Gel 103
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Gel 103

on

  • 181 views

Lab/Field Assignment

Lab/Field Assignment
Geology 103
Prof Mark Lawler
Spring 2013

Statistics

Views

Total Views
181
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
181
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Gel 103 Gel 103 Presentation Transcript

    • By Amber WestbrookLake Tahoe Basin
    • The Formation of Lake Tahoe andthe Basin…“The Lake Tahoe Basin was formed by geologic block (normal) faulting about2 to 3 million years ago.”(Facts About Lake Tahoe. (2012, December 13). In USGS. Retrieved June 15, 2013)“Modern Lake Tahoe was shaped and landscaped by the scouring glaciersduring the Ice Age (the Great Ice Age began a million or more years ago).”(Facts About Lake Tahoe. (2012, December 13). In USGS. Retrieved June 15, 2013)These 2 geologic events are what is responsible for the beautiful Lake Tahoeand the basin that we all love.This picture is FallenLeaf Lake in the LakeTahoe Basin
    • More on Lake Tahoe Tahoe has some of the most beautiful sunsets in the summer due tothe afternoon clouds that cover the sky!
    • Lake Tahoe Landscape I took this picture on the East shore of LakeTahoe, as you can see the water’s edge issurrounded by Igneous rocks, mostlyGranite.These rocks are herefrom volcanic activitythat occurred over onmillion years ago!This picture was taken towards the topof Echo Summit. The remaining stump isan old growth Jeffery Pine Tree,estimated at 500 years old!Jeffery pines are one of the mostcommon trees in the Tahoe Area. Thistree provides shelter and food for manybirds and small animals. (Plant Guide. (2006, June22). In USDA. Retrieved June 15, 2013,)
    • Geology Rocks!•This is an Igneous lava rock, called the Scoria.•These are formed when the magma eruptsfrom a pluton and the lava cools rapidly, withinhours. (Formation, Classification, and Identification of IgneousRocks. (2000, September 29). In An Introduction to Igneous Rocks.Retrieved June 16, 2013)•When rapid cooling occurs no minerals areable to form, so the results are Scoria andobsidian.I took this picture in the Fallen Leafarea while hiking.
    • Geology Rocks Again!oThe picture to the right is also belongs to theIgneous rock family. It is called Granite.oThis is the most common rock found here in LakeTahoe due to the faulting that occurred heremillions of years ago.oGranite is formed when magma cools veryslowly, over thousands to millions of years. Thisslow process allows the minerals to grow largeenough to see. (Formation, Classification, and Identification ofIgneous Rocks. (2000, September 29). In An Introduction to Igneous Rocks.Retrieved June 16, 2013)I took this picture while hiking at Fallen LeafLake as well.
    • Crawdads (Crayfish)This baby crawdad wasabout 1.5 inches long and Ifound him in the river aboveFallen Leaf Lake.Crawdads evolved from a marine ancestor and I could not find a reliablesource for what the exact organism was that they evolved from."These crayfish were burrowing much like modern ones in the same areatoday, showing that their behaviors havent changed that much in more than100 million years.“ (Ancient Crayfish Fossils Unravel Evolution Mystery. (2010, October 28). In NationalGeographic. Retrieved June 16, 2013)
    • More fun facts about Crawdads!Crawdads live in either slow moving wateror stagnant water usually around rocks. Theyare not native to Lake Tahoe, but have beenhere for many years.The cannot survive in salt water eventhough they evolved from a marine ancestor.“In North America alone, two families, 12genera, and at last count, over 390 speciescan be found” (Fetzner, Jr., J. W. (1996). BIOCHEMICALSYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE CRAYFISH GENUSORCONECTES (DECAPODA: CAMBARIDAE) . In JOURNAL OFCRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 16(1): 111-141, 1996. Retrieved June 16, 2013,
    • Duck Eggs in a Nest!I found these Duck eggs in this nest atBaldwin Beach! I saw the mother duckfly away from the nest.•These eggs belong to a Green-Winged Teal duck, scientifically known asAnas crecca. (Roof, J. 1999. "Anas crecca" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed June 24, 2013)•After doing an extensive amount of research, it is unclear who theancestor is of the Green-Winged Teal ducks is.•These ducks like in marsh land or wetlands, they eat seeds, and themake their nests on the ground. (Davies, I. (n.d.). Green-winged Teal. In The Cornell Lab ofOrnithology. Retrieved June 16, 2013,)This is a pictureof what themother lookedlike.
    • Green-Winged TealsThese ducks are dabbler ducks ,andthey are the second most huntedducks in the United States next toMallards.They lay an average of 10 creamy,white eggs per season. Theirincubation period is about23 days.In the wild, Green-winged teals livean average of 243 months.The female builds the nest while themale watches, and once finish themale abandons her. (Roof, J. 1999. "Anascrecca" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. AccessedJune 24, 2013)
    • Lily pads and Water Lilies•“The leaf stem is hollow andtransports air from the surface tothe underwater rhizomes whichcan grow to a massive size.” (Tan, R.(2001). Water Lily (Nymphaea): info fact sheet,photos. In Water Lily . Retrieved June 16, 2013,)•Water lilies grow very well incalm, fresh water. Like that ofmarshes, ponds, and edges ofcalm lakes.• The scientific name for the water lily family is Nymphaeaceae. ((n.d.). In Wkipedia.Retrieved June 15, 2013)•“Modern genetic analyses by the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group researchers hasconfirmed its basal position among flowering plants.” ((n.d.). In Wkipedia. Retrieved June 15,2013)•The genus of lily pads we have here in Lake Tahoe belongs to the Nymphaea,which contains about 35 species and they are found in the NorthernHemisphere.
    • References Formation, Classification, and Identification of Igneous Rocks. (2000, September 29).In An Introduction to Igneous Rocks. Retrieved June 16, 2013, fromhttp://csmres.jmu.edu/geollab/fichter/IgnRx/Introigrx.html Facts About Lake Tahoe. (2012, December 13). In USGS. Retrieved June 15, 2013, fromhttp://tahoe.usgs.gov/facts.html Fetzner, Jr., J. W. (1996). BIOCHEMICAL SYSTEMATICS AND EVOLUTION OF THECRAYFISH GENUS ORCONECTES (DECAPODA: CAMBARIDAE) . In JOURNAL OFCRUSTACEAN BIOLOGY, 16(1): 111-141, 1996. Retrieved June 16, 2013, fromhttp://iz.carnegiemnh.org/fetzner/pubs/Fetzner_1996_JCB16(1).pdf Ancient Crayfish Fossils Unravel Evolution Mystery. (2010, October 28). In NationalGeographic. Retrieved June 16, 2013 Roof, J. 1999. "Anas crecca" (On-line), Animal Diversity Web. Accessed June 24, 2013 athttp://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Anas_crecca/ Davies, I. (n.d.). Green-winged Teal. In The Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Retrieved June 16,2013, from http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Green-winged_Teal/lifehistory Tan, R. (2001). Water Lily (Nymphaea): info fact sheet, photos. In Water Lily . RetrievedJune 16, 2013, from http://www.naturia.per.sg/buloh/plants/water_lily.htm Nymphaeaceae. (n.d.). In Wkipedia. Retrieved June 15, 2013, fromhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nymphaeaceae Plant Guide. (2006, June 22). In USDA. Retrieved June 15, 2013, fromhttp://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_pije.pdf