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Week 5 presentation
 

Week 5 presentation

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Team-Building, problem solving & creativity slides

Team-Building, problem solving & creativity slides

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    Week 5 presentation Week 5 presentation Presentation Transcript

    • +Week 5Problem Solving Houston, We have aOctober 11, 2012 Problem.
    • + Lateral thinking is solving problems through an indirect and creative approach, using reasoning that is not immediately obvious and involving ideas that may not be obtainable by using only traditional step-by-step logic.The term lateral thinking was coined by Cherry Thomas.
    • We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used+ when we created them. Albert Einstein
    • Critical thinking is primarily concerned with judging the true value of statements and seeking errors. + Lateral thinking is more concerned with themovement value of statements and ideas. A personwould use lateral thinking when they want to move from one known idea to creating new ideas.
    • +Whats an exampleof lateral thinking atwork?
    • + Edward De Bono Idea Generating Tools  Idea generating tools that are designed to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo  Focus tools that are designed to broaden where to search for new ideas  Harvest tools that are designed to ensure more value is received from idea generating output  Treatment tools that are designed to consider real-world constraints, resources, and support
    • + Idea Generating Tools
    • + Focus Tools Defined need or purpose.  We have a specific task or operate to focus on. This can include multiple focuses or re-phrasing the focus, redefining, re-describing... Routine Review.  There is no specific task or problem but the occasion exists for a review that can be of the general or purpose type. Idea-sensitive point - i.s.p.  A point identified of key importance because of its ramifications. Manufacturers recommend a computer should be shut down, once a week, to optimize operations. Whim.  We can focus on something simply because we have, at that particular time, the desire to do so.
    • + Harvesting Tools Harvesting trains us to look for other possibilities and alternatives. We can re-harvest the ideas we originally came up with or the ideas of other people. Take note of specific ideas that seem practical and have obvious value making a deliberate harvesting effort to collect ideas and concepts that are less well developed.
    • + Treatment Tools Treatment of Ideas helps develop ideas and shape them to fit an organization or situation. Treatment is particularly useful for working with Beginning Ideas to make them more specific and practical. One Treatment method is called Shaping. Here you think of any constraints that might interfere with the execution of the idea. Then you shape the idea to fit within these constraints.
    • + Edward De Bono Idea Generating Tools  Idea generating tools that are designed to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo  Focus tools that are designed to broaden where to search for new ideas  Harvest tools that are designed to ensure more value is received from idea generating output  Treatment tools that are designed to consider real-world constraints, resources, and support
    • + Six Thinking Hats Creative Problem Solving
    • + Goals of this program  Define parallel thinking  Identify each of the six hats  Learn how to ask a good question  Apply six hats method to problem solving
    • + What is parallel thinking? At any moment everyone is looking in the same direction.
    • + So the six hats are…?  Six colors of hats for six types of thinking  Each hat identifies a type of thinking  Hats are directions of thinking  Hats help a group use parallel thinking  You can “put on” and “take off” a hat
    • + Uses for Six Hats  Problem solving  Strategic planning  Running meetings  Much more
    • + Six colors…  White: neutral, objective  Red: emotional, angry  Black: serious, somber  Yellow: sunny, positive  Green: growth, fertility  Blue: cool, sky above
    • + …and six hats  White: objective facts & figures  Red: emotions & feelings  Black: cautious & careful  Yellow: hope, positive & speculative  Green: creativity, ideas & lateral thinking  Blue: control & organization of thinking
    • + General hat issues  Direction, not description  Set out to think in a certain direction  “Let’s have some black hat thinking…”  Not categories of people  Not: “He’s a black hat thinker.”  Everyone can and should use all the hats  A constructive form of showing off  Show off by being a better thinker  Not destructive right vs. wrong argument  Use in whole or in part
    • + Benefits of Six Thinking Hats  Provides a common language  Experience & intelligence of each person (Diversity of thought)  Use more of our brains  Helps people work against type, preference  Removal of ego (reduce confrontation)  Save time  Focus (one thing at a time)  Create, evaluate & implement action plans
    • + Using the hats  Use any hat, as often as needed  Sequence can be preset or evolving  Not necessary to use every hat  Time under each hat: generally, short  Requires discipline from each person  While using it, stay in the idiom  Adds an element of play, play along  Can be used by individuals and groups
    • + The blue hat  Thinking about thinking  Instructions for thinking  The organization of thinking  Control of the other hats  Discipline and focus
    • + The blue hat role  Control of thinking & the process  Begin & end session with blue hat  Facilitator, session leader’s role  Choreography  open, sequence, close  Focus: what should we be thinking about  Asking the right questions  Defining & clarifying the problem  Setting the thinking tasks
    • + Open with the blue hat…  Why we are here  what we are thinking about  definition of the situation or problem  alternative definitions  what we want to achieve  where we want to end up  the background to the thinking  a plan for the sequence of hats
    • + …and close with the blue hat  What we have achieved  Outcome  Conclusion  Design  Solution  Next steps
    • + White Hat Thinking  Neutral, objective information  Facts & figures  Questions: what do we know, what don’t we know, what do we need to know  Excludes opinions, hunches, judgements  Removes feelings & impressions  Two tiers of facts  Believed Facts  Checked Facts
    • + Red Hat Thinking  Emotions & feelings  Hunches, intuitions, impressions  Doesn’t have to be logical or consistent  No justifications, reasons or basis  All decisions are emotional in the end
    • + Yellow Hat Thinking  Positive & speculative  Positive thinking, optimism, opportunity  Benefits  Best-case scenarios  Exploration
    • + Green Hat Thinking  New ideas, concepts, perceptions  Deliberate creation of new ideas  Alternatives and more alternatives  New approaches to problems  Creative & lateral thinking
    • + Black Hat Thinking  Cautious and careful  Logical negative – why it won’t work  Critical judgement, pessimistic view  Separates logical negative from emotional  Focus on errors, evidence, conclusions  Logical & truthful, but not necessarily fair
    • + Six hats summary
    • + Problem Solving
    • Exercise:Using the 6 hat method create a solution for thelack of parking around Centennial. Be as wild asyou want. +Trade solutions with the group next to you.Merge with a group (not the one who got yoursolution) and create a remix of the two solutionsyou have at hand.
    • + Problem Solving To Where do you want to get To? (Definition) Lo Look at the Problem. (Logical Analysis) Po Possible Solutions (Generate Possibilities) So So what shall we Do? (Make your Decision) Go Get Going (The Implementation Phase)
    • +Make your Decision
    • + 6 steps to making an effective decision 1. Create a constructive environment. 2. Generate good alternatives. 3. Explore these alternatives. 4. Choose the best alternative. 5. Check your decision. 6. Communicate your decision, and take action.
    • + Step 1: Create a constructive environment  Establish the objective - Define what you want to achieve.  Agree on the process - Know how the final decision will be made, including whether it will be an individual or a team-based decision.  Involve the right people - Stakeholder Analysis is important in making an effective decision, and youll want to ensure that youve consulted stakeholders appropriately even if youre making an individual decision. Where a group process is appropriate, the decision-making group - typically a team of five to seven people - should have a good representation of stakeholders.
    • + Step 1: Create a constructive environment  Allow opinions to be heard - Encourage participants to contribute to the discussions, debates, and analysis without any fear of rejection from the group. This is one of the best ways to avoid groupthink.  Make sure youre asking the right question - Ask yourself whether this is really the true issue. The 5 Whys technique is a classic tool that helps you identify the real underlying problem that you face.  Use creativity tools from the start - The basis of creativity is thinking from a different perspective. Do this when you first set out the problem, and then continue it while generating alternatives.
    • + Step 2: Generate Good Alternatives Idea generating tools that are designed to break current thinking patterns—routine patterns, the status quo Focus tools that are designed to broaden where to search for new ideas Harvest tools that are designed to ensure more value is received from idea generating output Treatment tools that are designed to consider real-world constraints, resources, and support
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Risk In decision making, theres usually some degree of uncertainty, which inevitably leads to risk. By evaluating the risk involved with various options, you can determine whether the risk is manageable. Risk Analysis helps you look at risks objectively. It uses a structured approach for assessing threats, and for evaluating the probability of events occurring - and what they might cost to manage.
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Implications Another way to look at your options is by considering the potential consequences of each. Six Thinking Hats helps you evaluate the consequences of a decision by looking at the alternatives from six different perspectives.
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Validation Determine if resources are adequate, if the solution matches your objectives, and if the decision is likely to work in the long term. Starbursting helps you think about the questions you should ask to evaluate an alternative properly.
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Validation Determine if resources are adequate, if the solution matches your objectives, and if the decision is likely to work in the long term. To assess pros and cons of each option, use Force Field Analysis
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Plus-Minus- Interesting approach.
    • + Step 3: Explore the Alternatives Cost-Benefit Analysis looks at the financial feasibility of an alternative.
    • + Step 4:Grid Analysis, alsoknown as a decisionmatrix, is a key toolfor this type ofevaluation. Itsinvaluable becauseit helps you bringdisparate factorsinto your decision-making process in areliable andrigorous way.
    • + Step 4: Choose the Best Alternative Decision Trees are also useful in choosing between options. These help you lay out the different options open to you, and bring the likelihood of project success or failure into the decision making process.
    • + Step 5: Check Your Decision With all of the effort and hard work that goes into evaluating alternatives, and deciding the best way forward, its easy to forget to ‘sense check your decisions. This is where you look at the decision youre about to make dispassionately, to make sure that your process has been thorough, and to ensure that common errors havent crept into the decision-making process.
    • + Step 6: Communicate Your Decision, and Move to Action! Once youve made your decision, its important to explain it to those affected by it, and involved in implementing it. Talk about why you chose the alternative you did. The more information you provide about risks and projected benefits, the more likely people are to support the decision.
    • + SUMMARY: 6 steps to making an effective decision 1. Create a constructive environment. 2. Generate good alternatives. 3. Explore these alternatives. 4. Choose the best alternative. 5. Check your decision. 6. Communicate your decision, and take action.