensure that employers have a sound fire prevention procedure set in place to protect all employees and visitors to the organisation.
      • The following steps should be taken by employers to ensure that the working environment is safe at all times:
        • Have regular checks by the Fire Brigade to assess fire extinguishers and fire drill procedures.
        • Send allocated staff on training courses so that they can become “Marshals” for the organisation – these employees will help co-ordinate the fire procedures.
        • Make sure that all exits are clear at all times.
        • Ensure that there are adequate provisions for disabled people so that they can evacuate safely when required to do so.
        • Train all employees how to look after their working environment and what to do in the case of a fire.
      © Inspiring Education 2006
    • The Role of the Health & Safety Executive (HSE)
      • It is important that Health & Safety Legislation is monitored on a regular basis to ensure that people are working in safe working environments at all times.
      • HSE inspectors have the authority to visit organisations at any time they wish without informing them that they are going to turn up!
      • If, upon inspection, the HSE is concerned at the organisation’s Health & Safety policies then the following steps can be taken:
        • The organisation may be asked to improve a specific factor eg. Ensuring all exit routes are cleared at all times or to improve their standard of equipment. The organisation would be given a certain period of time to achieve this in.
        • A fine may be given to the employer as a result of breaching the legislation, depending on the severity of the breach of legislation, the employer could be prosecuted and face imprisonment.
      © Inspiring Education 2006