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Cell Respiration (part 1)
 

Cell Respiration (part 1)

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    Cell Respiration (part 1) Cell Respiration (part 1) Presentation Transcript

    • Objective: Food stores chemical energy Procedure: 1. Go over homework 2. Lecture 3. Concept check questions Homework: Write a paragraph comparing and contrasting energy conversion in a car vs. energy conversion in your cells Bell-work: Define food for me in chemical terms. What was in your lunch today? Now describe it in terms of the classes of organic molecules it contains. Go back to chapter 5 (honors – 3) for help. October 24, 2006
    • Putting Chemical Energy to Work
      • In cell respiration, complex molecules are broken down and energy is released
      • C 6 H 12 O 6 + O 2  CO 2 + H 2 O + ATP
      • Note that glucose had high potential energy that was released during the reaction
    • Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) is a Nucleotide This is not ATP, its just an example of nucleotide structure
    • Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) How chemical energy is stored: Energy + ADP + Pi  ATP How chemical energy is used: ATP  ADP + Pi + Energy
    • Energy Conversion
      • Remember, whenever energy is converted, some of the energy becomes unusable (heat)
      • Heat can keep your body warm, but it can no longer be used in the chemical reactions important to your metabolism
    • Sitting still in class, you radiate as much heat as a 100W light bulb!
    • A calorie is the amount of energy required to raise the temperture of 1g of water by 1 degree C By measuring the increase in water temperature, you can calculate the number of calories in any food 1,000 calories = 1 kilocalorie Because most food contains a lot of calories, kilocalories are the measurement you find on a nutritional label Units of Energy in Food