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Lo jcyberbullying

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  • 1. WHY THEY’RE EVEN BETTER THAN GOOGLE AND WIKIPEDIA – REALLY! Library Databases
  • 2. Do You Believe Everything You Read?
  • 3. Image Attibution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/will-lion/2595497078/sizes/z/in/photostream/
    • Evaluate (think about) information -- don’t believe everything you read
    • Always compare multiple (many) sources
    • Always cite your sources (Citation Maker, Easybib.com, etc.)
  • 4. Evaluating Information
    • What do you think of these sites for research? Thumbs up or thumbs down:
    • Wikipedia CNN
    • Yahoo Answers Gale PowerSearch
    • The New York Times Printed book
    • The World Book Personal website
    • Encyclopedia
  • 5. Wikipedia
  • 6. Image Attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mikeeperez/2453225588/
    • When should you use Wikipedia? Talk to the person sitting next to you to decide yes or no:
    • To get a quick overview of your research topic?
    • As the main source of information for your research paper?
    • When reading about a pop culture topic of personal interest?
    • When making an important decision about your health?
    • To see what sources the article’s author’s used?
  • 7. Image attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/galant/3268338756/sizes/l/in/photostream/ School pays for access – has info you can’t get free on the web Edited/fact checked, so often more reliable than websites Where are they? Go to your school website and look on the Library Home Page. Also check your public library – you’ll need your card and PIN. Often include citations!
  • 8. Go to Library, Class Projects, Cyber-bullying
  • 9. SIRS Issues Researcher
  • 10.  
  • 11. Be sure to use the database tools – citations, audio, translations, email, print view, share online and much more.
  • 12. Opposing Viewpoints
  • 13.  
  • 14.  
  • 15. Opposing Viewpoints
  • 16. Using Gale PowerSearch
  • 17. Using Gale PowerSearch
  • 18. Brainstorm Keywords
    • With a partner, come up with at different ways to describe your topic
    • Try to think of synonyms (words that mean the same thing)
    • Share a few with the class
  • 19. Using Gale PowerSearch
  • 20. Using Gale PowerSearch
  • 21. Cite Your Sources: Why & How
  • 22. WHY Cite Your Sources?
  • 23. WHY Cite Your Sources?
    • Talk to the person next to you for about two minutes about why you think it’s important to cite your sources .
    • Write at least two reasons in your notes.
    • What reasons did you write down?
  • 24. WHY Cite Your Sources?
    • Helps you avoid plagiarism
    • Always give the author proper credit!
    Image attribution: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3191/3020966268_4f854c0617.jpg
  • 25. WHY Cite Your Sources?
    • 2. Shows you consulted many good sources. You didn’t just make it up!
    Image attribution: http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3213/2979328686_5e34ec6677.jpg
  • 26. WHY Cite Your Sources?
    • 3. Provides a “trail” for your readers, in case they want to follow your path and do further research
    Image attribution: http://farm1.static.flickr.com/41/83594459_70d9688f23.jpg
  • 27. WHY Cite Your Sources?
    • 4. Expected in all academic settings, from high school to graduate school to your professional life
    Image attribution: http://www.flickr.com/photos/krcla/2069243613/sizes/o/in/photostream/
  • 28. WHEN Should You Cite Your Sources?
    • 1. When you quote from a source
    • If you use the author’s exact words, put them in “quotation marks” and then cite your source.
    • 2. When you paraphrase a source
    • If you use the author’s idea, even if you put it in your own words, you must still cite your source.
  • 29. WHEN Should You Cite Your Sources?
    • My source says: Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians.
  • 30. WHEN Should You Cite Your Sources?
    • My source says: Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians.
    My paper says: Frogs live on every continent except Antartica. Do I need to cite my source? Thumbs up for yes, down for no. What else am I missing here?
  • 31. WHEN Should You Cite Your Sources?
    • My source says: Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians.
    My paper says: Frogs are amphibians. Do I need to cite my source? Thumbs up for yes, down for no.
  • 32. WHEN Should You Cite Your Sources?
    • My source says: Frogs live on every continent except Antarctica, but tropical regions have the greatest number of species. Frogs are classified as amphibians.
    My paper says: In the third grade, I had a pet frog called Hoppy. Do I need to cite my source? Thumbs up for yes, down for no.
  • 33. HOW to Cite Your Sources
    • Use the OSLIS Citation Maker at:
    • cm.oslis.org
    • Click the MLA Secondary link
    • Choose your Source Type from the yellow box.
  • 34. HOW to Cite Your Sources
    • Enter information about the book or website
    • -- Look for place of publication, publisher, and publication date on the copyright page of the book
  • 35. HOW to Cite Your Sources
    • Note the difference between Title of Work and Title of Overall Website.
    • Identify the author, if possible
    • Who published/sponsored the site?
    • If you can’t answer either of those two questions, are you sure you trust this site?
  • 36. Works Cited Page
  • 37. HOW to Cite Your Sources
    • What’s wrong with this Works Cited list?
  • 38. HOW to Cite Your Sources
    • Questions?