<ul><li>Discuss the ways in which your thriller incorporates generic conventions, identify specific scenes. </li></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Does the use of conventions indicate what sub-genre or hybrid genre your thriller is? </li></ul><ul><li>With the u...
<ul><li>What are the social groups represented in terms of gender, age, class, race .etc? </li></ul><ul><li>Well, the bent...
<ul><li>Would this be something that could be produced by a major Hollywood studio, if yes then why? Is it similar to exis...
<ul><li>Why would it be released? Does it offer opportunities for franchises, sequels or merchandising? </li></ul><ul><li>...
<ul><li>Consider the age and gender of your target and audience. Link this to the narrative and style of your film. </li><...
<ul><li>How did you attract/address your audience? Link this into your audience profile (I.e. what age and gender they are...
<ul><li>What other films are similar to yours, who do they appeal to?  </li></ul><ul><li>The opening sequence very much re...
<ul><li>Who is the audience asked to put themselves in the position of, what are they being allowed to witness? </li></ul>...
<ul><li>What were the strengths and weaknesses of the camera equipment? </li></ul><ul><li>Well, Richard and I spent some t...
<ul><li>Were there any problems you faced in the filming process? How did you resolve this issue? </li></ul><ul><li>When i...
<ul><li>Did you get to use new equipment that enhances your thriller? </li></ul><ul><li>The cameras that we used were of s...
<ul><li>Discuss the planning stage, the research into the genre. </li></ul><ul><li>Well, for a start, in class we watched ...
<ul><li>We showed around 10 people of 15 and above (the oldest being around 50). We got a mixed bag of comments, one of th...
 
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Tom Abraham Evaluation

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Tom Abraham Evaluation

  1. 2. <ul><li>Discuss the ways in which your thriller incorporates generic conventions, identify specific scenes. </li></ul><ul><li>At the end of the forest scene, when the teenage boys turn round, you see the shock on their faces in response to what is apparently before them, but you don’t see the dead body. In my opinion this makes the film a little classier, and more in the thriller boundaries instead of the horror/thriller boundaries as you don’t need the blunt gore at the beginning of the film. </li></ul><ul><li>How does your thriller develop or challenge these conventions? </li></ul><ul><li>From the beginning of the film, the main character is the “bent cop” in the office. Even though he may come across as the good guy, he is actually the antagonist of the story, as you aren’t supposed to know who the killer is, but the story of the “bent cop”. Also, we challenge conventions in the fact that the witness and sub-main characters are not middle aged males, but are actually teenage boys. This challenges the conventions that the hero and protagonist is always a middle aged man, but it also would make the film appeal to the younger generation. </li></ul>
  2. 3. <ul><li>Does the use of conventions indicate what sub-genre or hybrid genre your thriller is? </li></ul><ul><li>With the use of the suspicious bent cop and you not seeing the murder, the genre of the film could be considered as a Thriller, then again, seeing as there is a murder in a forest, similar to “the silence of the lambs” the sub-genre could be a horror/thriller. </li></ul><ul><li>Does your use of conventions indicate what other thrillers have influenced your work? If so, then be specific with examples. </li></ul><ul><li>Personally, I feel that the opening shots of the corporate buildings remind me of the opening sequence to “Get Carter”. It seems very blunt, the sky is very greyed out and the atmosphere seems very cold. Also, the whole progression of the plotline is very “X-Files” like, it all starts off very normal and then something goes drastically wrong. </li></ul>
  3. 4. <ul><li>What are the social groups represented in terms of gender, age, class, race .etc? </li></ul><ul><li>Well, the bent cop is male, which is quite generic in thriller films. Class wise, you can’t really tell. The clothes that the teenagers are wearing are fairly good quality, so it shows that they are not from a poor background. </li></ul><ul><li>Is gender represented in a stereotypical way? I.e. men dominant and women passive. </li></ul><ul><li>There is only one female character in the opening sequence and that is the victim, who is walking her dog. She isn’t really seen to be passive. It could be said that the “bent cop” is quite a dominant male but it is hard to tell. </li></ul><ul><li>How does this link to the target audience? </li></ul><ul><li>The use of female and male characters wasn’t really an issue in the opening sequence; we always wanted it to be a woman walking the dog, as it is more common to see a woman walking her dog than a male walking his. Other than that we seemed to just use the available actors/actresses that we had, regardless of their sex. </li></ul>c
  4. 5. <ul><li>Would this be something that could be produced by a major Hollywood studio, if yes then why? Is it similar to existing products? </li></ul><ul><li>Nowadays, you are more likely to find typical American thriller films produced by major Hollywood studios, for instance, they will all have an American cast, and the films would be set in America. For that reason, our film is different to the other existing Hollywood products, as it is a British Thriller. The opening sequence is similar to “Get Carter”, so as previously mentioned, it is linked/influenced to that. The plot line is similar to the sort that you may find in Hollywood though, so from that aspect, yes it probably could be produced by a major Hollywood studio. </li></ul><ul><li>Would it be a TV Movie/arthouse film/internet only release? </li></ul><ul><li>I think that this film will be a TV Movie release, it isn’t ‘random’ enough to be classed as an arthouse film, and releasing it on the internet I feel is a bad move, because within seconds of it being released on DVD it will be available to illegally download online anyway. </li></ul>
  5. 6. <ul><li>Why would it be released? Does it offer opportunities for franchises, sequels or merchandising? </li></ul><ul><li>From what we have seen in the introduction, I don’t think that it is the kind of film that has the possibility of a sequel being made as there may not be continuous characters or big enough cliff hangers. There could possibly be franchising, and there would definitely be merchandising, much like every other film there would be posters available, t-shirts and other miscellaneous items like that. </li></ul><ul><li>Link your conclusions to a discussion of the ‘mise en scene’ of your thriller. </li></ul><ul><li>The ‘mise en scene’ of the film is fairly dull, so not too much glamorous merchandise would be made. Hollywood wise, it may not come across as an exciting thriller like “the Fugitive” or something along those lines, as it seems much more gritty, which is sometimes what cinema goers like. </li></ul>
  6. 7. <ul><li>Consider the age and gender of your target and audience. Link this to the narrative and style of your film. </li></ul><ul><li>The target audience would be males and females in their late teens and beyond. The film would be classed as a 15 , not because there is an extraordinary amount of violence in it, but because there would be twists and tension that may not be suitable for those under 15. The majority of the audience would probably be male, due to the fact that the main character (the “bent cop”) is male, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that it would completely stop females from seeing the film. The level of talking/conversational techniques used in the film would be more suitable for a person of 15 years and above. </li></ul><ul><li>According to the ‘BBFC’ 15’s can have strong threat and menace, but the strongest gory images are not permitted, this is like are film, there is a lot of tension and threat, but the dead body “sprawled across the floor” is not shown. Also, violence can be strong (strong violence will probably be shown within the film) without dwelling on the infliction of pain. </li></ul>
  7. 8. <ul><li>How did you attract/address your audience? Link this into your audience profile (I.e. what age and gender they are) </li></ul><ul><li>The prospect that the witnesses and sub-main characters are teenagers would attract the younger generations of our target audience, and having the “Bent Cop” as a young man in his 20’s would draw in the latter generations of our target audiences. For it being a British thriller, it would appeal to people in their 40’s/50’s who were in their younger years when such influential British films such as “Get Carter” came out. </li></ul><ul><li>Are there any particular points in your film that would appeal to or particularly terrify a certain age or gender? </li></ul><ul><li>To be honest, from the opening sequence, there isn’t much material that would terrify audience members per-se. The line “the victim was found sprawled across the forest floor” may shock younger viewers which is one of the main reasons why we wanted to class the film as a 15. The fact that it is a British thriller would (as previously mentioned) appeal to older audience members. </li></ul><ul><li>Consider the use of camerawork in this section, I.e. point of view shots. </li></ul><ul><li>There aren’t any point of view shots in the opening shots, but some of the angles are quite interesting, for instance, the shot from behind the abandoned dog lead on the film, showing the teenagers looking shocked was thought of after watching films like “28 Days Later” for inspiration. </li></ul>
  8. 9. <ul><li>What other films are similar to yours, who do they appeal to? </li></ul><ul><li>The opening sequence very much reminds me of “Get Carter”, which is aimed at 18 year olds and above of any gender. I think this is because the beginning is very grey, the transition techniques are very simple and almost old fashioned, but I think that it is effective. Seeing as “Get Carter” is quite an old film, for those who haven’t seen it, it would probably appeal to those around their 30’s/40’s. </li></ul>
  9. 10. <ul><li>Who is the audience asked to put themselves in the position of, what are they being allowed to witness? </li></ul><ul><li>There are two options, either the two teenage boys or the “bent cop”. I think that the majority of audience members would imagine themselves in the “bent cop’s” shoes. </li></ul><ul><li>What impact does that have? </li></ul><ul><li>Well it wouldn’t really allow the audience to know whether he is a protagonist or an antagonist until the later stages or if not, the end of the film. </li></ul><ul><li>Link this back to generic conventions and the creation of suspense. </li></ul><ul><li>Well, tension is created by not seeing the killer or the dead body in the forest scenes. This is different to thrillers such as “Bad Boys 2” as the majority of the action is due to blood being splattered everywhere. Also, in a film like that, a death is not seen as such an important occurrence unless it is to one of the main characters, as they occur so much in the film. This is different to our film as the opening sequence is based on just one murder alone. </li></ul>
  10. 11. <ul><li>What were the strengths and weaknesses of the camera equipment? </li></ul><ul><li>Well, Richard and I spent some time using the “final cut express” editing software before we got around to filming the sequence, so we were completely sure how to go about doing what we wanted to be done to the material, when it came to editing. One thing that we were worried about was the fact that the cameras we were using seemed to pick up a lot of background noise. This problem was forgotten once we had placed a song over the top of the audio, because even when the song was turned down and the speaking was turned up, the song drowned out and whirring in the background. </li></ul>
  11. 12. <ul><li>Were there any problems you faced in the filming process? How did you resolve this issue? </li></ul><ul><li>When initially filming the office scene, we were worried about the space of the room, and the rest of the room showing up in the shot. This was resolved when we re-filmed by changing the location of the office and thoroughly making the room seem like an office, even the parts that weren’t supposed to be in the shot, even if they did glimpse in. When using the tripod we were able to pinpoint exactly what we wanted in the frame so there were no troubles. </li></ul>
  12. 13. <ul><li>Did you get to use new equipment that enhances your thriller? </li></ul><ul><li>The cameras that we used were of satisfactory quality. Using “Final Cut Express” editing software allowed us to make our film look much more professional as we could add filters like “blur” onto the forest flashbacks to make them seem much more dreamy. </li></ul><ul><li>Final Cut Express, what have you learnt about editing? Where there any particular effects that were useful in creating the “mise en scene”? </li></ul><ul><li>As previously mentioned, some of the video filters such as “blur” were very useful when wanting to make the shots seem more dreamy. Also, modifying the speed of shots was incredibly easy, I think all of the forest flashbacks were reduced to about an 80% speed, it made everything seem much more hazy, but there was also the added perk of it increasing the duration of our film. </li></ul>
  13. 14. <ul><li>Discuss the planning stage, the research into the genre. </li></ul><ul><li>Well, for a start, in class we watched a huge amount of opening sequences to thriller films, such as “Get Carter”, “Bad Boys 2”, “28 Days Later” and “the Silence of the Lambs”. These were a great help as we were able to see common techniques used in thriller openings. We got thinking about locations, the script and the characters. We then got down to storyboarding our film. The final outcome was not exactly the same as the initial storyboard, but it was very useful to have because it gave the team a structure to how to film the opening sequence. We also created questionnaires to help us with our research by asking the public what they want in thriller films. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you feel more confident with the equipment? </li></ul><ul><li>Oh yes, definitely. The real proof of this was when the group felt quite rushed, yet we still knew exactly what we were doing with all the equipment. I must say that the preliminary task at the beginning of the course dramatically helped us get a bearing for using all the equipment. </li></ul><ul><li>How successful do you feel your end product is at fulfilling the task? </li></ul><ul><li>I feel that the end product “Lost and Found” is extremely successful at fulfilling the task. It bares all common camera and plot driving techniques that you would find in a thriller, and similar to most thriller films, there are lots of possibilities for twists and turns in the storyline. Overall I am ecstatic at the end result of the film. </li></ul>
  14. 15. <ul><li>We showed around 10 people of 15 and above (the oldest being around 50). We got a mixed bag of comments, one of the main concerns was that they couldn’t clearly hear what the “bent cop” was saying. Other than that, they were all impressed with the acting, the fact that tension is easily created and the use of camera angles. </li></ul>

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