Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Case Econ08 Ppt 12
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Case Econ08 Ppt 12

1,973

Published on

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,973
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
94
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Chapter Outline 12 General Equilibrium and the Efficiency of Perfect Competition General Equilibrium Analysis A Technological Advance: The Electronic Calculator Market Adjustment to Changes in Demand Formal Proof of a General Competitive Equilibrium Allocative Efficiency and Competitive Equilibrium Pareto Efficiency The Efficiency of Perfect Competition Perfect Competition versus Real Markets The Sources of Market Failure Imperfect Markets Public Goods Externalities Imperfect Information Evaluating the Market Mechanism
  • 3. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM AND THE EFFICIENCY OF PERFECT COMPETITION FIGURE 12.1 Firm and Household Decisions Input and output markets cannot be considered separately or as if they operated independently. While it is important to understand the decisions of individual firms and households and the functioning of individual markets, we now need to add it all up, to look at the operation of the system as a whole.
  • 4. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM AND THE EFFICIENCY OF PERFECT COMPETITION partial equilibrium analysis The process of examining the equilibrium conditions in individual markets and for households and firms separately. general equilibrium The condition that exists when all markets in an economy are in simultaneous equilibrium. efficiency The condition in which the economy is producing what people want at least possible cost.
  • 5. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS AN EARLY TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCE: THE ELECTRONIC CALCULATOR FIGURE 12.2 Cost Saving Technological Change in the Calculator Industry A significant—if not sweeping—technological change in a single industry affects many markets. Households face a different structure of prices and must adjust their consumption of many products. Labor reacts to new skill requirements and is reallocated across markets. Capital is also reallocated.
  • 6. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS MARKET ADJUSTMENT TO CHANGES IN DEMAND FIGURE 12.3 Adjustment in an Economy with Two Sectors
  • 7. GENERAL EQUILIBRIUM ANALYSIS FORMAL PROOF OF A GENERAL COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM Economic theorists have struggled with the question of whether a set of prices that equates supply and demand in all markets simultaneously can actually exist when there are literally thousands and thousands of markets. If such a set of prices were not possible, the result could be continuous cycles of expansion, contraction, and instability.
  • 8. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM PARETO EFFICIENCY Pareto efficiency or Pareto optimality A condition in which no change is possible that will make some members of society better off without making some other members of society worse off.
  • 9. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM THE EFFICIENCY OF PERFECT COMPETITION The three basic questions discussed previously included: 1. What gets produced? What determines the final mix of output? 2. How is it produced? How do capital, labor, and land get divided up among firms? In other words, what is the allocation of resources among producers? 3. Who gets what is produced? What determines which households get how much? What is the distribution of output among consuming households? To demonstrate that the perfectly competitive system leads to an efficient, or Pareto optimal, allocation of resources, we need to show that no changes are possible that will make some people better off without making others worse off.
  • 10. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM Efficient Allocation of Resources among Firms To determine whether it is efficient to hire additional clerks at the Registry of Motor Vehicles, the cost must be weighed against the value of people’s time spent waiting in lines. The assumptions that factor markets are competitive and open, that all firms pay the same prices for inputs, and that all firms maximize profits lead to the conclusion that the allocation of resources among firms is efficient.
  • 11. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM Efficient Distribution of Outputs among Households We all know that people have different tastes and preferences, and that they will buy very different things in very different combinations. As long as everyone shops freely in the same markets, no redistribution of final outputs among people will make them better off. If you and I buy in the same markets and pay the same prices, and I buy what I want and you buy what you want, we cannot possibly end up with the wrong combination of things. Free and open markets are essential to this result.
  • 12. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM Producing What People Want: The Efficient Mix of Output The condition that ensures that the right things are produced is P = MC . Society will produce the efficient mix of output if all firms equate price and marginal cost. FIGURE 12.4 The Key Efficiency Condition: Price Equals Marginal Cost
  • 13. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM FIGURE 12.5 Efficiency in Perfect Competition Follows from a Weighing of Values by Both Households and Firms
  • 14. ALLOCATIVE EFFICIENCY AND COMPETITIVE EQUILIBRIUM PERFECT COMPETITION VERSUS REAL MARKETS We have built a model of a perfectly competitive market system that produces an efficient allocation of resources, an efficient mix of output, and an efficient distribution of output. The perfectly competitive model is built on a set of assumptions, all of which must hold for our conclusions to be fully valid. These assumptions do not always hold in real-world markets.
  • 15. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE market failure Occurs when resources are misallocated, or allocated inefficiently. The result is waste or lost value.
    • There are four important sources of market failure:
    • imperfect market structure, or noncompetitive behavior,
    • the existence of public goods,
    • the presence of external costs and benefits, and
    • imperfect information.
  • 16. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE IMPERFECT MARKETS imperfect condition An industry in which single firms have some control over price and competition. Imperfectly competitive industries give rise to an inefficient allocation of resources. monopoly An industry composed of only one firm that produces a product for which there are no close substitutes and in which significant barriers exist to prevent new firms from entering the industry. In all imperfectly competitive industries, output is lower—the product is underproduced—and price is higher than it would be under perfect competition. The equilibrium condition P = MC does not hold, and the system does not produce the most efficient product mix.
  • 17. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE PUBLIC GOODS public goods, or social goods Goods or services that bestow collective benefits on members of society. Generally, no one can be excluded from enjoying their benefits. The classic example is national defense. private goods Products produced by firms for sale to individual households.
  • 18. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE Private provision of public goods fails. A completely laissez-faire market system will not produce everything that all members of a society might want. Citizens must band together to ensure that desired public goods are produced, and this is generally accomplished through government spending financed by taxes. A classic example of a public good is a park such as Central Park in Manhattan producing collective benefits for New Yorkers and tourists.
  • 19. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE The market does not always force consideration of all the costs and benefits of decisions. Yet for an economy to achieve an efficient allocation of resources, all costs and benefits must be weighed. EXTERNALITIES externality A cost or benefit resulting from some activity or transaction that is imposed or bestowed on parties outside the activity or transaction.
  • 20. THE SOURCES OF MARKET FAILURE The conclusion that markets work efficiently rests heavily on the assumption that consumers and producers have full knowledge of product characteristics, available prices, and so forth. The absence of full information can lead to transactions that are ultimately disadvantageous. IMPERFECT INFORMATION imperfect information The absence of full knowledge concerning product characteristics, available prices, and so forth.
  • 21. EVALUATING THE MARKET MECHANISM Freely functioning markets in the real world do not always produce an efficient allocation of resources, and this result provides a potential role for government in the economy
  • 22.
    • efficiency
    • externality
    • general equilibrium
    • imperfect competition
    • imperfect information
    • market failure
    • monopoly
    REVIEW TERMS AND CONCEPTS Pareto efficiency, or Pareto optimality partial equilibrium analysis private goods public goods, or social goods Key efficiency condition in perfect competition: P X = MC X

×