M phil hse mirta

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My view on e-learning modlue of Mphil course at SUN and some bibliography

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M phil hse mirta

  1. 1. M. Phil HSE II e-Learning Module 2010 M. Garcia-Jardón St. 15814505
  2. 2. According to Wikipedia: “e” = exciting, enthusiastic According to myself, I dare to say “e” stand also for “electronic” way of learning – and teaching.
  3. 3. Distribution ( Behaviorism ): Ways of interaction between students & educators E-Mail SMS Websites (Blackboard) You Tube Blog
  4. 4. Interaction (Cognitivism): Blogs Google groups
  5. 5. Collaboration (Constructivism): Blogs Google docs Google groups
  6. 6. Component Display Theory (M.D. Merrill) at: http:// tip.psychology.org/merrill.html
  7. 7. http://itsinfo.tamu.edu/News___Events/Teaching___Technology_Newsletter.php
  8. 8. What is Motivational Design? What is meant by motivational design? What are some of the motivational concepts and theories that have a motivational design component? What is the ARCS Model? What are its overall characteristics? Is it a theory or just a model? What Are the Elements of Learner Motivation? The acronym ARCS stands for Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction. What are the specific properties of each category? What is the ARCS Motivational Design Process What are the steps and key issues in the ARCS design process? To what kinds of problems can you apply it?   Motivational design by J. Keller
  9. 9. <ul><li>Keller, J. M. (1983). Motivational design of instruction. In C. M. Reigeluth (Ed.), Instructional-design theories and models: An overview of their current status . Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. - Keller, J. M. (1984). The use of the ARCS model of motivation in teacher training. In K. Shaw & A. J. Trott (Eds.), Aspects of Educational Technology Volume XVII: staff Development and Career Updating. London: Kogan Page. - Keller, J. M. (1987). Development and use of the ARCS model of motivational design. Journal of Instructional Development, 10(3) , 2 – 10. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Table 1 ARCS Categories S1 Intrinsic reinforcement S2 Extrinsic rewards S3 Equity C1 Learning requirements C2 Success opportunities C3 Personal control R1 Goal orientation R2 Motive matching R3 Familiarity A1 Perceptual arousal A2 Inquiry arousal A3 Variability Satisfaction Confidence Relevance Attention
  11. 11. <ul><li>Keller, J. M. (1987a). Development and use of the ARCS model of motivational design. Journal of Instructional Development, 10(3) , 2 – 10. - Keller, J. M. (1987b). Strategies for stimulating the motivation to learn. Performance & Instruction, 26(8) , 1-7. - Keller, J. M. (1999). Motivation in cyber learning environments. Educational Technology International, 1(1) , 7 – 30. </li></ul>
  12. 12. ARCS Design Process A systematic problem solving approach. It requires knowledge of human motivation. It progresses from learner analysis, to solution design. The process includes: - Knowing and identifying the elements of human motivation - Analyzing audience characteristics to determine motivational requirements - Identifying characteristics of instructional materials and processes that stimulate motivation - Selecting appropriate motivational tactics - Applying and evaluating appropriate tactics
  13. 13. <ul><li>Keller, J. M. (1987a). Development and use of the ARCS model of motivational design. Journal of Instructional Development, 10(3) , 2 – 10. - Keller, J. M. (1987). The systematic process of motivational design. Performance & Instruction, 26(9) , 1-8. - Keller, J. M. (1999). Motivation in cyber learning environments. Educational Technology International, 1(1) , 7 – 30. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Instructional Design (ADDIE) <ul><li>Analyze </li></ul><ul><li>Design </li></ul><ul><li>Develop </li></ul><ul><li>Implement </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate </li></ul>
  15. 15. Task: OUR ASSIGNMENT <ul><li>Think of a discussion topic that would enable learning of a key area </li></ul><ul><li>Write a webpage giving the instructions for the discussion </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Title </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Aim </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Grade </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Deadline / timeframe </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Instructions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Upload/add the webpage to our learning module </li></ul>
  16. 16. Tasks: <ul><li>Create a discussion group where this discussion can take place </li></ul>
  17. 17. Web-studies: <ul><li>I have to design an on-line short course for post graduate students on HIV/AIDS. </li></ul><ul><li>As part of the module I need to involve the students in an on-line discussion </li></ul>
  18. 18. Design: Learning Outcomes Short course in Pathology of HIV/AIDS <ul><li>At the end of the module, the students will be able to: </li></ul><ul><li>Assess and interpret the results of reported HIV/AIDS related conditions by biopsies or post-mortem </li></ul><ul><li>Classify and understand HIV/AIDS related disorders in all organs and systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand ethics on disclosure HIV/AIDS related conditions in a professional, confident and competent way. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Design: Content outline Outline of the Module Reflect on collected findings and feed-back on the module Exchange impressions on findings and feed-back on the module 5 - 6 Students to discuss on the gathered reports and reflect on results Gathering reports to comment on 3 – 4 Students to interact among themselves and consult facilitator online Consultation 2 Students to review the links and bibliography. Introduction to the topic 1 Specific Tasks Topic Week
  20. 20. Design: Select web tools
  21. 22. Create a learning community not electronic textbooks Focus on the learning process instead of the technology
  22. 23. To be continued. . .

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