Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Scripting powerpoint
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Scripting powerpoint

  • 2,047 views
Published

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
2,047
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7

Actions

Shares
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • http://www.scriptwritingsecrets.com/contents.htm 5-10minsWhat have you noticed? Been able to pick out?
  • 5minshttp://www.weeklyscript.com/Pirates%20Of%20The%20Caribbean.txtWhat have you noticed about the Character names is the script?How is dialogue presented?Any initial thoughts about the layout of the script?
  • Initial thoughts?Scene Headings always appear in UPPERCASEYou want to keep your scene headings to one line if possible.
  • At first they may look similar, but notice the sections of the scene headings and they start to feel the same.What have you noticed?What can you guess by the headings?
  • INT.- interiorEXT. – exteriorINT./EXT. (scene starts outside- moves inside)You don’t have to do it this way, you could just change the headline when appropriate.
  • What does the next part tell us?The next part of the scene heading tells you where you are, generally. You want to keep these consistent, so you always refer to the place names in the same terms- this is so the reader will easily know where they are placed, and if you had to film you would know what sets/props you needed.
  • The specific area of the setting which is being used.Sometimes you won’t need this part if it doesn’t matter about the specific location.
  • 10minsWhat does this next part mean?Day and Night are most common,Sunset and Sunrise, Dusk and Dawn (awkward)The indicator ‘continuing’
  • 2 mins writing3 mins sharing
  • 5minsAnother word for these?Why might you use a lot of these in your scripts?What might happen if you use too many in your script?EditsThere are so many of these… but the important thing to remember is DON’T USE THEM! It you start a new scene, then you will know that it has ‘CUT TO:’Not your job to direct, but to tell a story
  • Which one would be in a script? Why?The difference? The first one shows it, the second one tells it. We can't see a character thinking. But we know that characters who are thinking will behave in a certain way. Describe the behaviour, not theunseeable mental process. In Action, you have more room to make your writing creative than you do in other elements, but I recommend you use your creativity to tell the story well, not to show off your vocabulary or prose technique. You want the reader to be impressed with and immersed in the story, not hung up on you.
  • 10mins (3slides)2mins sharingWrite me the actions for how to script this image.
  • 5mins2mins writing own2mins sharingWhich is the correct one? Why do you think this?Notice the ‘continuing’ parenthetical, this is used when a character’s dialogue is split by action.Write your own version.
  • What is the extension?What are they telling the reader?
  • 5 mins2 mins sharingWrite me an example of a voice over being used. If you want to write actions then remember to follow the ACTION rules.

Transcript

  • 1. • Annotate and analyse a script for a film of the same genre as your own. • Write up the features of a script onto your blog IN YOUR OWN WORDS. You can use your script analysis from class to support you. Homework
  • 2. Action Parentheticals Scene Headings Dialogue Transition Character Name Dual-Dialogue Extension Keywords (see what you can label)
  • 3. Monday 11th November 2013 Scripts LO: To demonstrate understanding of the key terms associated with script writing.
  • 4. FADE IN: EXT. CARIBBEAN SEA - DAY A grey, impenetrable wall of fog. From somewhere comes the FAINT SOUND of a LITTLE GIRL'S VOICE, singing, slow tempo, almost under her breath. YOUNG ELIZABETH (O.S.) Yo, ho, yo, ho, a pirate's life for me, Yo, ho, yo, ho, it's a pirate's life for me... Layout
  • 5. The scene heading tells us where the scene takes place. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY Scene Heading
  • 6. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY INT. ANSLOW FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN – CONTINUING INT./EXT. CONNER AEROSPACE, CONNER’S OFFICE NIGHT Scene Heading
  • 7. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY INT. ANSLOW FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN – CONTINUING INT./EXT. CONNER AEROSPACE, CONNER’S OFFICE NIGHT Scene Heading
  • 8. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY INT. ANSLOW FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN – CONTINUING INT./EXT. CONNER AEROSPACE, CONNER’S OFFICE NIGHT Scene Heading
  • 9. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY INT. ANSLOW FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN – CONTINUING INT./EXT. CONNER AEROSPACE, CONNER’S OFFICE NIGHT Scene Heading
  • 10. EXT. MILLY’S HOUSE, BACK DOOR - DAY INT. ANSLOW FARMHOUSE, KITCHEN – CONTINUING INT./EXT. CONNER AEROSPACE, CONNER’S OFFICE NIGHT Scene Heading
  • 11. Write down some scene headings either for your normal day, or made up (it’s up to you!) Scene Heading
  • 12. • CUT TO: • PAN TO: • FADE OUT: • WIPE TO: • DISSOLVE TO: • PULL BACK TO REVEAL: Transitions
  • 13. Action is also called "business" or "description." It's what we see on the screen or stage. It describes, in the most visual way it can, what happens. Action
  • 14. Example 1 Mark walks down the hall. He looks in the bedroom and, seeing nothing, scratches his head. He continues down the hall with a curious expression on his face Action Example 2 Mark walks down the hall. He thinks there might be something in the bedroom, so he looks in. He wonders why he doesn't see anything and scratches his head. "Hmmm," he thinks and then continues down the hall.
  • 15. Action
  • 16. BOB (sarcastic) A parenthetical is a direction Of course I love you. to the Actor about how to read the dialogue. MARTHA (trying not to explode) Can’t you be serious for once? (a beat, then) Wait, who are you? Parenthetical
  • 17. Example 1 Example 2 Zeke Zeke I don’t think you should stay I don’t think you should stay. (he cocks his shotgun) We don’t want you here. He cocks his shotgun. Zeke (continuing) We don’t want you here. Parenthetical
  • 18. DR. WATSON (O.S.) Help! I’m trapped in here! JOHN (V.O.) I didn’t want him to know I was here. Extension
  • 19. This is a technical indication about the character’s dialogue, placed to the right of the Character Name. (O.S.): Off screen (V.O.): Voice over / (O.C.): Off camera http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oL7PSlUuWPs Extension
  • 20. Dual Dialogue
  • 21. • How GENRE is shown through the script. • Areas which you think differs from the actual intro of the film. • Parts in which the script has been written with grabbing the audiences attention in mind. Annotate the following…