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Week 4 presentation

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This is a set of slides for a class on team formation and goal setting

This is a set of slides for a class on team formation and goal setting


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  • 1. +Week 4Team Structure Who are we together?September 27, 2012
  • 2. + Objectives  Goal – what are we here to do?  Structure – how are we going to do it?  Establishing criteria for success  Evaluation: How are we doing? Or How Did we do?  Cooperation  Commitment
  • 3. + Team Purpose Time and effort is spent exploring, shaping, and agreeing on a purpose that belongs to the team collectively and individually. With time and attention, broad, meaningful aspirations can arise that motivate the team and provide a fundamental reason for extra effort.
  • 4. + The Team Purpose 1. Is a joint creation that exists only because of the team’s collaborative effort. 2. Guides what the team needs to do. 3. Mitigates risk.
  • 5. + The Team Purpose Gives the team an identity. This team identity keeps conflict constructive by providing a standard against which to resolve clashes between the interests of the individual and the interests of the team.
  • 6. + Team Contract Examples Adapted from BOEING 1. EVERY member is responsible for the teams progress and success. 2. Attend all team meetings and be on time. 3. Come prepared. 4. Carry out assignments on schedule. 5. Listen to and show respect for the contributions of other members; be an active listener. 6. CONSTRUCTIVELY criticize ideas, not persons. 7. Resolve conflicts constructively.
  • 7. + Team Contract Examples Adapted from BOEING 8. Pay attention, avoid disruptive behavior. 9. Avoid disruptive side conversations. 10. Only one person speaks at a time. 11. Everyone participates, no one dominates. 12. Be succinct, avoid long anecdotes and examples. 13. No rank in the room. 14. Respect those not present.
  • 8. + Team Contract Examples Adapted from BOEING 15. Ask questions when you do not understand. 16. Attend to your personal comfort needs at any time but minimize team disruption. 17. HAVE FUN !!
  • 9. + How to write effective behavioral contracts 1. Be specific 2. Keep it short
  • 10. A common meaningful+ purpose sets the tone and aspiration.
  • 11. + Why set goals?  Team members think critically about the important deliverables and how to achieve them.  Once set, goals help to keep the team focused on importance results.  Goals provide a clear picture of expectations and where to focus time, attention and resources. Goals give team members something to strive for which helps to motivate the team.  Difficult and challenging goals, that the team set, increase their persistence at achieving them.  When goals are reached, the team has a sense of accomplishment.
  • 12. + Why set goals? COOPERATE: Get everyone pulling together ORGANIZE: Allow everyone to use their time more effectively CLARIFY: Set clear guidelines COMMUNICATE: Contribute to communication EVALUATE: Provide evaluation criteria
  • 13. + A Goal needs a plan Each set goal needs a well-defined plan that explains how the team intends to achieve it. HOW TO PLAN: Identify the tasks that must be accomplished Prioritize and establish the conditions necessary to carry out each task. Assign tasks Establish check-in structures Decide what “done” looks like.
  • 14. + A plan needs to be real The plan is usually written down. Helps to organize the details of how to reach the goal. A tangible copy of a main plan helps establish common understanding. Checking back with status updates helps the team to remain focused & see progress.
  • 15. + SMART Goals
  • 16. + SMART Goals Specific Measureable Achievable Relevant Time-Based
  • 17. + SMART Goals Specific  Describe the goal in specific terms so there is no confusion about what the team wants to accomplish.
  • 18. + Smart Goals Measurable  When you measure progress, you stay on track, reach target dates, and achievement spurs you on to continued effort. Measurement makes a goal more concrete.  When a goal isn’t measurable, you don’t know if or when or even how you’re making progress toward its completion. Also,
  • 19. + Smart Goals Achievable  Dont set the team up for failure by setting a goal that is out of reach.  Successful teams know to stretch their talents to grow, they also know to set reasonable goals.
  • 20. + Smart Goals Relevant  Plan goals that will move the over-all project forward.  Get feedback, ask if people understand the why of their contribution.
  • 21. + Smart Goals Time-based  People are better able to focus their efforts on goal attainment when they are committed to deadlines.  Without an end date there is no sense of urgency.  An effective goal has a start point, end point, and fixed duration.
  • 22. + Smart Goal Example 1 Example of SMART goal – saving money  Specific: My specific goal is to save $1000 in 2 months.  Measurable: I’ll measure my progress by saving $125 each week.  Attainable: I’ll set-up automatic transfers of $125 each week from my checking to my savings account. I make enough each week to save 125 dollars.  Realistic: Realistically, I tend to spend money if it’s in my checking account. Setting up the auto-transfer will keep more from touching my money.  Timely: If I havent saved my goal in 2 months I will review the budget. See how much remains to be saved.
  • 23. + Smart Goals Example 2 Example of SMART goal – writing a book  Specific: I want to write a book on my life story.  Measurable: The book will be 150 pages of content so and I will measure my progress monthly.  Attainable: If I finish 12 and a half pages a month, I will have 150 pages by my deadline. Realistic: At times it can be difficult for me to get my thoughts on paper, so I’m giving myself a lot of time to finish.  Timely: I’m allowing 12 months to finish this book. 12.5 pages a month is 150 pages in one year.
  • 24. + Team Formation http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/234d4018be/frenemies-round-2-new-guy
  • 25. + Tuckmans Model  Forming  Storming  Norming  Performing
  • 26. + Forming  In the Forming stage, team members are introduced. They state why they were chosen or volunteered for the team and what they hope to accomplish within the team.  This is a stage of transition from individual to member status, and a test of the leaders status.
  • 27. + FORMING Forming can include these feelings and behaviors:  Excitement, anticipation, and optimism.  Pride in being chosen for the project  Tentative attachment to the team  Suspicion and anxiety about the job.  Uncertainty regarding roles & purpose.  Team member introductions.
  • 28. + FORMING  Abstract discussions of the concepts and issues, and for some members, impatience with these discussions. There will be difficulty in identifying some of the relevant problems.  Because there is so much going on to distract members attention in the beginning, the team accomplishes little, if anything, that concerns its project goals. This is perfectly normal.
  • 29. + FORMING Challenges  Team members going in different directions  Team members not recognizing the resources in the team What to do  Understand purpose of team  Create the Team Contract  Assess resources, skills, knowledge & styles of individual members  Answer: Why are we here? Who are these people?
  • 30. Phases 1 2 3 4Tuckman FORMING STORMING NORMING PERFORMINGEmotional Fear Frustration Hopeful RespectTone of the Confusion Fear Confident ProactiveTeam Unknowing Defensive Risk Taking Openness Unfocused energy Low Trust Purposeful Smooth flowIndividual Can I / we do it? We can’t do it We can do it if… We are doing it!Unspoken because…..Question[Internal]Leadershi • Structured • Supportive • Shared Success • Informalp Style • Informational • Facilitative • Sharing style • Invitation to all • Focus on responsibility • Connecting to participate clarity and • Build • Maintain • Inclusion honesty confidence momentum
  • 31. + STORMING During the teams transition from the "As-Is" to the "To-Be," is called the Storming phase. All members have their own ideas as to how the process should look, and personal agendas can take over.
  • 32. + STORMING  Storming is probably the most difficult stage for the team.  Team members begin to realize the tasks that are ahead are different and more difficult than they imagined.  Impatient about the lack of progress, members argue about what actions the team should take.  They try to rely solely on their personal and professional experience, and resist collaborating with most of the other team members.
  • 33. + STORMING Storming includes these feelings and behaviors:  Conflict.  Resisting the tasks.  Resisting quality improvement approaches suggested by other members.  Sharp fluctuations in attitude about the team and the projects chance of success.  Arguing among members even when they agree on the real issues.
  • 34. + STORMING Storming includes these feelings and behaviors:  Defensiveness, competition, and choosing sides.  Questioning the wisdom of those who selected this project and appointed the other members of the team.  Establishing unrealistic goals.  Disunity, increased tension, and jealousy.
  • 35. + STORMING These pressures mean that team members have little energy to spend on progressing towards the teams goal. But they are beginning to understand one another.
  • 36. + STORMING Challenges  Members not agreeing on how to work together  Members working at cross-purposes What to do  Resolve differences in what members expect of each other and how they will work together.  Review ground rules & game plan  Answer: How are we going to work together?
  • 37. Phases 1 2 3 4Tuckman FORMING STORMING NORMING PERFORMINGEmotional Fear Frustration Hopeful RespectTone of the Confusion Fear Confident ProactiveTeam Unknowing Defensive Risk Taking Openness Unfocused energy Low Trust Purposeful Smooth flowIndividual Can I / we do it? We can’t do it We can do it if… We are doing it!Unspoken because…..Question[Internal]Leadershi • Structured • Supportive • Shared Success • Informalp Style • Informational • Facilitative • Sharing style • Invitation to all • Focus on responsibility • Connecting to participate clarity and • Build • Maintain • Inclusion honesty confidence momentum
  • 38. + NORMING The Norming phase is when the team reaches a consensus on the "To-Be" process. Everyone wants to share the newly found focus. Enthusiasm is high, and the team is tempted to go beyond the original scope of the process.
  • 39. + NORMING  During this stage, members reconcile competing loyalties and responsibilities.  They accept the team, team ground rules, their roles in the team, and the individuality of fellow members.  Emotional conflict is reduced as previously competitive relationships become more cooperative.
  • 40. + NORMING Norming includes these feelings and behaviors:  An ability to express criticism constructively.  Acceptance of membership in the team.  An attempt to achieve harmony by avoiding conflict.  More friendliness, confiding in each other, and sharing of personal problems.  A sense of team cohesion, spirit, and goals.  Establishing and maintaining team ground rules and boundaries.  Orientation to mutual goals
  • 41. + NORMING As team members begin to work out their differences, they now have more time and energy to spend on the project.
  • 42. + NORMING Challenges  Group-think  Exclusionary behaviour or bullying What to do  Remind group of need for respect  Reward unconventional thinking  Do creativity exercises
  • 43. Phases 1 2 3 4Tuckman FORMING STORMING NORMING PERFORMINGEmotional Fear Frustration Hopeful RespectTone of the Confusion Fear Confident ProactiveTeam Unknowing Defensive Risk Taking Openness Unfocused energy Low Trust Purposeful Smooth flowIndividual Can I / we do it? We can’t do it We can do it if… We are doing it!Unspoken because…..Question[Internal]Leadershi • Structured • Supportive • Shared Success • Informalp Style • Informational • Facilitative • Sharing style • Invitation to all • Focus on responsibility • Connecting to participate clarity and • Build • Maintain • Inclusion honesty confidence momentum
  • 44. + PERFORMING The team has now settled its relationships and expectations. They can begin performing by diagnosing, solving problems, and choosing and implementing changes. At last team members have discovered and accepted each others strengths and weakness, and learned what their roles are.
  • 45. + PERFORMING Performing includes these feelings and behaviors:  Members have insights into personal and group processes, and better understanding of each others strengths and weakness.  Constructive self-change.  Ability to prevent or work through group problems  Close attachment to the team.  Clear role definition with flexibility.  Collaboration; interdependence.  Consistent excellent performance; high group satisfaction.
  • 46. + PERFORMING The team is now an effective, cohesive unit. You can tell when your team has reached this stage because you start getting a lot of work done.
  • 47. + Exercises Modeling Tuckmans model Ameoba Race A little more GANGNAM STYLE

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