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Kieran Modern Olympics Keynote
 

Kieran Modern Olympics Keynote

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Kieran Modern Olympics Keynote Kieran Modern Olympics Keynote Presentation Transcript

  • The Modern Olympics
  • The Modern Olympics By Kieran Cotter
  • Who is the Baron Pierre de Coubertin?
  • Who is the Baron Pierre de Coubertin?Baron de Coubertin, was born in Paris on 1 January 1863. He wasthe youngest of four children. He died at the age of 74, onSeptember 2, 1937, of a stroke.He chose to voice his idea to an international meeting of top athletesfrom nine countries in 1984. This group of friends and colleaguesbecame know as the International Olympic committee. He tried topull countries athletes to the games.Pierre de Coubertin wasinstrumental in establishing many of the Olympic traditions thatcontinue to this day - the five rings, the Olympic flag, the oath andmotto. He produced many writings on the subject of sport andeducation - one of his most famous quotes is “The important thingin the Olympic Games is not winning but taking part. Just as in life,the aim is not to conquer but to struggle well.”
  • Olympic flag
  • Olympic flagThe flag has five interlocking rings (blue, yellow, black,green, and red) on a white ground. The rings representthe five parts of the world that were joined together inthe Olympic movement: Africa, the Americas, Asia,Australia and Europe. Baron de Coubertin designed theflag of the Olympics in 1913-1914.The olympic flag was first used in the 1920 Olympicgames in Antwerp, Belgium
  • Olympic flagThe flag has five interlocking rings (blue, yellow, black,green, and red) on a white ground. The rings representthe five parts of the world that were joined together inthe Olympic movement: Africa, the Americas, Asia,Australia and Europe. Baron de Coubertin designed theflag of the Olympics in 1913-1914.The olympic flag was first used in the 1920 Olympicgames in Antwerp, Belgium
  • The Olympic Torch
  • The Olympic Torch
  • The Olympic Torch
  • The Olympic TorchThe tradition of the Olympic flame began during the ancient Olympic Games, over2700 years ago in Greece. A flame was lit for each Olympics, every four years, and itburned throughout the games. The flame symbolized the death and rebirth of Greekheroes. There was no torch relay in the ancient Olympics. The first torch relay tookplace at the 1936 games in Berlin, Germany.For each Olympics, a new flame isstarted in the ancient Olympic stadium in Olympia, Elis, Greece, using a parabolicmirror to focus the rays of the Sun. This flame begins its Olympic Torch Relay bytouring Greece. The flame is normally taken to the country where the games will beheld (usually by airplane). Following that, the flame is then carried around the countrywhere the games are to be held, using a series of torches carried by people running,walking, riding horses and camels, scuba diving, and using other means of humanconveyance. The last runner uses a torch to light the large Olympic torch which burnsthroughout the games. The flame is extinguished during the closing ceremony. A newOlympic torch is designed for each of the games.
  • Olympic Mascot
  • Olympic Mascot
  • Olympic MascotThe one-eyed Wenlock ^ and Mandeville ^ - who wereborn from the "last drops of steel" from the OlympicStadium - were the product of an 18-month creativeprocess using more than 40 focus groups.
  • Olympic Oath
  • Olympic Oath
  • Olympic Oath
  • Olympic Oath In the name of all competitors, I promise that we shall take part in these Olympic Games, respecting and abiding by the rules that govern them, in the true spirit of sportsmanship, for the glory of sport and the honour of our teams." Written by Baron de Coubertin, the oath is taken by an athlete from the host nation while holding a corner of the Olympic flag. The athletes oath was first taken by Belgianfencer Victor Boin at the 1920 Antwerp Games. A judge from the host country also speaks the oath, with slightly different wording.
  • Creed and Motto
  • Creed and Motto
  • Creed and Motto
  • Creed and Motto A judge from the host country recites the Olympic creed, which appears on the big screen during the Opening Ceremony:"The most important thing in the Olympic games is not to win but to take part, just as the most importantthing in life is not the triumph, but the struggle. The essential thing is not to have conquered, but to have foughtwell." Baron de Coubertin adopted this creed after hearing it from the bishop of central Pennsylvania, Ethelbert Talbot, when he spoke at a service for Olympic athletes during the 1908 London Games. Although there have been many permutations of this basic message throughout the history of the Games, the creed above, which was introduced at the 1972 Olympic Games in Munich, is still used today.The Olympic motto is, "Citius, Altius, Fortius," which means "Swifter, Higher, Stronger."
  • Host Cities
  • Host CitiesThere has been 29 summer olympics in 22different cities. Several places have held theolympics more than once including Londonwhich has held the games 3 times including these2012 games. Other places include: Athens 2,Paris 2, Los Angeles, 2. In addition Stockholmheld 1 Olympic games and the Equestriansection of another games.
  • Ceremonies
  • CeremoniesThere is the Opening Ceremony, the MedalsCeremonies and the Closing Ceremony.There are many Medals ceremonies as there aremany sports.The ceremonies always follow the same protocolbut each host adds their own feel. The splendor,organization and WOW factor is greatlyanticipated by countries all over the world.
  • Malcolm Eddie Champion
  • Malcolm Eddie ChampionMalcolm Eddie Champion (12 November 1883 – 27 July 1939) was New Zealands first Olympic gold medallist,and the first swimmer to represent New Zealand at an Olympic Games. He won a gold medal in the 4x200mfreestyle relay at the 1912 summer Olympics in Stockholm, Sweden as part of a combined team with Australia,competing as Australasia. Champion was born in 1883 on Norfolk Island. Between 1901 and 1914, Championwon thirty-two New Zealand national titles, at one point holding the titles for every distance between 220 yards(200 m) and one mile (1.6 km). In 1911 was the long-distance champion of England and the 880 yd (800 m)champion of the Thames. He had also represented Australasia at the 1911 Festival of the Empire at The Crystalpalace, an early forerunner to the Commonwealth games, where he finished third in the mile race. Due to thefinancial difficulties faced by the New Zealand Olympic Committee, his swimming club had to fundraise for himand organize loans so that he could travel to the 1912 Stockholm Olympics. At the Olympics, Champion carriedthe flag for the Australasian delegation. Champion was originally slated to compete in the 400 m and 1500 mfreestyle events. He finished second in his 400 m heat behind Harold Hardwick and before finishing fourth in hissemi-final to be eliminated. In the 1500 m event, he placed second in both his heat and semifinal, beforeabandoning in the final after 600 m. A sudden ear infection to Bill Longworth resulted in Champion beingpromoted to the 4x200m freestyle relay team. In the final on 15 July, Champion swam the second leg, and startedequal with the American swimmer after Cecil Healys first leg before building up a 10 m lead in his leg. LesBoardman extended the lead to 15 m before Harold Hardwick held off Duke Kahanamoku to claim the goldmedal in the world record time of 10:11.6. The final was the third time that a world record had been set in thatevent at the Stockholm games, the first two times occurring on 12 July with the United States team swimming10:26.4, only to be bettered later that day by the Australasian team who swam 10:14.0 (the United States teamwon the silver medal in the final). Champion was New Zealands only Olympic gold medallist in swimming until1996, when Danyon Loader won in the 200 m and 400 m freestyle events at the Atlanta Olympics. In 1990Champion became an inaugural inductee into the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame. In 2005 the winning relayteam was inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame, making Champion the only non-Australian inductee.