Informationliteracy

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information literacy skills and college students

information literacy skills and college students

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  • 1. INFORMATION LITERACY Image credit: jeltovski at morguefile.com
  • 2. “ Information literacy is the key to solving problems, acting ethically, planning for the future and preparing for change.” Canadian Library Association
  • 3. Ex: Summarize the contributions of 2-3 major 18 th century French painters in a 5 page essay . “ I know a little about Matisse, but that's it!” 1.1 Define the information problem 1.2 Identify information needed “ I need to find out about 2 other major French painters and summarize what they did.” According to www.big6.com
  • 4. 2.1 Determine all possible sources 2.2 Select the best sources 3.1 Locate sources and find information Google? Database? Books?
  • 5. 4.1 Engage (e.g., read, hear, view, touch) 4.2 Extract relevant information 5.1 Organize from multiple sources 5.2 Present the information
  • 6. 6.1 Judge the product (effectiveness) 6.2 Judge the process (efficiency )
  • 7. BLOOM'S TAXONOMY Image credit:
  • 8. Characteristics of adult learners
      • They want practical applications of knowledge, such as professional development.
      • They can connect new information to past experiences.
  • 9. Types of information literacy* (Shapiro and Hughes, 1996) RESOURCE PUBLISHING EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SOCIO-STRUCTURAL TOOL CRITICAL RESEARCH
  • 10.
      • Form,
      • location
      • access
      • methods
    Library databases Print books e-books Specialized search engines Library of Congress classification system Reputable websites RESOURCE LITERACY
  • 11.
      • Format & publish ideas
      • electronically
    blogs podcasts websites Print and online articles PUBLISHING LITERACY
  • 12.
      • How information
      • is socially situated
      • and produced
    government business social networks social networks schools SOCIO-STRUCTURAL LITERACY
  • 13. Understand & use IT research tools Quantitative analysis software RESEARCH LITERACY
  • 14.
      • Understand & use
      • software, hardware
      • and multimedia
    networking multimedia TOOL LITERACY
  • 15.
      • Evaluate
      • human and social strengths;
      • weaknesses, potentials and limits;
      • and benefits and costs
      • of IT
    history politics culture philosophy CRITICAL LITERACY
  • 16.
      • Adapt to, understand, evaluate and use emerging innovations in IT
    EMERGING TECHNOLOGY LITERACY
  • 17. My definition of information literacy:
      • The ability to access, navigate,
      • evaluate and synthesize information
      • from a variety of resources to make
      • decisions .
  • 18. Types of information literacy
      • TRADITIONAL : Ability to read
      • PERSONAL: Health/Career/Financial
      • SOCIAL/POLITICAL: Awareness of larger context on information and its impact on the world
      • ACADEMIC: Fi nd research; synthesize information with existing knowledge
      • TECHNOLOGICAL —Navigate new technology
  • 19. EVALUATING WEB RESOURCES
  • 20. WHY IS EVALUATING INTERNET INFORMATION IMPORTANT?
  • 21. YOUR HEALTH Health image by dani simmonds at morguefile.com
    • 53% of Americans have gone online to get health information.
    • More Americans go to the Internet to solve problems rather than consult experts.
  • 22.
    • 40% of adult Internet users use online banking (Pew Internet Study, 2006).
    • Identity theft is extremely common.
      • (image by Dani Simmonds at morguefile.com)
  • 23. CAREER Career
    • In a survey of 100 executive recruiters in 2005, 77 had used Google to check on applicants. 37 of them turned down applicants based on what they found.
    • 17% of Internet users (and 11% of all Americans) say theyknow someone who has been disciplined or fired because of his or her use of the Internet on the job.
  • 24. You as a brand
      • A positive online presence can
      • help your career.
      • What image do you want to portray?
  • 25. How long can your information stay online? (beware of Google cache!)
  • 26. EVALUATION FACTORS:
      • AUTHORITY
      • CURRENCY
      • OBJECTIVITY
      • ACCURACY
      • APPEARANCE
  • 27. AUTHORITY
  • 28. Authority Checklist
      • What individual or organization is in charge
      • of the website content (besides the webmaster)?
      • What are their credentials and how long have
      • they been in the field?
      • What kind of publicity have they generated?
  • 29. AUTHORITY: What to look for
      • About Us/Contact Us —should at least be on first page if not every page of site
      • Check Better Business Bureau or type in company name + “scam” into Google
      • Use Whois.com to see who owns the site**
      • Sites requiring private information such as credit card numbers should have an “https” in their URL, not just “http”
      • Evaluating Internet Information. http://www.lib.vt.edu/help/instruct/evaluate/evaluating.html
  • 30. WHOIS NOT FOOLPROOF —Owner can use privacy or masking option .
  • 31. LACK OF AUTHORITY: www.martinlutherking.org who's in charge?
  • 32. Actual source..... a white supremacy group
  • 33. BRITISH BROADCASTING CORPORATION ...authority check...
  • 34. Keep scrolling....
  • 35. There it is.
  • 36. C U R R E N C Y Image credit:wikimedia.org
  • 37. CURRENCY CHECKLIST
      • HOW OFTEN DOES CONTENT CHANGE?
      • HOW CURRENT IS INFORMATION?
      • LAST SITE UPDATE ?
  • 38. Currency: What to look for
      • Site and blog updates
      • Interactive content/user input
      • News bulletins
      • Discussion forums (depending on site)
  • 39. AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR FINANCIAL PROFESSIONALS (CURRENCY--site updated regularly)
  • 40. Objectivity [insert graphic] OBJECTIVITY
  • 41. OBJECTIVITY Look for....
      • Factual, impartial language VS. emotions & generalizations
      • Facts and figures VS. broad assertions & anecdotes
      • Multiple viewpoints VS. one opinion and ADS
      • Good word choice & usage VS. sloppy proofreading
  • 42. BBC: Capital Punishment Site (multiple viewpoints, non-biased text, appropriate language)
  • 43. Fox news website (biased language)
  • 44. ACCURACY : Photo courtesy of
  • 45. ACCURACY CHECKLIST
      • Can the information on the site be confirmed elsewhere?
      • Is the information edited and checked before it goes online?
      • Is the information error-free ?
  • 46. WebMD: drug information can be researched and verified
  • 47. The Flat Earth Society (not so accurate)
  • 48. APPEARANCE
  • 49. APPEARANCE LIST
      • FIRST GLANCE:
      • Multiple ads & pop-ups BAD
      • Long flash intro w/o skip option BAD
      • Quality graphics GOOD
      • Harmonious colors GOOD
      • ACCESSIBILITY:
      • Text-only or other version GOOD
      • “ Alt” tags GOOD
      • Download options GOOD
      • Cross-browser friendly GOOD
  • 50. APPEARANCE LIST
      • USER-FRIENDLY:
      • Consistent navigation on each page? GOOD
      • Site index? GOOD
      • Contact Us link? GOOD
      • CONTENT:
      • Poor Punctuation BAD
      • Poor Grammar BAD
      • Good spelling GOOD
      • Consistent font size & type GOOD
  • 51. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS website is user-friendly: consistent navigation, no ads
  • 52. Wikipedia: Anyone can edit it. They also solicit donations.
  • 53.
      • SO....WHAT
      • ABOUT
      • WIKIPEDIA?
  • 54. WIKIPEDIA: THE GOOD ...
    • Great info on pop culture and tech
    • 99% of contributors =dedicated few
    • Links to good resources
  • 55. WIKIPEDIA: THE BAD (AND THE UGLY) . ...
    • The other 1%
    • No expert editing
    • Short on academic information
    “ Breaking Bad” photo credit: amc.com
  • 56. WEB EVALUATION FACTORS:
      • AUTHORITY
      • Who is responsible for the website; are they qualified?
      • CURRENCY
      • How current is the information?
      • OBJECTIVITY
      • Are there facts, figures and multiple points of view?
      • ACCURACY
      • Can statements be verified? Are they true?
      • APPEARANCE
      • Professionalism and accessibility
  • 57. Site evaluation sheets: 1. Decide which site is reputable and which is not (one is a hoax site). 2. Give 2 examples for each of why or why not that include authority, accuracy, objectivity, appearance or currency . Example: Site A is not a good resource because.... 2-3 minutes.
  • 58.  
  • 59.  
  • 60. Site evaluation: possible answers.
    • Dihydrogen Monoxide— NOT reputable. Why not?
    • Possible answers:
    • LOTS of advertising (APPEARANCE, OBJECTIVITY, AUTHORITY), including a Southpark ad (???)
    • No https, only http (AUTHORITY)
    • “ May not be able to reply to e-mail” (AUTHORITY)
    • Bottom of page: “content veracity not implied” (AUTHORITY)
    • Editorial (OBJECTIVITY)
    • Science News—reputable. Why?
    • Possible answers:
    • Good quality graphics; consistent font (APPEARANCE)
    • Regular issues, RSS feeds, e-mail alerts (CURRENCY)
    • Facts that can be checked--Peru volcano (OBJECTIVITY)
  • 61. WEB EVALUATION FACTORS (review):
      • AUTHORITY
      • Who is responsible for the website; are they qualified?
      • CURRENCY
      • How current is the information?
      • OBJECTIVITY
      • Are there facts, figures and multiple points of view?
      • ACCURACY
      • Can statements be verified? Are they true?
      • APPEARANCE
      • Professionalism and accessibility
  • 62. HAPPY HUNTING! Picture courtesy of Jubsen at morguefile.com